The New Pact on Migration and Asylum: what is at stake?

The New Pact on Migration and Asylum: what is at stake?

[FRENCH BELOW] [VERSION FRANÇAISE PLUS BAS]

______________________________________________

“Migration is a European challenge and all of Europe must do its part” [1] said Ursula von der Leyen in its speech on the 16th of September 2020.

As she put forward, migration is a complicated issue in Europe, and needs to be dealt with in a sustainable way. This is why on the 23th of September, Ylva Johansson, Commissioner for Home Affairs, and Margaritis Schinas, Vice President for Promoting our European Way of Life, released the New Pact on Migration and Asylum that is meant to reform the previous failed system.

 Migration and asylum issues have been very significant for the EU since the 2015 crisis. This crisis questioned EU strength, and its capacity to rise up and talk with the same voice on this internal and external matter. It was more a political crisis rather than a migratory one[2]. Hence, the migration and asylum issue is not only about humanitarian sensitivity, but it is also about the EU as a whole, its strength on the international scene. This is why it became a sensitive issue, for which the EU is still looking for solutions. The Juncker Commission responded to the 2015 crisis and tried to implement a system to manage the important influx of migrants. However, this crisis revealed the weakness of a European asylum and migration system that could not deal with the pressure imposed by the urgency of the moment. It revealed a European Union that is jammed by Member States’ disagreements and incapacity to be united.

Ursula von der Leyen made the migration and asylum issue a cornerstone of her mandate. She is willing to propose a New Pact on migration and asylum that would get rid of the Dublin regulation. She claimed that this pact will be more “human and humane”[3]. However, the critics of this newly proposed pact show that she, and the two commissioners that carried the project, are tied up by Member States’ wills.

Migration and asylum: a European gridlock

Shared competencies between the European Union and Member States

In the migration and asylum area, the EU and Member States share competencies. Indeed, the European Union sets common standards thanks to many regulations and directives, but the effective implementation of asylum and migration policies is the responsibility of Member States, which must ensure that their national legislation complies with EU law and international agreements[4]

For instance, the European Union has tried to harmonize Member States’ laws on asylum with the creation of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS). It sets the minimal rules in the asylum domain for Member States regarding the processing of asylum claims and people seeking protection. The CEAS is built on several directives and regulations[5]. One of them is the revised, and most controversial, Dublin Regulation. It sets the general rule for the repartition of asylum seekers in Member States. The Dublin regulation states that an asylum claim needs to be processed in the first country of arrival. As we will discuss later, this system has been criticized because it places the burden of asylum claims’ processing on the countries that are at the external borders of the EU, such as Greece, Italy, Spain or the Eastern European countries.

Besides, the Treaty of Lisbon states that migration policies in the European Union rely on the solidarity and responsibility sharing principles (article 80 of the FUE treaty)[6]. As a result, there is a European legal framework to manage migration and asylum.

So why migration and asylum became an issue for the EU?

First of all, the answer lies in the fact that Member States construct their own migration and asylum policies on the basis of this legislative framework. Indeed, if regulations are binding legislative acts, directives are legislative acts that just set up objectives and let Member States implement those objectives as they want. Thus, each Member States’ policies on migration and asylum is different, creating obstacles in building a common and efficient migration and asylum system. Besides, even if regulations are binding, the delay to sanction States that would not respect them is too long, and so they are less effective. For example, Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic were condemned by the European Union Court of Justice, for having refused to participate in the relocation system of 2015 (that was voted by the European Union), only the 2nd of April 2020. It came five years after the crisis, when the relocation system was not implemented anymore[7]. Therefore, it feels like Member States can behave as they want to, with impunity.

Then, even if the EU has tried to build a common system, asylum and migration are fields where Member States’ legislation prevail. The sharing of competencies creates a gridlock in the implementation of a common European system. The EU needs Member States to be on the same page in order to move forward on its migration and asylum policies, which is far from being the case.

The Dublin Regulation: a showcase of the European asylum system’s failure

The Moria camp’s fire on the 9th of September was a shocking reminder of the EU system’s failure. Indeed, this regulation that was created to avoid asylum shopping[8], developed in fact inequalities among Member States in managing migrants. The flaws of this regulation appeared during the 2015 crisis, when the European Union was suddenly overwhelmed with migrants, especially Eastern and Southern Member States. It led to the closure of borders, such as in Hungary, fostering mistrust and resentment among Member States. Thus, the countries that are at the EU external border became more and more crowded with migrants, without having enough resources to take care of them. It resulted in the apparition of camps where living conditions are awful, and human rights not respected.

The failure of the Dublin regulation showed the flaws of a migration and asylum system which relies on the solidarity principle to relocate migrants, that would be granted asylum, or to return them to their country of origin. However, this principle did not survive Member States’ competing interests. Besides, countries that were hosting migrants became overrun. For example, in 2019 “The ratio between decisions in the Dublin procedure and asylum applications filed was 20%, which could mean that a high number of applicants for international protection continued to make secondary movements to EU+ countries.”[9]. It gives the evidence of a system that failed to manage properly the influx of migrants.

The Visegrad group, composed of Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, refused to relocate migrants at all, and pushed for a voluntary solidarity. Southern countries such as Greece, Italy or Spain, which were hosting refugees and felt left alone facing this responsibility, claimed that the solidarity principle should be mandatory, and that the Dublin regulation was unfair.  This lack of cooperation between Member States fragilized the European Union as a whole.

This is why the Juncker Commission tried to respond to the crisis by implementing several instruments to manage the influx of migrants. This response was defined as an externalization of the border policy, because the measures put in place were mainly about protecting the external border and to prevent irregular migration. In order to do so, the Juncker Commission relied on Frontex (the European Border and Coast Guard Agency), but also on third party countries agreements. For instance, an agreement was made with Turkey: in exchange for development funding, it would host migrants and prevent them to cross the Mediterranean. However, if this solution was good to relieve pressure on European host countries, it became also a political tool for blackmailing. Indeed, on the 27th of February 2020, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan started to let migrants enter the EU, breaking the EU-Turkey agreement. This decision was made following the death of 33 Turkish soldiers by a Syrian government airstrike. It was meant to draw attention to the Syrian crisis and its consequences, but also to put pressure on the EU to continue its funding[10].

Therefore, the European framework to manage migration, that was done in the urgency of the crisis, revealed flaws creating tensions among Member States. This is why it needed to be reformed.

An ambitious New Pact that stops where Member States sovereignty begins

In the last five years, the influx of migrants in Europe substantially decreased[11].

It is then the time to think about a European migration and asylum policy for the long term. Before proposing a new pact on migration and asylum, Ylva Johansson and Margaritis Schinas traveled in Member States to gather their opinion and aspirations for the new European framework. This approach aimed at creating a more inclusive and sustainable system that will fit all their interests. However, trying to fit all demands can lead to difficult compromises and gridlock to effectively create a more humane migration and asylum system.

The New Pact on Migration and Asylum: finding the equilibrium between Member States’ interests

In her State of the Union address, Ursula von der Leyen promised a more “human and humane system”[12]. In framing the New pact, Ylva Johansson and Margaritis Schinas had to find a balance between a humane approach, respecting human rights and human dignity, and a security approach, protecting the external borders. Indeed, the security approach is the only point of consensus between Member States, but some organizations of the civil society, such as Oxfam and CNCD 11.11.11[13], call for a more humane approach.

First of all, the New Pact plans a solidarity mechanism through three options of contribution[14]:

  • Relocating migrants
  • Return sponsorship, that is to say “Member States would provide all necessary support to the Member State under pressure to swiftly return those who have no right to stay”[15]. This return procedure must take place in the 8 months following the decision, otherwise the Member State in charge will have to relocate the individual on its territory.
  • Operational support, like supporting the construction of shelters, providing coast guards and so forth.  

The New Pact creates tailored responses for three types of situations:

  • Situation of « search and rescue”[16]: in this case, Member States will be able to choose between the three options of solidarity. A “pool” of voluntary States will be created for the relocation of migrants. Besides, NGOs that participate in the rescue of migrants in the sea will not face lawsuits.
  • Situation of “pressure” [17]
  • Situations of « crisis” [18]

These three situations call for different responses. For instance, if a Member State is under pressure because of a large influx of migrants, it can trigger a “mandatory solidarity mechanism” [19]. In this case, the Commission organizes the management of the crisis. A repartition scheme, that is calculated thanks to a “distribution key”[20], will determine the fair share of Member States[21]. On this basis, each one can choose to relocate or to sponsor returns, and also to give operational support. This mechanism is supposed to be implemented by a binding act, which every Member State would have to respect. Therefore, this mechanism is tailored to respond to the demands of Southern European countries, that were denouncing the lack of support from other Member States. Choosing between relocation or sponsored returns is also a way to fit with the Visegrad group’s refusal to accept relocated migrants.

Regarding the returns, in case a person would not be granted international protection, the Commission wants a better implication of Frontex[22] Besides, readmission agreements will be fostered by trade, development or visa incentives. A network of experts will be put in place to help Member States in the return process.

In order to make the external border control more effective, the New Pact wants a screening procedure of no more than five days, including the registration of fingerprints in the EURODAC[23] system, as well as health and security checks[24]. Furthermore, for migrants deemed unlikely to obtain international protection, the asylum application will be processed at the border within twelve weeks[25]. As for the Dublin regulation, it will be revised. The country responsible for the application may be the country where a migrant has family ties, where he or she has worked or studied, or the country that issued the visa. Otherwise, the country of first arrival will remain responsible for the application[26]. These propositions are made in order to avoid crowded camps where human rights and human dignity are denied.

Therefore, this pact is very focused on solidarity and returns.  Ylva Johansson said during the press conference, held on the 23th of September, that this focus on returns is a way to improve a domain where the EU and Member States were not efficient. Besides, it helps to diminish the pressure on Member States of first arrival. However, this pact is criticized for having focused its strategy on preventing migrants to come or stay in Europe, instead of finding sustainable solutions to face a structural immigration that has become a European reality.

An already controversial pact: is it doomed to fail?

As soon as the New Pact was announced by the Commission, critics burst. Indeed, trying to find compromises between different and opposed interests revealed to be a tough game, and the New Pact is denounced as a patchwork of previous policies rather than an ambitious reform of the European migration and asylum system.

For experts and NGOs, this New Pact is too much focused on security approaches. According to Oxfam, the Commission “bows to anti-migration governments” [27], instead of having an ambitious and humane New Pact. Indeed, for this NGO, the propositions, such as the fast pre-screening procedure, or the development of partnerships with third party countries, will create more harm than solutions. As for the CNCD 11.11.11, “The EU’s new Asylum and Migration Pact draws no lessons from the past”[28]. The new system does not propose sustainable solutions. Instead, it privileges returns at the expense of sustainable hosting strategies that would prevent tragedies, such as the one of the Moria camp. For them, “The announced change of the Dublin Regulation is just correct in name, as the first countries of arrival will remain responsible for new arrivals”. Indeed, if new criteria are put in place, the overall majority of migrants are new on the continent, and so, they will become the responsibility of the first country of arrival. For Catherine Withol de Wenden, migrations are a structural phenomenon. Hence, the European Union will experience steady arrivals of migrants, but still, it will have to manage them. This is why the EU needs to create sustainable strategies to manage the reception of migrants, such as integration policies, instead of choosing rejection strategies[29].

Besides, CNCD 11.11.11 regrets that the Commission postponed the issue of legal migration to 2021, since it needs to be a significant part of the EU strategy regarding migration. A lot of irregular arrivals are caused by the fact that few legal immigration pathways exist in the EU. Therefore, some migrants use irregular routes in order to be able to make their claim in the EU. As Luca Jahier[30] said, the EU should guaranty “different legal pathways for populations in distress, such as resettlement programmes or humanitarian visas”[31]. It concerns also the labor market. As a matter of fact, a lot of irregular migrants apply for asylum, not because they are persecuted, but because it is the only way to attempt to enter the EU labor market. Therefore, along with welcoming high skilled workers, Member States and the EU should create others legal pathways for non-European workers. As the MEDAM Assessment Report puts it, “a sustainable asylum and migration policy needs both ingredients – ‘closing the back door’ of irregular immigration and ‘opening the front door’ of regular migration into labor markets”[32]. Answering this critic, Margaritis Schinas claimed that this matter has not been forgotten. It needs to be separated from the irregular migration issue. He also highlighted that “Legal migration is and always will be the voluntary prerogative of Member States, but it is one that can be supported by an EU framework and financing”[33]. Therefore, this issue will also depend on Member States’ interests. Besides, as we have demonstrated before, legal immigration must be linked to irregular migration, since both are interconnected. Finding solutions for one could solve the other.

As for some Member States, the New Pact does not give enough guaranties. Hungary expressed concerns regarding the security management of the external border with such propositions, whereas Giuseppe Conte, the chief of the Italian government, is skeptical regarding the real and effective implementation of this New Pact. France and Germany were the sole supporters of this New Pact, saying that it was a step forward towards more solidarity[34]. Rational hopes or fantasy? Time will tell, but this pact will face lots of challenges for sure.

The first one will be the endorsement by the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union. Without the approval of both of them, no legislative acts can be implemented, and so no Pact can see the light of day. However, as the number of critics since the release of the New Pact shows, this legislative process promises to be complicated. As Jean Quatremer puts it, when this migration package[35] will be discussed and revised by the States, we can fear that “only the most repressive aspects will remain”[36].

To conclude, this New Pact on migration and asylum, by trying to fit with the competing Member States’ interests, proposed a quite complex scheme. Now, one question remains: will it be sustainable? Indeed, the solidarity options are relevant “to balance out competing interests”[37] of Member States. However, relocating migrants is still an important matter, because without relocation, countries of first arrival are overwhelmed. Therefore, this scheme needs enough States that pledge for hosting refugees. If a majority of countries opt for the “return sponsorship” option, first countries of arrival will face the same issue as before: how to manage the integration of migrants that are granted international protection?

According to Schinas, this attempt to find a balance was made because “It is not the case that for some to win, others must lose. That is not – and never was – what Europe is about”[38]. Indeed, the European Union rests upon Member States which all have different interests. Its aim is to make all these interests work together. However, “The problems we see now on migration (…) are not because of Europe but because of the lack of Europe”[39]. Indeed, to make the European migration and asylum system evolve, and become more humane, Member States need to take a step forward and rise above their own interests for the sake of migrants, and above all, for the sake of the European construction. This breakthrough was experienced during the coronavirus pandemic when Member States launched “an economic recovery fund, funded by joint bonds based on the EU budget”[40]. An evidence that cooperation is not impossible.


[1] von der Leyen, Ursula, « State of the Union 2020”, European Commission, 2020, p.21

[2] According to Yves Pascouau, a researcher specializing in European immigration issues, « No, there is no migration crisis (…) The crisis today is political »

Free translation of the author « Non, il n’y a pas de crise migratoire (…) La crise est aujourd’hui d’ordre politique », Campistron, Marie, « Il n’y a pas de crise migratoire, mais une crise politique », L’OBS, 25 June 2018

[3] von der Leyen, Ursula, « Let’s make change happen: op-ed article by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission”, European Commission, 20 September 2020

[4] Apap, Johanna, et Radjenovic, Anja, « Briefing – Les politiques de l’Union – Au service des citoyens : La question migratoire », EPRS – Service de recherche du Parlement européen, Juin 2019, p.3

[5]Migration and Home Affairs, « Common European Asylum System”, European Commission, 2020

[6] Schmid-Drüner, Marion, « Immigration policy », European Parliament, 2019

[7]François, Jean-Baptiste, « Pacte européen sur les migrations, un projet dans l’impasse », La Croix, 12 June 2020

[8] “The phenomenon where an asylum seeker applies for asylum in more than one EU State or chooses one EU State in preference to others on the basis of a perceived higher standard of reception conditions or social security assistance.”, European Commission, “Asylum shopping”, European Commission, 2020

[9]Free translation of the author, « Le rapport entre les décisions en procédure Dublin et les demandes d’asile déposées était de 20 %, ce qui pourrait signifier qu’un nombre élevé de demandeurs d’une protection internationale ont continué d’effectuer des déplacements secondaires dans les pays de l’UE+ », European Asylum Support Office, « Rapport de l’EASO sur la situation de l’asile 2020 », EASO, 2020, p.15

[10]Harris, Chris, “Europe’s migrant crisis : Why Turkey let refugees head for EU and the link with Syria”, euronews, 4 March 2020

[11]BBC, “Europe migration : EU plans mandatory pact to « rebuild trust””, BBC News, 23 September 2020

[12] von der Leyen, Ursula, « Let’s make change happen: op-ed article by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission”, European Commission, 20 September 2020

[13] “The National Center for Development Cooperation (CNCD-11.11.11) coordinates the voice of 90 Belgian international solidarity NGOs and thousands of volunteers” 

Free translation of the author : « le Centre national de coopération au développement (CNCD-11.11.11) coordonne la voix de 90 ONG belges de solidarité internationale et de milliers de volontaires », CNCD 11.11.11, “Le CNCD-11.11.11 en bref», CNCD 11.11.11, 15 October 2017

[14] European Commission, “COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS on a New Pact on Migration and Asylum COM (2020) 609 final”, European Commission, 23 September 2020, p.5 

[15] Ibid

[16] Ibid, p.2

[17] Ibid

[18] Ibid

[19] AFP Infos Françaises, “Politique migratoire : Bruxelles dévoile sa réforme sous le feu des critiques », EUROPRESSE, 23 September 2020

[20] European Commission, “COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS on a New Pact on Migration and Asylum COM (2020) 609 final”, European Commission, 23 September 2020, p.5

[21] The distribution key takes into account “the size of the population”, “the total GDP of a Member State”, “Member States past efforts and (…)the number of asylum applications they receive”, European Commission, “New Pact on Migration and Asylum: Questions and Answers”, European Commission, 23 September 2020

[22]“Frontex, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, is an essential part of Europe’s efforts to safeguard the area of freedom, security and justice (…) Frontex monitors what is going on at the external borders, where support may be needed and how to react”, Leggeri, Fabrice, “Foreword”, Frontex, 2020

[23] “EURODAC (Identification of applicants) helps; by matching fingerprints to make it easier for EU States to determine responsibility for examining an asylum application by comparing fingerprint datasets. Since its creation in 2003 ; EURODAC has been used for asylum purposes only: when someone applies for asylum; no matter where they are in the EU or in any of the countries participating in this cooperation; their fingerprints are transmitted to the central database”, European Commission, “EURODAC (European Asylum Dactyloscopy Database)”, European Commission, 4 August 2020

[24] European Commission, “COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS on a New Pact on Migration and Asylum COM (2020) 609 final”, European Commission, 23 September 2020, p.4

[25]Agence Europe, “Entre fermeté et solidarité, la Commission cherche un chemin sur la réforme de l’asile et de la politique migratoire », Agence Europe, 23 September 2020

[26]Charente Libre, “Migrants : l’UE serre la vis », EUROPRESSE, 24 September 2020

[27] Oxfam France, « Nouveau Pacte européen d’asile et migration : à la recherche d’un consensus, la Commission européennes s’incline devant les gouvernements anti-migration », Oxfam France, 23 September 2020 

[28] CNCD 11.11.11, “Le Pacte Européen sur l’Asile et les Migrations ne tire aucune leçon de la « crise migratoire » », CNCD 11.11.11, 24 September 2020 

[29]Withol de Wenden, Catherine, “Un nouveau pacte européen sur l’immigration et l’asile pour répondre au « défi migratoire » », Fondation Robert Schuman, 25 November 2019

[30] President of the European Economic and Social Committee

[31]Free translation of the author, “d’autres filières de migration légale vers l’Union (…) par exemple des programmes de réinstallation ou des visas humanitaires », François, Jean-Baptiste, « Pacte européen sur les migrations, un projet dans l’impasse », La Croix, 12 June 2020

[32] Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), and Mercator Dialogue on Asylum and Migration (MEDAM), “2017 MEDAM Assessment Report on Asylum and Migration Policies in Europe – Sharing responsibility for refugees and expanding legal migration”, MEDAM, 2017, p.12

[33] Schinas, Margaritis, “Speech by Vice-President Schinas on the New Pact on Migration and Asylum”, European Commission, 23 September 2020 

[34] Réseau EURACTIV, “Le nouveau pacte migratoire fait des vagues au sein du navire européen », EURACTIV, 24 September 2020

[35] It must be adopted by a qualified majority (55% of the States representing 65% of the population)

[36]Free translation of the author « On peut craindre qu’une fois passés à la moulinette des Etats, qui doivent adopter ce paquet à la majorité qualifiée (55% des Etats représentant 65 % de la population), il ne reste que les aspects les plus répressifs », Quatremer, Jean, « Droit d’asile : Bruxelles rate son « pacte » », Libération, 22 September 2020

[37] Schinas, Margaritis, “Speech by Vice-President Schinas on the New Pact on Migration and Asylum”, European Commission, 23 September 2020 

[38] Ibid

[39]Ibid

[40]Ibid

______________________________________________

[VERSION FRANÇAISE]

« La migration constitue un défi européen et c’est l’ensemble de l’Europe qui doit faire sa part »[1], a déclaré Ursula von der Leyen dans son discours du 16 septembre 2020.

Comme elle l’a souligné, la migration est une question complexe en Europe, et doit être traitée de manière durable. C’est pourquoi, le 23 septembre, Ylva Johansson, commissaire aux affaires intérieures, et Margaritis Schinas, vice-président chargé de la promotion de notre mode de vie européen, ont publié le nouveau pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile qui vise à réformer le système précédent, qui a échoué.

Les questions portant sur la migration et l’asile ont été très importantes pour l’UE depuis la crise de 2015. Cette crise a remis en question l’intégrité de l’UE et sa capacité à s’unir pour parler d’une même voix sur cette question aussi bien interne qu’externe. Il s’agissait davantage d’une crise politique que d’une crise migratoire[2]. Par conséquent, la question de la migration et de l’asile n’est pas seulement une question de sensibilité à la crise humanitaire, mais elle concerne également l’UE dans son ensemble, son rayonnement sur la scène internationale. C’est pourquoi elle est devenue une question sensible, pour laquelle l’UE cherche encore des solutions. La Commission Juncker a réagi à la crise de 2015, et a tenté de mettre en place un système pour gérer l’important afflux de migrants. Cependant, cette crise a révélé la faiblesse d’un système européen d’asile et d’immigration qui ne pouvait pas faire face à la pression imposée par l’urgence du moment. Elle a révélé une Union européenne bloquée par les désaccords et l’incapacité des États membres à s’unir.

Ursula von der Leyen a fait de la question des migrations et de l’asile une pierre angulaire de son mandat. Elle est prête à proposer un nouveau pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile qui permettrait de se débarrasser du règlement de Dublin. Elle a affirmé que ce pacte sera plus humain et plus juste[3]. Toutefois, les critiques de ce nouveau pacte montrent qu’elle, et les deux commissaires qui ont porté le projet, sont liés par la volonté des États membres.

Migration et asile : une impasse européenne

Des compétences partagées entre l’Union européenne et les États membres

Dans le domaine de la migration et de l’asile, l’UE et les États membres partagent leurs compétences.

En effet, l’Union européenne fixe des normes communes grâce à de nombreux règlements et directives, mais la mise en œuvre effective des politiques d’asile et de migration relève de la responsabilité des États membres, qui doivent veiller à ce que leur législation nationale soit conforme au droit communautaire et aux accords internationaux[4]

Par exemple, l’Union européenne a essayé d’harmoniser les lois des États membres sur l’asile avec la création du Régime d’Asile Européen Commun (RAEC). Il fixe les règles minimales dans le domaine de l’asile pour les États membres en ce qui concerne le traitement des demandes d’asile et des personnes demandant une protection. Le RAEC repose sur plusieurs directives et règlements[5]. L’un d’eux est le règlement de Dublin révisé. C’est le plus controversé. Il fixe la règle générale de répartition des demandeurs d’asile dans les États membres. Le règlement de Dublin stipule qu’une demande d’asile doit être traitée dans le premier pays d’arrivée. Comme nous le verrons plus bas, ce système a été critiqué parce qu’il fait peser la charge du traitement des demandes d’asile sur les pays qui se trouvent aux frontières extérieures de l’UE, comme la Grèce, l’Italie, l’Espagne ou les pays d’Europe de l’Est.

En outre, le traité de Lisbonne prévoit que les politiques migratoires dans les pays de l’Union européenne s’appuient sur les principes de solidarité et de partage des responsabilités (article 80 du Traité sur le fonctionnement de l’UE (TFUE))[6].

Il existe donc un cadre juridique européen pour gérer les migrations et l’asile. Dès lors, pourquoi l’immigration et l’asile sont-ils devenus un problème pour l’UE ?

La réponse réside tout d’abord dans le fait que les États membres construisent leurs propres politiques migratoires et d’asile, sur la base de ce cadre législatif. En effet, si les règlements sont des actes législatifs contraignants, les directives sont des actes législatifs qui se contentent de fixer des objectifs, et laissent les États membres mettre en œuvre ces objectifs comme ils le souhaitent. Ainsi, les politiques de chaque État membre en matière de migration et d’asile sont différentes, ce qui crée des obstacles à la construction d’un système commun et efficace. En outre, même si les règlements sont contraignants, le délai pour sanctionner les États qui ne les respecteraient pas est très long. Cela rend les sanctions moins efficaces. Par exemple, la Hongrie, la Pologne et la République tchèque ont été condamnées par la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne, pour avoir refusé de participer au système de relocalisation de 2015 (qui a été voté par l’Union européenne), seulement le 2 avril 2020[7]. Cette sanction est donc arrivée cinq ans après la crise, quand le système de relocalisation n’était plus mis en œuvre. Cela donne donc l’image que les États membres peuvent se comporter comme ils le souhaitent, en toute impunité.

Ainsi, même si l’UE a essayé de construire un système commun, l’asile et la politique migratoire sont des domaines où les législations des États membres prévalent. Le partage des compétences crée un blocage dans la mise en œuvre d’un système européen commun. En effet, l’UE a besoin que les États membres soient sur la même longueur d’onde afin de faire avancer ses politiques migratoires et d’asile, ce qui est loin d’être le cas.

Le règlement de Dublin : une vitrine de l’échec du système d’asile européen

L’incendie du camp de Moria, le 9 septembre, a rappelé de façon choquante l’échec du système européen. En effet, ce règlement qui a été créé pour éviter le « asylum shopping »[8], a développé, de fait, des inégalités entre les États membres dans la gestion des flux migratoires. Les failles de ce règlement sont apparues lors de la crise de 2015, lorsque l’Union européenne a été soudainement submergée par un afflux de personnes en quête de protection internationale, notamment les pays de l’Est et du Sud de l’Union Européenne. Cela a conduit à la fermeture des frontières, comme en Hongrie, et a suscité la méfiance et le ressentiment des États membres. Ainsi, les pays qui étaient placés aux frontières extérieures de l’UE ont été de plus en plus dépassés par l’arrivée de migrants, sans avoir suffisamment de ressources pour s’occuper d’eux. Il en a résulté l’apparition de camps où les conditions de vie sont inhumaines, et les droits de l’homme non respectés.

L’échec du règlement de Dublin a montré les failles d’un système migratoire et d’asile qui repose sur le principe de solidarité pour relocaliser les personnes qui se verraient accorder l’asile, ou pour les renvoyer dans leur pays d’origine. Cependant, ce principe n’a pas survécu aux intérêts concurrents des États membres. En outre, les États qui accueillaient des migrants ont été débordés. Par exemple, en 2019  » Le rapport entre les décisions en procédure Dublin et les demandes d’asile déposées était de 20 %, ce qui pourrait signifier qu’un nombre élevé́ de demandeurs d’une protection internationale ont continué́ d’effectuer des déplacements secondaires dans les pays de l’UE+ « [9]. Cela témoigne d’un système qui n’a pas su gérer correctement l’afflux de migrants.

Le groupe de Visegrad, composé de la Pologne, la Hongrie, la République tchèque et la Slovaquie, a refusé de reloger les réfugiés et a fait pression pour une solidarité volontaire. Les pays du Sud, comme la Grèce, l’Italie ou l’Espagne, qui accueillent des migrants et se sont sentis abandonnés par les autres États membres face à cette responsabilité, affirment que le principe de solidarité devrait être obligatoire, et que le règlement de Dublin est injuste.  Ce manque de coopération entre les États membres a fragilisé l’Union européenne dans son ensemble.

C’est pourquoi la Commission Juncker a tenté de répondre à la crise en mettant en place plusieurs instruments pour gérer l’afflux de migrants. Cette réponse a été définie comme une externalisation de la politique migratoire, car les mesures mises en place visaient principalement à protéger la frontière extérieure et à prévenir la migration irrégulière. Pour ce faire, la Commission Juncker s’est appuyée sur Frontex (l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes), mais aussi sur des accords avec des pays tiers. Par exemple, un accord a été conclu avec la Turquie : en échange de fonds pour le développement, la Turquie doit accueillir les migrants et les empêcher de traverser la Méditerranée. Cependant, si cette solution était bonne pour soulager la pression sur les pays européens, elle est également devenue un outil de chantage politique. En effet, le 27 février 2020, le président turc, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, a commencé à laisser entrer les migrants dans l’UE, violant ainsi l’accord UE-Turquie. Cette décision a été prise suite à la mort de 33 soldats turcs lors d’un raid aérien du gouvernement syrien. C’était un moyen d’attirer l’attention sur la crise syrienne et ses conséquences, mais aussi de faire pression sur l’UE pour qu’elle poursuive son financement[10].

Ainsi, le cadre européen de gestion des migrations, mis en place dans l’urgence de la crise, a révélé des failles créant des tensions entre les États membres. C’est pourquoi il devait être réformé.

Un nouveau pacte ambitieux s’arrête là où commence la souveraineté des États membres

Au cours des cinq dernières années, l’afflux de migrants en Europe a considérablement diminué[11].

Dès lors, il est venu le temps de réfléchir à une politique européenne de migration et d’asile pour le long terme. Avant de proposer un nouveau pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile, Ylva Johansson et Margaritis Schinas se sont rendus dans les États membres pour recueillir leur avis et leurs souhaits concernant le nouveau pacte. Cette approche visait à créer un système plus inclusif et durable qui répondra à tous leurs intérêts. Toutefois, essayer de répondre à toutes les demandes peut conduire à des compromis difficiles et à des blocages pour créer un système de migration et d’asile plus humain et efficace.

Le nouveau pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile : trouver un équilibre entre les intérêts des États membres

Dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union, Ursula von der Leyen a promis un système plus humain et plus juste[12]. En élaborant le nouveau pacte, Ylva Johansson et Margaritis Schinas ont dû trouver un équilibre entre une approche humaine, respectant les droits de l’homme et la dignité humaine, et une approche sécuritaire, protégeant la frontière extérieure. En effet, l’approche sécuritaire est le seul point de consensus entre les États membres, mais certaines organisations de la société civile, comme Oxfam et le CNCD 11.11.11[13], demandent une approche plus humaine.

Tout d’abord, le nouveau pacte prévoit un mécanisme de solidarité à travers trois options de contribution :

  • La « relocalisation des migrants »[14]
  • Le « parrainage en matière de retour »[15], c’est-à-dire « les États membres fourniraient à l’État membre sous pression toute l’aide nécessaire pour procéder au retour rapide des personnes n’ayant pas le droit de séjourner dans l’Union »[16]. Cette procédure de retour doit avoir lieu dans les 8 mois suivant la décision, sinon l’État membre responsable devra réinstaller la personne sur son territoire.
  • « Soutien opérationnel »[17], comme le soutien à la construction de logements pour les migrants, la mise à disposition de garde-côtes, etc. 

Le nouveau pacte apporte des réponses adaptées à trois types de situations :

  • Situation « de recherche et de sauvetage »[18] : dans ce cas, les États membres pourront choisir les trois options de solidarité. Un groupe d’États volontaires sera créé pour la relocalisation des migrants. En outre, les ONG qui participent à des opérations de sauvetage en mer ne seront pas poursuivies en justice.
  • Situation « de pression »[19] sur le système de gestion des migrations d’un État membre  
  • Situations « de crise »[20] 

Ces trois situations appellent des réponses différentes. Par exemple, si un État membre est sous pression en raison d’un afflux important de migrants, il peut déclencher un « mécanisme de solidarité obligatoire »[21]. Dans ce cas, la Commission organise la gestion de la crise. Un plan de répartition, calculé grâce à une « clé de répartition »[22], déterminera la part équitable des États membres[23]. Sur cette base, chacun peut choisir de relocaliser les réfugiés sur son territoire ou de parrainer les retours, et aussi d’apporter un soutien opérationnel. Ce mécanisme est censé être mis en œuvre par un acte contraignant, que chaque État membre devra respecter. Par conséquent, ce mécanisme est conçu pour répondre aux demandes des pays d’Europe du Sud, qui dénonçaient le manque de soutien des autres États membres. Le choix entre la relocalisation ou le retour sponsorisé est également un moyen de s’adapter au refus du groupe de Visegrad d’accepter les migrants relocalisés.

En ce qui concerne les retours, dans le cas où une personne n’obtiendrait pas de protection internationale, la Commission souhaite une meilleure implication de Frontex[24]. En outre, les accords de réadmission seront encouragés par des mesures d’incitation en matière de commerce, de développement ou de visas. Un réseau d’experts sera mis en place pour aider les États membres dans le processus de retour.

Afin de rendre les contrôles aux frontières extérieures plus efficaces, le nouveau pacte prévoit une procédure d’identification de cinq jours maximum, comprenant l’enregistrement des empreintes digitales dans le système EURODAC[25] et des contrôles de santé et de sécurité[26]. En outre, pour les migrants considérés comme peu susceptibles d’obtenir une protection internationale, la demande d’asile sera traitée à la frontière dans un délai de douze semaines[27]. Quant au règlement de Dublin, il sera révisé. Le pays responsable de la demande peut être le pays où le migrant a des liens familiaux, où il a travaillé ou étudié, ou le pays qui a déjà délivré un visa dans le passé. Dans le cas contraire, le pays d’entrée reste responsable de la demande[28]. Ces propositions sont faites afin d’éviter les camps surpeuplés où les droits de l’homme et la dignité humaine sont bafoués.

Ce pacte est donc très axé sur la solidarité et l’organisation des retours. Ylva Johansson a déclaré, lors de la conférence de presse du 23 septembre, que cette focalisation sur les retours est un moyen d’améliorer un domaine dans lequel l’UE et les États membres n’ont pas été efficaces. En outre, elle contribue à réduire la pression sur les États membres situés à la frontière extérieure de l’UE. Toutefois, ce pacte est critiqué pour avoir axé sa stratégie sur la prévention de l’arrivée ou sur le retour des migrants en Europe, au lieu de trouver des solutions durables pour faire face à une immigration structurelle qui est devenue une réalité européenne.

Un pacte déjà controversé : est-il voué à l’échec ?

Dès que le nouveau pacte a été annoncé par la Commission, les critiques se sont multipliées. En effet, la recherche de compromis entre des intérêts différents et opposés s’est révélée être une stratégie difficile, et le nouveau pacte est dénoncé comme un rapiècement de politiques antérieures plutôt qu’une réforme ambitieuse du système européen d’immigration et d’asile.

Pour les experts et les ONG, ce nouveau pacte est trop axé sur les approches sécuritaires. Selon Oxfam, la Commission « s’incline devant les gouvernements anti-migration »[29], au lieu d’avoir un nouveau pacte ambitieux et humain. En effet, pour cette ONG, les propositions, telles que la procédure de présélection plus rapide, ou le développement de partenariats avec des pays tiers, créeront plus de dommages que de solutions. Pour CNCD 11.11.11, « Le nouveau Pacte Asile et Migrations ne tire aucune leçon du passé »[30]. En effet, le nouveau système ne propose pas de solutions durables. Il privilégie plutôt les retours au détriment de stratégies d’accueil durables qui permettraient d’éviter des tragédies, comme celle du camp Moria. Pour eux, « Le changement annoncé du Règlement de Dublin l’est juste de nom, car les premiers pays d’entrée resteront responsables des nouveaux arrivés »[31]. En effet, si de nouveaux critères sont mis en place, la majorité des individus en quête de protection internationale resteront la responsabilité du premier pays d’arrivée. Pour Catherine Withol de Wenden, les migrations sont un phénomène structurel. Ainsi, l’Union européenne connaîtra des arrivées régulières d’immigrants, mais elle devra néanmoins les prendre en charge. C’est pourquoi l’UE doit créer des stratégies durables pour gérer l’accueil de ces personnes, telles que des politiques d’intégration, au lieu de choisir des stratégies de rejet[32].

Par ailleurs, le CNCD 11.11.11 regrette que la Commission ait reporté la question de l’immigration légale à 2021, car elle doit constituer une partie importante de la stratégie de l’UE en matière de migration. Beaucoup d’arrivées irrégulières sont dues au fait qu’il existe peu de voies d’immigration légale dans l’UE. Par conséquent, certains migrants utilisent des voies irrégulières afin de pouvoir faire valoir leurs droits dans l’UE. Comme l’a déclaré Luca Jahier[33], l’UE devrait garantir « d’autres filières de migration légale vers l’Union (…) par exemple des programmes de réinstallation ou des visas humanitaires »[34]. Cela concerne également le marché du travail. En effet, de nombreux migrants en situation irrégulière demandent l’asile, non pas parce qu’ils sont persécutés, mais parce qu’il s’agit de leur unique chance d’entrer sur le marché du travail de l’UE. C’est pourquoi, en plus d’accueillir des travailleurs hautement qualifiés, les États membres et l’UE devraient créer d’autres voies légales pour les travailleurs non européens. Comme l’indique le rapport d’évaluation du MEDAM, « une politique d’asile et de migration durable nécessite les deux ingrédients suivants : « fermer la porte de derrière » de l’immigration clandestine et « ouvrir la porte de devant » de l’immigration régulière sur les marchés du travail »[35]. En réponse à cette critique, Margaritis Schinas a affirmé que cette question n’a pas été oubliée, mais doit être séparée de la question de l’immigration clandestine. Il a également souligné que « l’immigration légale est et sera toujours la prérogative volontaire des États membres, mais elle peut être soutenue par un cadre et un financement de l’UE »[36]. Par conséquent, cette question dépendra également des intérêts des États membres. En outre, comme nous l’avons déjà démontré, cette question doit être liée à celle de l’immigration clandestine, car les deux sont connectées. Trouver des solutions pour l’une pourrait résoudre l’autre.

Concernant les États membres, le nouveau pacte ne donne pas suffisamment de garanties.   La Hongrie a exprimé des inquiétudes concernant la gestion de la sécurité de la frontière extérieure avec de telles propositions, tandis que Giuseppe Conte, le chef du gouvernement italien, est sceptique quant à la mise en œuvre réelle et efficace de ce nouveau pacte. La France et l’Allemagne ont été les seuls à soutenir ce nouveau pacte, affirmant qu’il s’agissait d’un pas en avant vers plus de solidarité[37]. Espoirs rationnels ou fantaisie ? Le temps nous le dira, mais ce pacte devra certainement faire face à de nombreux défis.

Le premier sera d’être approuvé par le Parlement européen et le Conseil de l’Union européenne. Sans l’approbation des deux, aucun acte législatif ne peut être mis en œuvre, et donc aucun pacte ne peut voir le jour. Toutefois, comme le montre la quantité de critiques formulées depuis la publication du nouveau pacte, ce processus législatif promet d’être compliqué. Comme le dit Jean Quatremer, « On peut craindre qu’une fois passés à la moulinette des Etats, qui doivent adopter ce paquet à la majorité qualifiée (55% des Etats représentant 65 % de la population), il ne reste que les aspects les plus répressifs »[38].

Conclusion

Ce nouveau pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile, en essayant de s’adapter aux intérêts concurrents des États membres, propose, de fait, un schéma assez complexe. Cependant, une question demeure : sera-t-il durable ? En effet, les options de solidarité sont pertinentes pour « équilibrer les intérêts concurrents »[39] des États membres. Toutefois, la relocalisation des migrants reste une question importante. Sans relocalisation, les États dans lesquels les migrants arrivent en premier sont débordés. C’est pourquoi ce système a besoin d’un nombre suffisant d’États qui s’engagent à accueillir des réfugiés. Si une majorité de pays optent pour l’option du « parrainage de retour », les pays de première arrivée seront confrontés à la même question qu’auparavant : comment gérer l’intégration des migrants qui bénéficient d’une protection internationale ?

Selon M. Schinas, cette tentative de trouver un équilibre a été faite parce que « il n’est pas vrai que pour que certains gagnent, d’autres doivent perdre. Ce n’est pas – et n’a jamais été – l’objet de l’Europe »[40]. En effet, l’Union européenne repose sur des États membres qui ont tous des intérêts différents. Son but est de faire en sorte que tous ces intérêts se rejoignent. Toutefois, « les problèmes que nous constatons actuellement en matière d’immigration (…) ne sont pas dus à l’Europe mais à l’absence d’Europe »[41]. Dès lors, pour faire évoluer le système européen d’immigration et d’asile et le rendre plus humain, les États membres doivent faire un pas en avant et dépasser leurs propres intérêts pour le bien des migrants, et surtout pour le bien de la construction européenne. Cette percée a été réalisée lors de la pandémie de coronavirus, lorsque les États membres ont lancé « un fonds de relance économique financé par des obligations communes sur la base du budget de l’UE »[42]. Une preuve que la coopération n’est pas impossible.

______________________________________________

[1] von der Leyen, Ursula, « Discours sur l’état de l’Union de la présidente von der Leyen en session plénière du Parlement européen », Commission Européenne, 18 Septembre 2020, p.21

[2] Selon Yves Pascouau, chercheur spécialiste des questions européennes en matière d’immigration, «Non, il n’y a pas de crise migratoire (…) La crise est aujourd’hui d’ordre politique », Campistron, Marie, « Il n’y a pas de crise migratoire, mais une crise politique », L’OBS, 25 juin 2018

[3] “It will take a human and humane approach”, von der Leyen, Ursula, « Let’s make change happen: op-ed article by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission”, European Commission, 20 septembre 2020

[4] Apap, Johanna, et Radjenovic, Anja, « Briefing – Les politiques de l’Union – Au service des citoyens : La question migratoire », EPRS – Service de recherche du Parlement européen, Juin 2019, p.3

[5] Migration and Home Affairs, « Common European Asylum System”, European Commission, 2020

[6] Schmid-Drüner, Marion, « Immigration policy », European Parliament, 2019

[7] François, Jean-Baptiste, « Pacte européen sur les migrations, un projet dans l’impasse », La Croix, 12 juin 2020

[8] « Le phénomène selon lequel un demandeur d’asile demande l’asile dans plus d’un État de l’UE ou choisit un État de l’UE de préférence à d’autres sur la base d’un niveau perçu comme plus élevé de conditions d’accueil ou d’assistance en matière de sécurité sociale », European Commission, “Asylum shopping”, European Commission, 2020

[9] European Asylum Support Office, « Rapport de l’EASO sur la situation de l’asile 2020 », EASO, 2020, p.15

[10] Harris, Chris, “Europe’s migrant crisis : Why Turkey let refugees head for EU and the link with Syria”, euronews, 4 mars 2020

[11] BBC, “Europe migration : EU plans mandatory pact to « rebuild trust””, BBC News, 23 septembre 2020

[12] von der Leyen, Ursula, « Let’s make change happen: op-ed article by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission”, European Commission, 20 September 2020

[13] « le Centre national de coopération au développement (CNCD-11.11.11) coordonne la voix de 90 ONG belges de solidarité internationale et de milliers de volontaires », CNCD 11.11.11, “Le CNCD-11.11.11 en bref», CNCD 11.11.11, 15 octobre 2017

[14] Commission européenne, “COMMUNICATION DE LA COMMISSION AU PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN, AU CONSEIL, AU COMITÉ ÉCONOMIQUE ET SOCIAL EUROPÉEN ET AU COMITÉ DES RÉGIONS sur un nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile – COM (2020) 609 final », Commission européenne, 23 septembre 2020, p.6

[15] Ibid

[16] Ibid

[17] Ibid, p.7

[18] Ibid, p.3

[19] Ibid

[20] Ibid

[21] AFP Infos Françaises, “Politique migratoire : Bruxelles dévoile sa réforme sous le feu des critiques », EUROPRESSE, 23 septembre 2020

[22] Commission européenne, “COMMUNICATION DE LA COMMISSION AU PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN, AU CONSEIL, AU COMITÉ ÉCONOMIQUE ET SOCIAL EUROPÉEN ET AU COMITÉ DES RÉGIONS sur un nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile – COM (2020) 609 final », Commission européenne, 23 septembre 2020, p.6

[23]Cette clé de répartition prendra en compte « la taille de la population », « le PIB total d’un État membre », les « efforts déployés par les États membres dans le passé », et « le nombre de demandes d’asile qu’ils reçoivent », Commission européenne, « Nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile: questions et réponses », Commission européenne, 23 septembre 2020

[24] « Frontex, l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de gardes-côtes, a été créée en 2004 pour aider les États membres de l’UE et les pays associés à l’espace Schengen à protéger les frontières extérieures de l’espace de libre circulation de l’UE », Frontex, « Qu’est ce que Frontex ? », Frontex, 2020

[25] « Eurodac, c’est le nom de la base de données qui répertorie les empreintes digitales de tous les demandeurs d’asile et immigrés illégaux. Elle permet de savoir si une personne a déjà demandé l’asile dans un autre pays européen, ou est entrée illégalement dans l’Union européenne », Parlement européen, « EURODAC et les nouvelles règles d’asile: une meilleure protection pour tous », Parlement européen, 23 avril 2013

[26] Commission européenne, “COMMUNICATION DE LA COMMISSION AU PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN, AU CONSEIL, AU COMITÉ ÉCONOMIQUE ET SOCIAL EUROPÉEN ET AU COMITÉ DES RÉGIONS sur un nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile – COM (2020) 609 final », Commission européenne, 23 septembre 2020, p.4

[27] Agence Europe, “Entre fermeté et solidarité, la Commission cherche un chemin sur la réforme de l’asile et de la politique migratoire », Agence Europe, 23 septembre 2020

[28] Charente Libre, “Migrants : l’UE serre la vis », EUROPRESSE, 24 septembre 2020

[29] Oxfam France, « Nouveau Pacte européen d’asile et migration : à la recherche d’un consensus, la Commission européennes s’incline devant les gouvernements anti-migration », Oxfam France, 23 septembre 2020

[30]CNCD 11.11.11, “Le Pacte Européen sur l’Asile et les Migrations ne tire aucune leçon de la « crise migratoire » », CNCD 11.11.11, 24 septembre 2020

[31] Ibid

[32] Withol de Wenden, Catherine, “Un nouveau pacte européen sur l’immigration et l’asile pour répondre au « défi migratoire » », Fondation Robert Schuman, 25 novembre 2019

[33] Président du Comité économique et social européen

[34] François, Jean-Baptiste, « Pacte européen sur les migrations, un projet dans l’impasse », La Croix, 12 juin 2020

[35] Traduction libre de l’auteur, “a sustainable asylum and migration policy needs both ingredients – ‘closing the back door’ of irregular immigration and ‘opening the front door’ of regular migration into labor markets”, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), and Mercator Dialogue on Asylum and Migration (MEDAM), “2017 MEDAM Assessment Report on Asylum and Migration Policies in Europe – Sharing responsibility for refugees and expanding legal migration”, MEDAM, 2017, p.12

[36] Traduction libre de l’auteur, that “Legal migration is and always will be the voluntary prerogative of Member States but it is one that can be supported by an EU framework and financing”, Schinas, Margaritis, “Speech by Vice-President Schinas on the New Pact on Migration and Asylum”, European Commission, 23 septembre 2020

[37] Réseau EURACTIV, “Le nouveau pacte migratoire fait des vagues au sein du navire européen », EURACTIV, 24 septembre 2020

[38] Quatremer, Jean, « Droit d’asile : Bruxelles rate son « pacte » », Libération, 22 septembre 2020

[39] Traduction libre de l’auteur “to balance out competing interests”, Schinas, Margaritis, “Speech by Vice-President Schinas on the New Pact on Migration and Asylum”, European Commission, 23 septembre 2020

[40] Traduction libre de l’auteur “It is not the case that for some to win, others must lose. That is not – and never was – what Europe is about”, Ibid

[41] Traduction libre de l’auteur “The problems we see now on migration (…) are not because of Europe but because of the lack of Europe”, Ibid

[42] Traduction libre de l’auteur “an economic recovery fund funded by joint bonds based on the EU budget”, Ibid

______________________________________________

For further information / Pour aller plus loin :

New Pact on Migration and Asylum / Nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile:

  • Commission européenne, “COMMUNICATION DE LA COMMISSION AU PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN, AU CONSEIL, AU COMITÉ ÉCONOMIQUE ET SOCIAL EUROPÉEN ET AU COMITÉ DES RÉGIONS sur un nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile – COM (2020) 609 final », Commission européenne, 23 septembre 2020 (version française)
  • European Commission, “COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS on a New Pact on Migration and Asylum COM (2020) 609 final”, European Commission, 23 September 2020 (english version)

Règlement de Dublin / Dublin regulation :

  • Convention relative à la détermination de l’État responsable de l’examen d’une demande d’asile présentée dans l’un des États membres des Communautés européennes – Convention de Dublin, Journal officiel n° C 254 du 19/08/1997 (version française)

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/FR/TXT/HTML/?uri=CELEX:41997A0819(01)&from=EN

  • CONVENTION determining the State responsible for examining applications for asylum lodged in one of the Member States of the European Communities, Official Journal n° C 254, 19.8.97 (english version)

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:41997A0819(01)&from=DE

  • Règlement (CE) n° 343/2003 du Conseil du 18 février 2003 établissant les critères et mécanismes de détermination de l’État membre responsable de l’examen d’une demande d’asile présentée dans l’un des États membres par un ressortissant d’un pays tiers  
    Journal officiel n° L 050 du 25/02/2003 (version française)

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32003R0343:FR:HTML

  • COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 343/2003 of 18 February 2003 establishing the criteria and mechanisms for determining the Member State responsible for exam- ining an asylum application lodged in one of the Member States by a third-country national, Official Journal n° L 050, 25.2.2003 (english version)

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32003R0343&from=EN

  • RÈGLEMENT (UE) No 604/2013 DU PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN ET DU CONSEIL du 26 juin 2013 établissant les critères et mécanismes de détermination de l’État membre responsable de l’examen d’une demande de protection internationale introduite dans l’un des États membres par un ressortissant de pays tiers ou un apatride (refonte), Journal Officiel n° L 180du 29/06/2013 (version française)

  • REGULATION (EU) No 604/2013 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 26 June 2013 establishing the criteria and mechanisms for determining the Member State responsible for examining an application for international protection lodged in one of the Member States by a third-country national or a stateless person (recast), Official Journal n° L 180, 29.6.2013 (english version)

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32013R0604&from=en

Anne-Lise Tabaud

Étudiante dans le Master de Relations Internationales à Sciences Po Bordeaux, je suis intéressée par les politiques de développement international. J'ai notamment pour ambition de me perfectionner sur les questions liées à la gestion et à la protection des réfugiés dans le monde, et particulièrement en Europe. À travers mon travail d'analyste politique à EU-Logos Athéna, je souhaite apporter un éclairage sur les actions que l'Union Européenne et ses États membres mènent dans le domaine de la migration et de l'asile.

Laisser un commentaire

Fermer le menu