Gender perspective in European migration policies

Gender perspective in European migration policies

[VERSION FRANCAISE PLUS BAS]

On the 1st of December, 2020, for the launch of the report From Promise to Action : The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations declared that “Many of those providing essential health and care services are migrant women. They must no longer be invisible”[1]. Indeed, the COVID crisis has revealed that migrants, and especially migrant women, are part of the essential workers[2], but they are still left behind by gender-blind migration policies. Thus, taking a gender perspective on migration policies is important because “It enables policy-makers to develop policies with an understanding of the socio-economic reality of women and men and allows for policies to take (gender) differences into account”[3]. Therefore, it is done to achieve gender equality, which is the Fifth Sustainable Development Goal[4] adopted by the United Nations Member States, included the European Union, in 2015[5]. As the European Institute for Gender Equality highlights:

“Gender equality implies that the interests, needs and priorities of both women and men are taken into consideration, recognizing the diversity of different groups of women and men. Gender equality is not a women’s issue but should concern and fully engage men as well as women. Equality between women and men is seen both as a human rights issue and as a precondition for, and indicator of, sustainable people-centered development”[6]

Therefore, gender equality as a standard for sustainable development is recognized, but not always applied in European policies, and especially the migration ones. They are often “one-size-fits-all approach(es)”[7] that do not take into account that migrant groups are highly diverse, and especially when we take men and women. Indeed, men and women are not going to experience the same difficulties on the migration routes, or when it comes to integration. Therefore, migration policies will not have the same effects on different groups, and in this case on men or women.

It is why in this article we will try to demonstrate that taking a gender perspective in the policy-making field, and especially in European migration policies, leads to more gender sensitive and efficient policies, and helps to achieve gender equality.

Gender mainstreaming in the European Union

What is gender mainstreaming?

Gender mainstreaming “involves the integration of a gender perspective into the preparation, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies, regulatory measures and spending programmes”[8]. It is not so much as a goal but more as a method to achieve the goal, which is gender equality. It is about changing the procedures, in order to modernize the policy-making process. Gender mainstreaming helps to think about policies that will take into account the different needs of men and women. An example of gender mainstreaming in urban policies is to put “additional lighting (…) to make walking at night safer for women”[9].

This new way of thinking about the policymaking process emerged when policymakers realized that taking gender as a separate issue does not work, since gender inequalities are present in different areas, such as in the labor market, in migration, in politics, or even in urban planning. Hence, the need to take a gender perspective when drafting policies.

Gender mainstreaming in the European Union

In the European Union, gender mainstreaming is taken into account both in the European Commission and the European Parliament.

In the European Commission, the Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers, is in charge of implementing gender mainstreaming across all Directorate-Generals of the Commission. Its Gender Equality Unit (Unit D.2), led by Irena Moozova[10], the current director for Equality and Union Citizenship, is in charge of helping other DGs to include a gender perspective in their activities, and oversees the Inter-Service Group on Gender Equality (ISG). This Inter-Service counts members from all Commission’s DGs and services, and “coordinates the implementation of actions for equality between women and men in the policies and annual work programmes for their respective policy areas”[11].

Besides, on March 5th, 2020, the Commission released its Gender Equality Strategy 2020-2025, reinforcing the Commission willingness to integrate gender mainstreaming in the Commission’s work. As it puts forward, “The implementation of this strategy will be based on the dual approach of targeted measures to achieve gender equality, combined with strengthened gender mainstreaming”[12]. It also includes an intersectional gender approach in its strategy, because “Women are a heterogeneous group and may face intersectional discrimination based on several personal characteristics”[13].

As for the European Parliament, the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (FEMM) is one of the parliamentary committees of the European Parliament. According to the European Institute for Gender Equality, “FEMM plays a crucial role in advancing gender equality in the EU through legislating and influencing the European political agenda in the area of equality between women and men and women’s rights”[14].

European institutions have acknowledged the need for gender equality. Consequently, they try to integrate gender perspective in all policies. However, in the field of migration, gender inequalities still remain.

Gender inequalities in the field of migration: how to overcome them?

Migrant women, as immigrants, asylum seekers or refugees, experience gender inequalities in the different steps of their journey. We will expose three different domains where migrant women face gender inequalities: on the migration routes and reception, accommodation and detention facilities, regarding international protection, and when it comes to socio-economic integration in the host country.  

Migration routes and reception, accommodation and detention facilities

Gender-based violence and trafficking on migration routes

Migrant women and girls, both asylum seekers or migrant workers, experience gender inequalities on migration routes. During their journey, they face many dangers related to gender-based violence[15]. From sexual harassment to rape and trafficking in persons, they live in constant insecurity. For example, “Hala, a 23-year-old woman from Aleppo, told Amnesty International: « At the hotel in Turkey, one of the men working with the smuggler, a Syrian, told me that if I slept with him, I wouldn’t pay or I would pay less. Of course, I said no, it was disgusting. We all experienced the same thing in Jordan.””[16]. Besides, according to The 5th Review of the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States draft report, “In Ireland, a study on separated migrant girl children found 60 % of them to be victims of sexual or other forms of violence”[17].

Regarding trafficking in person, both women and men migrants are vulnerable regarding “trafficking, forced labour or grave exploitation, such as (…) sex slavery”[18]. However, women and girls remain the most vulnerable when it comes to trafficking in persons (Figure 1)[19], and especially when these women and girls are migrants. For example, “in 2017 the International Organization for Migration (IOM) reported that Italy had experienced an almost 600% increase since 2014 in the number of potential victims of trafficking for the purpose of sexual exploitation arriving through the Central Mediterranean route, mostly Nigerian girls aged 15 to 17 years”[20].

Figure 1

Taking a gender perspective on trafficking permits to understand that men and women, and especially migrants, are affected by trafficking, modern slavery or exploitation in different ways. According to David and al., “Whereas women are disproportionately victims of forced labour in the private economy (including in domestic work and in commercial sexual exploitation) and forced marriage, men are disproportionately subject to state- imposed forms of forced labour, (…) as well as to forced labour in the construction, manufacturing and agriculture sectors”[21].  Thus, gender mainstreaming is important, in order to respond to men and women migrants’ different vulnerabilities in a proper manner.

Insecurity and gender-blind reception, accommodation and detention facilities

Migrant women and girls, when they managed to overcome the obstacles of the migration routes and reach Europe, still face gender inequalities or gender-based violence and insecurity in accommodation, reception and detention facilities. A lot of reception facilities do not have separate areas for men and women, leading the latter to feel insecure. For example, “Reem, 20, who was traveling with his 15-year-old cousin, said : »I never slept in the camps. I was too afraid that someone would touch me. The tents were all mixed and I witnessed violence (…) I felt safer when I was on the move, especially on a bus, the only place I could close my eyes and sleep. In the camps, there is so much risk of being touched, and the women can’t really complain and don’t want to cause problems that could disrupt their journey.””[22].

Besides, a lot of migrant women, due to their culture or husbands, do not feel comfortable being treated by male doctors, or dealing with male staff. For instance, in the Borići site in Bosnia and Herzegovina, “it was not uncommon for them (migrant women) or for their husbands to refuse medical consultations by male doctors, especially gynecologists. In the absence of female specialists, access to healthcare for refugee and migrant women remains difficult”[23].

What can be implemented to deal with these specific problems that women and girls face as migrants?

The case of Belgian reception centers gives an example of how gender mainstreaming can be used in migration policy. To respond to gender inequalities and give gender sensitive reception conditions, in Belgium, there are “70 places in 21 apartments for single women with children and 40 places in a specialized center for unaccompanied pregnant girls and young mothers”[24]. It permits to provide these women and girls the assistance they need in safe conditions and designed treatments for their specific needs.

International protection

Article 1 paragraph 2 of the 1951 Refugee Convention defines the term “refugee” as follow :

“As a result of events occurring before 1 January 1951 and owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion is out- side the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country ”[25]

Consequently, in order to be granted international protection, an asylum seeker needs to face persecution in his/her country of origin. However, women and men can face different forms of persecution. Different women asylum seekers are fleeing gender-based violence. Thus, the human rights law needed to evolve and recognize these specific violence, targeted against women, such as Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) or forced marriage, as persecution. It led the Council of Europe to adopt, on April 7th, 2011, the Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence, named also the Istanbul Convention. It recognizes gender-based violence as persecution, and so as grounds for refugee status. Article 60 paragraph 1 states that :

“Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that gender-based violence against women may be recognised as a form of persecution within the meaning of Article 1, A (2), of the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and as a form of serious harm giving rise to complementary/subsidiary protection.”[26]

However, these specific cases of persecution are not always well assessed when women arrive at asylum seekers facilities, leading to a lack of support and protection to these women and girls. Besides, the lack of female trained staff, capable of dealing with these specific experiences, can lead women and girls to not talk about their experience because of “cultural norms, language barriers or lack of information about their rights, trauma or shame”[27].

Nevertheless, some EU Member States have taken measures to ensure international protection to the survivors of gender-based violence. France is one of the countries that has tried to acknowledge and make easier the grant of refugee status on gender-based violence grounds. For example, “The French National Court of Asylum (CNDA) held that in countries where there is a high prevalence of female genital mutilation such as Nigeria, non-excised persons can be considered as having a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of membership of a particular social group”[28].

However, if some States have ratified the Istanbul Convention, others are not bound by it because they did not ratify it (Figure 2)[29].

Figure 2

Thus, ratifying the Convention would be a first step to protect migrant women from gender-based violence. Besides, further improvements need to be made from the EU as a whole, and not just some Member States, regarding the treatment of asylum seekers and refugees in facilities and the assessment of their claims.

Socio-economic integration

            Social integration

As refugees or migrants, women can face specific difficulties to integrate into the host country’s society. Indeed, in order to facilitate the integration, these women need networks. However, “women have far fewer networks than men”[30], and so it is more difficult for them to integrate into society. Besides, they can face discrimination that prevents them to integrate socially. It is one of the aspects of migration policy where an intersectional analysis is relevant. Indeed, race, religion or class of migrant women can lead to distrust among the host country’s population[31].  Moreover, a lot of women arrive in a country through family reunification[32]. Therefore, these women are dependent on the member of family that brought them (most of the time the husband or a man), and so sometimes, they do not have their own income, or they have to keep their role as the housekeeper. It prevents them to have proper host country’s language training, or the possibilities to have a job. According to Liebig and Tronstad, “Compared with refugee men, refugee women frequently receive less integration support, both in terms of hours of language training and active labour market measures”[33]. Coupled with the fact that a large proportion of refugee women has little or no “educational attainment”[34], the socio-economic integration of female migrants or refugees remains an issue for policy-makers in the field of migration.

Integration in the labor market

  • Factors preventing the employability of female migrants

This lack of integration in the society, the lack of language training or labor market measures add more difficulties for women immigrants or refugees to integrate in the labor market. Indeed, in general, migrants and refugees face a lot of obstacles to enter the labor market or benefit from the rights that are entitled to workers. Women immigrants or refugees face these obstacles, but as women, the difficulties to integrate economically are multiplying. Indeed, they hold the role of child bearer or housekeeper, and so they have more barriers and less time, or fewer opportunities to focus on integration measures.

For example, in Sweden, prior to the 2010 reform that introduced a new introduction programme to improve gender equality in the integration of both women and men refugees, it was noticed that women refugees “were offered fewer hours of language training, they participated in fewer follow-ups and got less labour market training compared to refugee men (Anderson et al. 2016, see also Swedish Integration Board, 2002). Poor health and childcare were the main reasons for women’s non-participation”[35]. It is why, in 2010, the Swedish government introduced a gender perspective in its migration policy and implemented a programme with diverse gender sensitive instruments to integrate women in the labor market,  such as an “individualised allowance for participation (…) (that) gave women their own income from participation in the programme”[36]. However, it was not enough, and it is why “For 2017-18, the Swedish Public Employment Service launched an Action Plan aimed at increasing the employment of refugee and other foreign-born women, including through more information and follow-up measures”[37]. It increased employment rates among female migrants and refugees. Besides, another proposal was, for women coming as an immigrant through family reunification, to provide “pre-integration measures”[38] during their waiting period abroad.

  • Discrimination that female migrants face in the workplace

Besides, when women immigrants or refugees manage to find a job, most of the time it is in “unregulated sectors”[39], such as “agriculture, domestic work, services, and the sex industry”[40]. In these sectors, there is a lack of labor standards, when they exist at all, and labor inspection is often inexistent. Therefore, according to Patrick Taran, female migrants face ““triple discrimination” — as women, as unprotected workers, and as migrants”[41].

The domestic work sector is an illustration of the discrimination migrant women can face in the labor market. Female migrants represent 73,4% of the migrant domestic workers (Figure 3)[42].

Figure 3

According to the FRA – European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights’ 2015 report on Severe labour exploitation: workers moving within or into the European Union, exploitation of domestic workers or the lack of labor standards is so common that it is often not considered as a breach of human rights. The report highlights that “Such workers are seen as voluntarily accepting – albeit because of their poverty and marginalisation – work under conditions that are exploitative”[43]. Hence, when undocumented, female migrants do not denounce the abuses they face because of the fear to be sent back to their country of origin. Even when they are documented, women do not report abuses because they need an income, and their precarious status makes it more difficult to find another job. Therefore, it is a vicious circle where the precarious status of these women reinforced their exploitation by employers.  For example, according to the FRA report’s case study, “In Ireland, a Nigerian girl worked for a family, taking care of the family’s child, and was prohibited from contacting her family or any other person. Her physical movements were restricted by her employer. When she complained, her employer threatened to have her returned to Nigeria”[44].

Including a gender perspective in migration policies to overcome these challenges would mean, according to the FRA, to :

  • Raise awareness and promote “a climate of zero tolerance of labor exploitation”[45]
  • Monitor and conduct more workplace inspections[46]
  • Give access to justice for the victims, by “encouraging victims to report”[47] through the “granting of residence permits”[48], for instance.

An illustration of these suggestions’ implementation can be found in Vienna, where UNDOK- Anlaufstelle zur gewerkschaftlichen Unterstützung Undokumentiert Arbeitender, a counselling center for undocumented workers, has been created in 2014. This center informs undocumented workers of their rights in Austria, provides legal assistance, and helps with labor and social law affairs[49].

  • The case of highly skilled female migrants

Highly skilled migrant women face also gender inequalities, since they often end up in jobs that require lower skills than they have. This phenomenon is called deskilling, when someone has a job that does not require the full extent of her/his capacities and skills. It is due to the migrant status that leads to a “lack of recognition of degrees obtained abroad, low value given to professional experience acquired before migration or lack of demand for their specific skills, or discrimination based on gender and ethnicity”[50].

A response to this deskilling phenomenon can be found in Germany with the PerMenti project. It “supports newly immigrated women, especially refugees with a higher education level or work experience, in planning their professional careers while they learn German and attend integration courses”[51]. Providing a specific assistance to the different kind of female migrants permits to have a better impact on their integration, and to be more efficient in improving their situation.

Gender mainstreaming in the European external response to immigration

We have seen that the European Union and its Member States try to integrate a gender perspective in their migration policies. However, in practice it needs to go further regarding the EU internal response to immigration, and especially it needs to be part of the broader European strategy on migration. Looking at the Commission’s communication on the New Pact on Migration and Asylum[52], gender issues seem to be not enough considered. This gender mainstreaming is possible and has particularly been implemented in the EU external response to immigration, through its development policies.

For example, aside from the DG for Justice and Consumers that coordinated all the DGs’ work for gender equality, the DG for Development and Cooperation (DEVCO) is the only DG with a unit specific for gender issues (the Gender Equality, Human Rights and Democratic Governance Unit)[53]. This focus on gender in development is seen, for example, in the EU Emergency Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF). It was implemented in 2015, just after the “new Action Plan for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment entitled Transforming the Lives of Girls and Women through EU External Relations for 2016-2020 (commonly referred to as GAP II) and the Strategic Engagement for Gender Equality”[54]. Several instruments to promote gender in the EUTF were implemented such as “gender analysis tailored to (the) country(‘s) context” or the use of sex-disaggregated data[55], showing the willingness of the EU to promote gender in its external response.

As Cascone and Knoll highlight, this example shows that the EU is more and more considering gender mainstreaming and acknowledging gender inequalities in its policies. Although in this project some gender inequalities still remain[56], it shows that some progress has been made and that these efforts need to be broadened and intensified.

Therefore, as we have seen throughout this article, one-size-fits-all policies are not efficient, especially in the migration field, because migrants are a highly diverse group. Taking a gender perspective on migration permits to acknowledge that men and women migrants do not face the same issues, and even female migrants are a diverse group. Thus, gender mainstreaming is needed in migration policies, because it provides a tailored response to the specific challenges these different groups face. By integrating this gender and intersectional analysis, policies are more efficient, and will have a stronger impact on the group targeted. However, if the EU has tried to integrate gender in its migration policies, efforts need to go further, and improvements need to be made.

Glossary

These definitions come from : European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

Gender :

“Gender refers to the social attributes and opportunities associated with being male and female and the relationships between women and men and girls and boys, as well as the relations between women and those between men. (…) Gender determines what is expected, allowed and valued in a woman or a man in a given context. In most societies there are differences and inequalities between women and men in responsibilities assigned, activities undertaken, access to and control over resources, as well as decision-making opportunities”

Gender equality :

“This refers to the equal rights, responsibilities and opportunities of women and men and girls and boys. Equality does not mean that women and men will become the same but that women’s and men’s rights, responsibilities and opportunities will not depend on whether they are born male or female”

Gender blindness:

“This term refers to the failure to recognize that the roles and responsibilities of men/boys and women/girls are assigned to them in specific social, cultural, economic, and political contexts and backgrounds. Projects, programs, policies and attitudes which are gender blind do not take into account these different roles and diverse needs. They maintain the status quo and will not help transform the unequal structure of gender relations.”

Gender perspective:

“An analysis from a gender perspective helps to see whether the needs of women and men are equally taken into account and served by [a] proposal. It enables policy-makers to develop policies with an understanding of the socio-economic reality of women and men and allows for policies to take (gender) differences into account”

Gender mainstreaming:

“The systematic consideration of the differences between the conditions, situations and needs of women and men in all Community policies and actions”

Intersectional gender approach :

“Social research method in which gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality and other social differences are simultaneously analysed”

Sex-disaggregated data :

“Sex-disaggregated statistics are data collected and tabulated separately for women and men. They allow for the measurement of differences between women and men on various social and economic dimensions and are one of the requirements in obtaining gender statistics”

Dual Approach to gender equality :

“Dual approach refers to complementarity between gender mainstreaming and specific gender equality policy and measures, including positive measures. It is also referred to as twin track strategy.”


[1] Guterres, António, « Secretary-General’s video message for the launch of the Report “From Promise to Action: The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration””, United-Nations Secretary General, New-York, 1 December 2020

[2] Foley, Laura & Piper, Nicolas, “COVID-19 and women migrant workers : Impacts and implications”, International Organization for Migration, August 2020, p.3

[3] European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[4]Sustainable Development Goals, “Take action for the Sustainable Development Goals”, United Nations, 2020

[5]United Nations Development Programme, “What are the Sustainable Development Goals”, UNDP, 2020

[6] European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[7]Deputy Director General, “A One-Size-Fits-All Approach to International Migration is Doomed to Fail”, International Organization for Migration, Geneva, 21 September 2012

[8] European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[9] Foran, Clara, “How to Design a City For Women”, Bloomberg CityLab, 16 September 2013

[10]European Commission, « EU Whoiswho », Publications Office of the European Union, 2020

[11]European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[12]European Commission, “COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS A Union of Equality: Gender Equality Strategy 2020-2025- COM/2020/152 final”, EUR-Lex, 5 March 2020

[13] Ibid

[14]European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[15]“ GBV is violence directed against a person because of that person’s gender or violence that affects persons of a particular gender disproportionately”, European Commission, “What is gender-based violence?”, European Commission website, 2020

[16]Free translation of the author, « Hala, une jeune femme de 23 ans originaire d’Alep, a déclaré à Amnesty International :« À l’hôtel en Turquie, un des hommes travaillant avec le passeur, un Syrien, m’a dit que si je couchais avec lui, je ne paierais pas ou que je paierais moins. Bien entendu, j’ai dit non, c’était dégoûtant. Nous avons toutes connu la même chose en Jordanie » », Amnesty International, « Les femmes réfugiées risquent agressions, exploitation et harcèlement sexuel lors de leur traversée de l’Europe », Amnesty International website, 18 January 2016

[17]General Secretariat of the Council of the European Union, “Beijing +25- The 5th Review of the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States draft report”, Council of the European Union, 4 October 2019, p.134 

[18]Hennebry, Jenna, Grass, Will, and McLaughlin, Janet, “Women migrant workers’ journey through the margins : labour, migration and trafficking”, UN Women, New York, November 2016, p.68

[19] United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, “Global Report on Trafficking in persons 2018”, United Nations, December 2018, p.26

[20]Council of Europe Gender Equality Strategy, “Protecting the rights of migrant, refugee and asylum-seeking women and girls”, Council of Europe, 2019, p. 9

[21]David, Fiona, Bryant, Katharine, and Joudo Larsen, Jacqueline, « Migrants and their vulnerability: to human trafficking, modern slavery and forced labour”, International Organization for Migration, 2019, p.37

[22]Free translation of the author, « Reem, 20 ans, qui voyageait avec son cousin âgé de 15 ans, a dit :« Je n’ai jamais dormi dans les camps. J’avais trop peur que quelqu’un me touche. Les tentes étaient toutes mixtes et j’ai été témoin de violences […] Je me sentais plus en sécurité lorsque j’étais en mouvement, en particulier dans un bus, le seul endroit où je pouvais fermer les yeux et dormir. Dans les camps, il y a tellement de risques de se faire toucher, et les femmes ne peuvent pas vraiment se plaindre et ne veulent pas causer de problèmes susceptibles de perturber leur voyage. » », Amnesty International, « Les femmes réfugiées risquent agressions, exploitation et harcèlement sexuel lors de leur traversée de l’Europe », Amnesty International website, 18 January 2016

[23]Council of Europe, “Report of the fact-finding mission by Ambassador Tomáš Boček,
Special Representative of the Secretary General on migration and refugees, to Bosnia and Herzegovina and to Croatia 24-27 July and 26-30 November 2018 – Information Documents SG/Inf(2019)10”, Council of Europe, 23 April 2019, p.15

[24] Directorate-General for Internal Policies, “Reception of female refugees and asylum seekers in the EU- Case study Belgium”, European Parliament, 2016, p.23

[25]United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, “Convention and Protocol Relating to The Status of Refugees”, UNHCR, consulted on December 5, 2020, p.14

[26]Council of Europe, “Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence- Istanbul, 11.V.2011”, Council of Europe website, consulted on December 5, 2020, p.17

[27]Ibid, p.5

[28] Hooper, Louise, “GENDER-BASED ASYLUM CLAIMS AND NON-REFOULEMENT: ARTICLES 60 AND 61 OF THE ISTANBUL CONVENTION – A collection of papers on the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence”, Council of Europe, December 2019, p.19

[29]Council of Europe, “Istanbul Convention- Action against violence against women and domestic violence- Text of the Convention”, Council of Europe website, 1st July 2019

[30]Liebig, Thomas, and Tronstad, Kristian Rose, “Triple Disadvantage ? A first overview of the integration of refugee women”, OECD, 2018, p.10

[31]Tabaud, Anne-Lise, « Explaining the main drivers of anti-immigration attitudes in Europe”, EU-Logos Athena, 4 November 2020

[32]“While 60% of refugee men entered through the asylum channel, only 38% of refugee women entered through this channel”, Liebig, Thomas, and Tronstad, Kristian Rose, “Triple Disadvantage ? A first overview of the integration of refugee women”, OECD, 2018, p.14

[33]Ibid, p. 10

[34]Ibid, p. 25

[35]Ibid, p. 31

[36] Ibid

[37] Ibid

[38]Ibid, p.32

[39]Taran, Patrick, « Migrant Women, Women Migrant Workers – Crucial challenges for Rights-based Action and Advocacy”, OHCHR, 21 July 2016, p.1

[40]Ibid

[41]Ibid, p.2

[42]Galloti, Maria, « Migrant Domestic Workers Across the World: global and regional estimates”, International Labour Organization, 2016, p.2 

[43]European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, “Severe labour exploitation: workers moving within or into the European Union”, FRA – European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, 2015, p.15

[44]Ibid, p.53

[45]Ibid, p.15

[46] Ibid, p.17

[47]Ibid, p.19

[48]Ibid

[49]Ibid, p.56

[50] International Organization for Migration, « Crushed hopes : underemployement and deskilling among skilled migrant women”, IOM, 2012, p. 23

[51]Li, Monica, “Integration of migrant women: a key challenge with limited policy resources”, European Commission, 12 November 2018

[52] European Commission, “COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS on a New Pact on Migration and Asylum COM (2020) 609 final”, European Commission, 23 September 2020

[53]European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[54]These two documents represent the framework to promote gender equality in the EU external action.

Cascone, Noemi, and Knoll, Anna, “Promoting Gender in the EU external response to migration: the case of the Trust Fund for Africa”, The European Center for development Policy Management, October 2018, p. 8

[55]Ibid, p.13

[56] Ibid, p.17


La dimension de genre dans les politiques européennes migratoires

Le 1er décembre 2020, à l’occasion du lancement du rapport From Promise to Action : The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, António Guterres, Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies, a déclaré que « nombre de ceux qui fournissent des services de santé et de soins essentiels sont des femmes migrantes. Elles ne doivent plus être invisibles »[1]. En effet, la crise COVID a révélé que les migrants, et en particulier les femmes migrantes, font partie des travailleurs essentiels[2]. Cependant, elles sont souvent laissées pour compte par les politiques migratoires indifférentes à l’égard du genre. Il est donc important de tenir compte de la dimension de genre dans les politiques migratoires car « cela permet aux décideurs politiques d’élaborer des politiques en tenant compte de la réalité socio-économique des femmes et des hommes et de prendre en considération les différences (de genre) »[3]. Par conséquent, à travers le gender mainstreaming, il s’agit de réaliser l’égalité des genres, qui est le cinquième des objectifs de développement durable[4] adoptés par les États membres des Nations Unies, y compris l’Union européenne, en 2015[5]. Comme le souligne l’Institut européen pour l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes :

« L’égalité des genres implique que les intérêts, les besoins et les priorités des femmes et des hommes soient pris en considération, en reconnaissant la diversité des différents groupes de femmes et d’hommes. L’égalité des genres n’est pas une question de femmes mais doit concerner et engager pleinement les hommes comme les femmes. L’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes est considérée à la fois comme une question de droits humains et comme une condition préalable et un indicateur d’un développement durable centré sur les personnes »[6].

Ainsi, l’égalité des genres en tant que norme de développement durable est reconnue, mais n’est pas toujours appliquée dans les politiques européennes, et notamment celles relatives aux migrations. Ces politiques publiques sont souvent des approches uniformes[7], qui ne tiennent pas compte du fait que les groupes de migrants sont très divers, surtout lorsque qu’il s’agit des hommes et des femmes. En effet, les hommes et les femmes ne vont pas rencontrer les mêmes difficultés sur les routes migratoires, ni en matière d’intégration. Par conséquent, les politiques migratoires n’auront pas les mêmes effets sur ces différents groupes, dans ce cas sur les hommes ou les femmes.

C’est pourquoi, dans cet article, nous allons essayer de démontrer que l’adoption d’une dimension de genre dans le domaine de l’élaboration des politiques publiques, en particulier dans les politiques migratoires européennes, conduit à des politiques plus efficaces, plus sensibles aux questions de genre, et contribue à la réalisation de l’égalité entre les genres.

Le gender mainstreaming dans l’Union européenne

Qu’est-ce que le gender mainstreaming ?

Le gender mainstreaming, ou approche intégrée de la dimension de genre, « implique l’intégration d’une dimension de genre dans la préparation, la conception, la mise en œuvre, le suivi et l’évaluation des politiques, des mesures réglementaires et des programmes de dépenses »[8]. Il ne s’agit pas tant d’un objectif que d’une méthode pour atteindre l’objectif, qui est l’égalité des genres. Il s’agit de modifier les procédures, afin de moderniser le processus d’élaboration des politiques publiques. Le gender mainstreaming permet de réfléchir à des politiques qui prendront en compte les besoins différents des hommes et des femmes. Un exemple d’intégration de la dimension de genre dans les politiques urbaines est de mettre en place « un éclairage supplémentaire (…) pour rendre les trajets de nuit à pieds plus sûrs pour les femmes »[9].

Cette nouvelle façon de penser le processus d’élaboration des politiques publiques est apparue lorsque les décideurs politiques ont réalisé que le fait de prendre en compte le genre comme une question distincte ne fonctionne pas, puisque les inégalités entre les genres sont présentes dans différents domaines, comme le marché du travail, la migration, la politique, ou même l’urbanisme. D’où la nécessité d’adopter une perspective de genre lors de l’élaboration des politiques publiques.

Le gender mainstreaming dans l’Union européenne

Dans l’Union européenne, l’intégration de la dimension de genre est prise en compte à la fois par la Commission européenne et par le Parlement européen.

À la Commission européenne, la direction générale de la justice et des consommateurs est chargée de mettre en œuvre le gender mainstreaming dans toutes les directions générales de la Commission. Son unité Égalité des genres (unité D.2), dirigée par Irena Moozova[10], l’actuelle directrice à l’égalité et à la citoyenneté de l’Union, est chargée d’aider les autres DG à inclure une dimension de genre dans leurs activités, et supervise « l’Inter-Service Group on Gender Equality (ISG) »[11]. Ce groupe compte des membres de toutes les DG et de tous les services de la Commission et « coordonne la mise en œuvre des actions pour l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes dans les politiques et les programmes de travail annuels de leurs domaines d’action respectifs »[12].

En outre, le 5 mars 2020, la Commission a publié sa Stratégie en faveur de l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes 2020-2025, renforçant la volonté de la Commission d’intégrer l’égalité des genres dans son travail. Comme elle l’indique, « La mise en œuvre de cette stratégie reposera sur une approche double, consistant en des mesures ciblées tendant à l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes combinées à une intégration renforcée de la dimension hommes-femmes dans toutes les politiques »[13]. Elle inclut également dans sa stratégie une approche intersectionnelle de l’égalité des genres, car « Les femmes constituent un groupe hétérogène et peuvent être confrontées à des discriminations intersectionnelles fondées sur plusieurs caractéristiques personnelles »[14].

Quant au Parlement européen, la commission des droits de la femme et de l’égalité des genres (FEMM) est l’une de ses commissions parlementaires. Selon l’Institut européen pour l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes, « la FEMM joue un rôle crucial pour faire progresser l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes dans l’UE en légiférant et en influençant l’agenda politique européen dans le domaine de l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes et des droits de la femme »[15].

Les institutions européennes ont reconnu la nécessité de l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes. Par conséquent, elles s’efforcent d’intégrer la dimension de genre dans toutes les politiques publiques. Cependant, dans le domaine de la migration, des inégalités entre les genres subsistent encore.

Les inégalités de genre dans le domaine de la migration : comment les surmonter ?

Les femmes migrantes, qu’elles soient immigrantes, demandeuses d’asile ou réfugiées, sont confrontées à des inégalités aux différentes étapes de leur parcours. Nous exposerons trois domaines différents dans lesquels les femmes migrantes sont confrontées à ces inégalités de genre : sur les routes migratoires et dans les centres d’accueil, d’hébergement et de détention, en matière de protection internationale, et en matière d’intégration socio-économique dans le pays d’accueil. 

Les routes migratoires et les lieux d’accueil, d’hébergement et de détention

Violences basées sur le genre et la traite d’êtres humains sur les routes migratoires

Les femmes et les filles migrantes, qu’elles soient demandeuses d’asile ou migrantes économiques, sont confrontées à des inégalités de genre sur les routes migratoires. Au cours de leur voyage, elles doivent surmonter de nombreux dangers liés aux violences basées sur le genre[16]. Du harcèlement sexuel et viol, à la traite d’êtres humains, elles vivent dans une insécurité constante. Par exemple, « Hala, une jeune femme de 23 ans originaire d’Alep, a déclaré à Amnesty International :« À l’hôtel en Turquie, un des hommes travaillant avec le passeur, un Syrien, m’a dit que si je couchais avec lui, je ne paierais pas ou que je paierais moins. Bien entendu, j’ai dit non, c’était dégoûtant. Nous avons toutes connu la même chose en Jordanie » »[17]. De plus, selon le rapport The 5th Review of the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States, «En Irlande, une étude sur les jeunes filles migrantes non-accompagnées a révélé que 60 % d’entre elles étaient victimes de violences sexuelles ou d’autres formes de violence »[18].

En ce qui concerne la traite d’êtres humains, les migrants, hommes et femmes, sont particulièrement vulnérables à la « traite, au travail forcé ou à une exploitation grave, telle que (…) l’esclavage sexuel »[19]. Toutefois, les femmes et les filles restent les plus vulnérables en matière de traite (Image 1)[20], en particulier lorsqu’il s’agit de femmes et de filles migrantes. Par exemple, « en 2017, l’Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations (OIM) a signalé que l’Italie avait connu une augmentation de près de 600 % depuis 2014 du nombre de victimes potentielles du trafic à des fins d’exploitation sexuelle arrivant par la route de la Méditerranée centrale, principalement des filles nigérianes âgées de 15 à 17 ans »[21].

Image 1

Adopter une perspective de genre sur la traite d’êtres humains permet de comprendre que les hommes et les femmes, et en particulier les migrants, sont touchés de différentes manières. Selon David et al, « Alors que les femmes sont victimes de manière disproportionnée du travail forcé dans l’économie privée (y compris dans le travail domestique et l’exploitation sexuelle commerciale) et du mariage forcé, les hommes sont soumis de manière disproportionnée à des formes de travail forcé imposées par l’État, (…) ainsi qu’au travail forcé dans les secteurs de la construction, de l’industrie manufacturière et de l’agriculture »[22].  C’est pourquoi, le gender mainstreaming est important, afin de répondre de manière appropriée aux différentes vulnérabilités des hommes et des femmes migrants.

L’insécurité et les centres d’accueil, d’hébergement et de détention non adaptés aux inégalités de genre  

Les femmes et les filles migrantes, lorsqu’elles ont réussi à surmonter les obstacles des routes migratoires, et ont atteint l’Europe, sont toujours confrontées aux inégalités de genre, à la violence basée sur le genre ou à l’insécurité. En effet, beaucoup d’infrastructures destinées à l’hébergement, l’accueil et la détention de migrants sont inadaptées et reproduisent les inégalités de genre. De nombreux centres d’accueil ne disposent pas de zones séparées pour les hommes et les femmes, ce qui entraîne un sentiment d’insécurité chez ces dernières. Par exemple, « Reem, 20 ans, qui voyageait avec son cousin âgé de 15 ans, a dit :« Je n’ai jamais dormi dans les camps. J’avais trop peur que quelqu’un me touche. Les tentes étaient toutes mixtes et j’ai été témoin de violences […] Je me sentais plus en sécurité lorsque j’étais en mouvement, en particulier dans un bus, le seul endroit où je pouvais fermer les yeux et dormir. Dans les camps, il y a tellement de risques de se faire toucher, et les femmes ne peuvent pas vraiment se plaindre et ne veulent pas causer de problèmes susceptibles de perturber leur voyage. » »[23].

De plus, beaucoup de femmes migrantes, en raison de leur culture ou de leur mari, ne se sentent pas à l’aise d’être traitées par des médecins masculins, ou d’être prises en charge par un personnel masculin. Par exemple, sur le site Borići en Bosnie-Herzégovine, « il n’était pas rare qu’elles (les femmes migrantes) ou leurs maris refusent les consultations médicales par des médecins masculins, notamment des gynécologues. En l’absence de spécialistes féminins, l’accès aux soins de santé pour les femmes réfugiées et migrantes reste difficile »[24].

Que peut-on mettre en œuvre pour traiter ces problèmes spécifiques auxquels les femmes et les jeunes filles sont confrontées en tant que migrantes ?

Le cas des centres d’accueil belges donne un exemple de la manière dont le gender mainstreaming peut être appliqué dans la politique migratoire. Pour répondre aux inégalités entre les genres et offrir des conditions d’accueil tenant compte des spécificités de chaque groupe, la Belgique dispose de « 70 places dans 21 appartements pour femmes seules avec enfants et 40 places dans un centre spécialisé pour les jeunes filles enceintes et les jeunes mères non accompagnées »[25]. Cela permet de fournir à ces femmes et à ces jeunes filles l’assistance dont elles ont besoin dans des conditions sûres, ainsi que des traitements conçus pour répondre à leurs besoins spécifiques.

Protection internationale

L’article 1, paragraphe 2, de la Convention de 1951 relative au statut des réfugiés définit le terme « réfugié » comme suit :

« (…) toute personne : (2) Qui, par suite d’événements survenus avant le 1er janvier 1951 et craignant avec raison d’être persécutée du fait de sa race, de sa religion, de sa nationalité, de son appartenance à un certain groupe social ou de ses opinions politiques, se trouve hors du pays dont elle a la nationalité et qui ne peut ou, du fait de cette crainte, ne veut se réclamer de la protection de ce pays »[26]

Ainsi, pour obtenir une protection internationale, un demandeur d’asile doit faire face à des persécutions dans son pays d’origine. Cependant, les femmes et les hommes peuvent être confrontés à différentes formes de persécution. Les femmes qui demandent l’asile fuient dans certains cas les violences basées sur le genre. Ainsi, le droit international devait évoluer et reconnaître ces violences spécifiques, ciblées sur les femmes, telles que les mutilations génitales féminines (MGF) ou le mariage forcé, comme une persécution. Cela a conduit le Conseil de l’Europe à adopter, le 7 avril 2011, la Convention sur la prévention et la lutte contre la violence à l’égard des femmes et la violence domestique, également appelée Convention d’Istanbul. Elle reconnaît la violence basée sur le genre comme une persécution, et donc comme un motif pour obtenir le statut de réfugié. L’article 60, paragraphe 1, stipule que :

« Les Parties prennent les mesures législatives ou autres nécessaires pour que la violence à l’égard des femmes fondée sur le genre puisse être reconnue comme une forme de persécution au sens de l’article 1, A (2), de la Convention relative au statut des réfugiés de 1951 et comme une forme de préjudice grave donnant lieu à une protection complémentaire/subsidiaire »[27]

Cependant, ces cas spécifiques de persécution ne sont pas toujours bien évalués lorsque les femmes arrivent dans les centres pour demandeurs d’asile, ce qui entraîne un manque de soutien et de protection pour ces femmes et ces jeunes filles. En outre, le manque de personnel féminin qualifié, capable de traiter ces expériences particulières, peut conduire les femmes et les jeunes filles à ne pas parler de leur expérience en raison de « normes culturelles, de barrières linguistiques ou d’un manque d’information sur leurs droits, d’un traumatisme ou de la honte »[28].

Néanmoins, certains États membres de l’UE ont pris des mesures pour assurer une protection internationale aux survivantes de violences basées sur le genre. La France est l’un des pays qui a tenté de reconnaître et de faciliter l’octroi du statut de réfugié pour ces raisons. Par exemple, « La Cour nationale du droit d’asile française (CNDA) a estimé que dans les pays où la prévalence des mutilations génitales féminines est élevée, comme au Nigeria, les personnes non excisées peuvent être considérées comme ayant une crainte fondée de persécution en raison de leur appartenance à un groupe social particulier »[29].

Toutefois, si certains États ont ratifié la Convention d’Istanbul, d’autres ne sont pas liés par celle-ci parce qu’ils ne l’ont pas ratifiée (Image 2)[30].

Image 2

Ainsi, la ratification de la Convention serait un premier pas pour protéger les femmes migrantes contre la violence basée sur le genre. En outre, des améliorations supplémentaires doivent être apportées à la stratégie de gestion des migrations de l’UE dans son ensemble, et pas seulement aux politiques migratoires des États membres, en ce qui concerne le traitement des demandeurs d’asile et des réfugiés dans les établissements, et l’évaluation de leurs demandes.

Intégration socio-économique

            Intégration sociale

En tant que réfugiées ou migrantes, les femmes peuvent être confrontées à des difficultés spécifiques pour s’intégrer dans la société du pays d’accueil. En effet, afin de faciliter l’intégration, ces femmes ont besoin de réseaux. Cependant, « les femmes ont beaucoup moins de réseaux que les hommes »[31] lorsqu’elles arrivent, et il leur est donc plus difficile de s’intégrer dans la société. En outre, elles peuvent être confrontées à des discriminations qui les empêchent de s’intégrer socialement. C’est l’un des aspects des politiques migratoires pour lequel une analyse intersectionnelle est pertinente. En effet, la race, la religion ou la classe des femmes migrantes peuvent susciter la méfiance de la population du pays d’accueil[32].  En outre, beaucoup de femmes arrivent dans un pays par le biais du regroupement familial[33]. Ces femmes sont donc dépendantes du membre de la famille qui les a fait venir (la plupart du temps le mari ou un homme), et il arrive donc qu’elles n’aient pas de revenus propres, ou qu’elles doivent conserver leur rôle de femme au foyer. Cela les empêche d’avoir une formation linguistique, ou la possibilité d’avoir un emploi. Selon Liebig et Tronstad, « par rapport aux hommes réfugiés, les femmes réfugiées reçoivent souvent moins de soutien à l’intégration, tant en termes d’heures de formation linguistique que de mesures actives pour l’entrée sur le marché du travail »[34]. Conjuguée au fait qu’une grande partie des femmes réfugiées n’ont pas ou peu eu la chance d’aller à l’école[35], l’intégration socio-économique des femmes migrantes ou réfugiées reste un problème pour les décideurs politiques dans le domaine de la migration.

Intégration sur le marché du travail

  • Facteurs empêchant l’employabilité des femmes migrantes

Ce manque d’intégration dans la société, l’absence de formation linguistique ou de mesures relatives à l’intégration dans le marché du travail ajoutent aux difficultés d’insertion des femmes immigrées ou réfugiées sur le marché du travail. En effet, en général, les migrants et les réfugiés sont confrontés à de nombreux obstacles pour trouver un emploi ou bénéficier des droits relatifs aux travailleurs. Les femmes immigrées ou réfugiées sont confrontées à ces obstacles, mais en tant que femmes, les difficultés d’intégration économique se multiplient. En effet, elles tiennent le rôle de porteuse d’enfants ou de femme au foyer. Elles ont donc moins de temps, ou moins de possibilités de se concentrer sur les mesures d’intégration.

Par exemple, en Suède, avant la réforme de 2010 qui a introduit un nouveau programme d’intégration visant à améliorer l’égalité des genres dans l’intégration des réfugiés, hommes et femmes, on a remarqué que les femmes réfugiées « se voyaient offrir moins d’heures de formation linguistique, participaient à moins de suivis et recevaient moins de formation sur le marché du travail que les hommes réfugiés (Anderson et al. 2016, voir aussi Conseil suédois de l’intégration, 2002). La mauvaise santé et la garde des enfants étaient les principales raisons de la non-participation des femmes »[36] . C’est pourquoi, en 2010, le gouvernement suédois a introduit une dimension de genre dans sa politique migratoire  et a mis en œuvre un programme avec divers instruments sensibles au genre pour intégrer les femmes sur le marché du travail, tels qu’une « allocation individualisée pour la participation (…) (qui) donnait aux femmes leur propre revenu provenant de la participation au programme »[37]. Toutefois, cela n’a pas suffi, et c’est pourquoi « pour 2017-18, le service public suédois de l’emploi a lancé un plan d’action visant à accroître l’emploi des femmes réfugiées et d’autres femmes nées à l’étranger, notamment par le biais de plus d’informations et de mesures de suivi »[38]. Ce plan a permis d’augmenter le taux d’emploi des femmes migrantes et réfugiées. De plus, une autre proposition consistait, pour les femmes arrivant comme immigrantes dans le cadre du regroupement familial, à prévoir des « mesures de pré-intégration »[39] pendant leur période d’attente à l’étranger.

  • Les discriminations dont sont victimes les femmes migrantes sur le lieu de travail

Lorsque les femmes immigrées ou réfugiées parviennent à trouver un emploi, c’est le plus souvent dans des « secteurs non réglementés »[40], tels que « l’agriculture, le travail domestique, les services et l’industrie du sexe »[41]. Dans ces secteurs, il y a un manque de normes de travail, quand elles existent, et l’inspection du travail est souvent inexistante. Par conséquent, selon Patrick Taran, les femmes migrantes sont confrontées à une « triple discrimination – en tant que femmes, en tant que travailleuses non protégées et en tant que migrantes »[42].

Le secteur du travail domestique est une illustration des discriminations auxquelles les femmes migrantes peuvent être confrontées sur le marché du travail. Elles représentent 73,4 % des travailleurs domestiques migrants (Image 3)[43].

Image 3

Selon le rapport de 2015 de la FRA – Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne nommé Severe labour exploitation: workers moving within or into the European Union, l’exploitation des travailleurs domestiques ou l’absence de normes de travail est si courante qu’elle n’est souvent pas considérée comme une violation des droits de l’homme. Le rapport souligne que « ces travailleurs sont considérés comme acceptant volontairement – bien qu’en raison de leur pauvreté et de leur marginalisation – de travailler dans des conditions d’exploitation »[44] . Ainsi, lorsqu’elles sont sans papiers, les femmes migrantes ne dénoncent pas les abus auxquels elles sont confrontées par crainte d’être renvoyées dans leur pays d’origine. Même lorsqu’elles ont des papiers, ces femmes ne dénoncent pas les abus car elles ont besoin d’un revenu, et leur statut précaire rend plus difficile la recherche d’un autre emploi. Il s’agit donc d’un cercle vicieux où le statut précaire de ces femmes a renforcé leur exploitation par les employeurs.  Par exemple, selon l’étude de cas du rapport de la FRA, « En Irlande, une jeune Nigériane travaillait pour une famille, s’occupant de l’enfant de la famille, et il lui était interdit de contacter sa famille ou toute autre personne. Ses mouvements physiques étaient limités par son employeur. Lorsqu’elle s’est plainte, son employeur a menacé de la renvoyer au Nigeria »[45].

Selon la FRA, l’intégration d’une dimension de genre dans les politiques migratoires liées à l’intégration signifierait de :

– Sensibiliser et promouvoir « un climat de tolérance zéro de l’exploitation au travail »[46].

– Surveiller et effectuer davantage d’inspections sur le lieu de travail[47] 

– Donner accès à la justice aux victimes, en « encourageant les victimes à porter plainte »[48], par exemple par l' »octroi de permis de séjour »[49].

Une illustration de la mise en œuvre de ces suggestions se trouve à Vienne, où l’UNDOK- Anlaufstelle zur gewerkschaftlichen Unterstützung Undokumentiert Arbeitender, un centre de conseil pour les travailleurs sans papiers, a été créé en 2014. Ce centre informe les travailleurs sans papiers de leurs droits en Autriche, leur fournit une assistance juridique et les aide dans leurs démarches en matière de droit du travail et de droit social[50].

  • Le cas des femmes migrantes hautement qualifiées

Les femmes migrantes hautement qualifiées sont également confrontées à des inégalités entre les sexes, car elles se retrouvent souvent dans des emplois qui exigent moins de compétences qu’elles n’en ont. Ce phénomène est appelé déqualification, lorsqu’une personne occupe un emploi qui n’exige pas toute l’étendue de ses capacités et de ses compétences. Il est dû au statut de migrant qui entraîne « une absence de reconnaissance des diplômes obtenus à l’étranger, une faible valorisation de l’expérience professionnelle acquise avant la migration ou une absence de demande pour leurs compétences spécifiques, ou encore une discrimination fondée sur le sexe et l’origine ethnique »[51].

Une réponse à ce phénomène de déqualification peut être trouvée en Allemagne avec le projet PerMenti. Ce projet « aide les femmes nouvellement immigrées, en particulier les réfugiées ayant un niveau d’études supérieures ou une expérience professionnelle, à planifier leur carrière professionnelle tout en apprenant l’allemand et en suivant des cours d’intégration »[52]. Fournir une assistance spécifique aux différents types de groupes de femmes migrantes, permet aux mesures prises d’avoir un meilleur impact sur leur intégration et d’améliorer plus efficacement leur situation.

Le gender mainstreaming dans la réponse extérieure de l’Union européenne à l’immigration

Nous avons vu que l’Union européenne et ses États membres tentent d’intégrer une perspective de genre dans leurs politiques migratoires. Cependant, dans la pratique, l’UE doit aller plus loin en ce qui concerne sa réponse interne à l’immigration. Par ailleurs, ce gender mainstreaming doit s’inscrire dans la stratégie européenne globale en matière de migration. Si l’on regarde la communication de la Commission européenne relative au nouveau pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile[53], les questions de genre semblent ne pas être suffisamment prises en compte. Cette intégration de la dimension de genre est possible et a été particulièrement mise en œuvre dans la réponse externe de l’UE à l’immigration, par le biais de ses politiques de développement.

Par exemple, mis à part la DG Justice et Consommateurs, qui a coordonné les travaux des autres DG en matière d’égalité de genre, la DG Développement et Coopération (DEVCO) est la seule à disposer d’une unité spécifique pour les questions de genre (l’unité Égalité des sexes, droits de l’homme et gouvernance démocratique)[54]. L’accent mis sur le genre dans le développement se retrouve, par exemple, dans le Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’Union européenne pour l’Afrique (EUTF). Il a été mis en œuvre en 2015, dans un contexte d’engagement pour l’égalité des genres au sein de l’UE[55]. Plusieurs instruments visant à promouvoir l’égalité des genres dans le cadre du Fonds fiduciaire ont été mis en œuvre, tels que « un analyse intégrant le genre adaptée au contexte (des) pays »[56] ou l’utilisation de données ventilées par sexe, ce qui montre la volonté de l’UE de promouvoir l’égalité des genres dans sa réponse extérieure.

Comme le soulignent Cascone et Knoll, cet exemple montre que l’UE envisage de plus en plus l’intégration de la dimension de genre et reconnaît les inégalités entre les genres dans ses politiques. Bien que certaines inégalités entre les genres subsistent dans les projets de ce fond fiduciaire[57], il montre que des progrès ont été réalisés et que ces efforts doivent être élargis et intensifiés.

Par conséquent, comme nous l’avons vu tout au long de cet article, les politiques publiques uniformes ne sont pas efficaces, en particulier dans le domaine de la migration, car les migrants constituent un groupe très diversifié. Adopter une perspective de genre dans le domaine des politiques migratoires permet de reconnaître que les migrants, hommes et femmes, ne sont pas confrontés aux mêmes problèmes, et que même les femmes migrantes constituent un groupe diversifié. Le gender mainstreaming est donc nécessaire dans les politiques migratoires, car il apporte une réponse adaptée aux défis spécifiques auxquels ces différents groupes sont confrontés. En intégrant cette analyse sexospécifique et intersectionnelle, les politiques sont plus efficaces et auront un impact plus fort sur le groupe visé. Toutefois, si l’UE a tenté d’intégrer la dimension de genre dans ses politiques migratoires, les efforts doivent être approfondis et des améliorations doivent être apportées.


Glossaire

Genre : 

« Le genre fait référence aux attributs sociaux et aux opportunités associés au fait d’être un homme et une femme et aux relations entre les femmes et les hommes et les filles et les garçons, ainsi qu’aux relations entre les femmes et celles entre les hommes. (…) Le genre détermine ce qui est attendu, autorisé et valorisé chez une femme ou un homme dans un contexte donné. Dans la plupart des sociétés, il existe des différences et des inégalités entre les femmes et les hommes en ce qui concerne les responsabilités attribuées, les activités entreprises, l’accès aux ressources et leur contrôle, ainsi que les possibilités de prise de décision »

Source : Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

Égalité des genres (ou égalité entre les hommes et les femmes) : 

« Ce terme désigne l’égalité des droits, des responsabilités et des chances des femmes et des hommes, des filles et des garçons. Égalité ne veut pas dire que les femmes et les hommes doivent devenir les mêmes, mais que leurs droits, responsabilités et opportunités ne dépendront pas du fait qu’ils sont né.e.s hommes ou femmes. » 

Source : CARE, « Glossaire illustré des termes liés au genre : Dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre des programmes et projets CARE », CARE France, 2018, p.15

Indifférence à l’égard du genre :

« Ce terme désigne l’incapacité à reconnaître que les rôles et responsabilités des hommes et garçons et des femmes et filles leur sont attribués dans des contextes et cadres sociaux, culturels, économiques et politiques spécifiques. Les projets, programmes, politiques et attitudes insensibles au genre ne prennent pas en compte ces rôles différents et ces besoins divers. Ils perpétuent le statu quo et ne contribueront pas à transformer la structure inégale des relations entre les genres » 

Source : CARE, « Glossaire illustré des termes liés au genre : Dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre des programmes et projets CARE », CARE France, 2018, p.22

La dimension de genre ou la perspective de l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes :

« Une analyse selon une dimension de genre aide à voir si les besoins des femmes et des hommes sont également pris en compte et servis par [une] politique publique. Elle permet aux décideurs politiques d’élaborer des politiques en tenant compte de la réalité socio-économique des femmes et des hommes et permet aux politiques de prendre en considération les différences (entre les genres) »

Source : Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

Gender Maintreaming ou approche intégrée de la dimension de genre ou approche intégrée de l’égalité :

« L’approche intégrée consiste en la (ré)organisation, l’amélioration, l’évolution et l’évaluation des processus de prise de décision, aux fins d’incorporer la perspective de l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes dans tous les domaines et à tous les niveaux, par les acteurs généralement impliqués dans la mise en place des politiques »

Source : Division Égalité entre les femmes et les hommes – Direction générale des droits de l’homme, « L’approche intégrée de l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes – Cadre conceptuel, méthodologie et présentation des «bonnes pratiques» : Rapport final d’activités du Groupe de spécialistes pour une approche intégrée de l’égalité », Conseil de l’Europe, 2004, p.13

Approche intersectionnelle : 

« Méthode de recherche sociale dans laquelle le genre, l’ethnicité, la classe, la sexualité et d’autres différences sociales sont analysés simultanément »

Source : Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

Données ventilées par sexe :

« Ce sont des données croisées et classées par sexe, fournissant des renseignements séparés pour les hommes et les femmes, les garçons et les filles. (…) Lorsque les données ne sont pas ventilées par sexe, il est plus difficile de déceler les inégalités réelles et potentielles »

Source : CARE, « Glossaire illustré des termes liés au genre : Dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre des programmes et projets CARE », CARE France, 2018, p.14

Double approche de l’égalité des genres :

« La double approche se réfère à la complémentarité entre l’intégration de la dimension de genre et les politiques et mesures spécifiques d’égalité entre les genres, y compris la discrimination positive »

Source : Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

Discrimination positive :

« Ce terme désigne les actions visant à accélérer l’égalité de fait entre hommes et femmes susceptibles, à court terme, de favoriser les femmes (…). Les Nations Unies précisent que « l’adoption par les États parties de mesures temporaires spéciales visant à accélérer l’instauration d’une égalité de fait entre les hommes et les femmes n’est pas considérée comme un acte de discrimination tel qu’il est défini dans la présente Convention, mais ne doit en aucune façon avoir pour conséquence le maintien de normes inégales ou distinctes ; ces mesures doivent être abrogées dès que les objectifs en matière d’égalité des chances et de traitement ont été atteints » (CEDAW, article 4, paragraphe 1)» 

Source : CARE, « Glossaire illustré des termes liés au genre : Dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre des programmes et projets CARE », CARE France, 2018, p.11-12


[1] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Guterres, António, « Secretary-General’s video message for the launch of the Report “From Promise to Action: The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration””, United-Nations Secretary General, New-York, 1 December 2020

[2] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Foley, Laura & Piper, Nicolas, “COVID-19 and women migrant workers : Impacts and implications”, International Organization for Migration, August 2020, p.3

[3]Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[4] Sustainable Development Goals, “Take action for the Sustainable Development Goals”, United Nations, 2020

[5] United Nations Development Programme, “What are the Sustainable Development Goals”, UNDP, 2020

[6]Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “Concepts and Definitions”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[7]Deputy Director General, “A One-Size-Fits-All Approach to International Migration is Doomed to Fail”, International Organization for Migration, Geneva, 21 September 2012

[8]Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[9]Traduction libre de l’auteur, Foran, Clara, “How to Design a City For Women”, Bloomberg CityLab, 16 September 2013

[10] European Commission, « EU Whoiswho », Publications Office of the European Union, 2020

[11]European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[12]Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[13] Commission européenne, « COMMUNICATION DE LA COMMISSION AU PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN, AU CONSEIL, AU COMITÉ ÉCONOMIQUE ET SOCIAL EUROPÉEN ET AU COMITÉ DES RÉGIONS Une Union pour l’égalité : Stratégie en faveur de l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes 2020-2025- COM/2020/152 final », EUR-Lex, 5 mars 2020

[14] Ibid

[15] Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[16] « La violence basée sur le genre ou sexospécifique est la violence dirigée spécifiquement contre un homme ou une femme du fait de son sexe ou qui affecte les femmes ou les hommes de façon disproportionnée », MONUSCO, « Genre et violence », Nations Unies, 2020

[17] Amnesty International, « Les femmes réfugiées risquent agressions, exploitation et harcèlement sexuel lors de leur traversée de l’Europe », Amnesty International website, 18 January 2016

[18] Traduction libre de l’auteur, General Secretariat of the Council of the European Union, “Beijing +25- The 5th Review of the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States draft report”, Council of the European Union, 4 October 2019, p.134 

[19] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Hennebry, Jenna, Grass, Will, and McLaughlin, Janet, “Women migrant workers’ journey through the margins : labour, migration and trafficking”, UN Women, New York, November 2016, p.68

[20] United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, “Global Report on Trafficking in persons 2018”, United Nations, December 2018, p.26

[21] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Council of Europe Gender Equality Strategy, “Protecting the rights of migrant, refugee and asylum-seeking women and girls”, Council of Europe, 2019, p. 9

[22] Traduction libre de l’auteur, David, Fiona, Bryant, Katharine, and Joudo Larsen, Jacqueline, « Migrants and their vulnerability: to human trafficking, modern slavery and forced labour”, International Organization for Migration, 2019, p.37

[23] Amnesty International, « Les femmes réfugiées risquent agressions, exploitation et harcèlement sexuel lors de leur traversée de l’Europe », Amnesty International website, 18 January 2016

[24] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Council of Europe, “Report of the fact-finding mission by Ambassador Tomáš Boček, Special Representative of the Secretary General on migration and refugees, to Bosnia and Herzegovina and to Croatia 24-27 July and 26-30 November 2018 – Information Documents SG/Inf(2019)10”, Council of Europe, 23 April 2019, p.15

[25]Traduction libre de l’auteur, Directorate-General for Internal Policies, “Reception of female refugees and asylum seekers in the EU- Case study Belgium”, European Parliament, 2016, p.23

[26] Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, “Convention et Protocole relatif au Statut des Réfugiés”, UNHCR, consulté le 5 décembre 2020, p.16

[27] Conseil de l’Europe, « Convention du Conseil de l’Europe sur la prévention et la lutte contre la violence à l’égard des femmes et la violence domestique – Istanbul, 11.V.2011 », site web du Conseil de l’Europe, consulté le 5 décembre 2020, p.18

[28]Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Institute for Gender Equality, « Gender mainstreaming- Sectoral brief: Gender and Migration”, European institute for Gender Equality, 2020, p.5

[29] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Hooper, Louise, “GENDER-BASED ASYLUM CLAIMS AND NON-REFOULEMENT: ARTICLES 60 AND 61 OF THE ISTANBUL CONVENTION – A collection of papers on the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence”, Council of Europe, December 2019, p.19

[30] Council of Europe, “Istanbul Convention- Action against violence against women and domestic violence- Text of the Convention”, Council of Europe website, 1st July 2019

[31] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Liebig, Thomas, and Tronstad, Kristian Rose, “Triple Disadvantage ? A first overview of the integration of refugee women”, OECD, 2018, p.10

[32] Tabaud, Anne-Lise, « Explaining the main drivers of anti-immigration attitudes in Europe”, EU-Logos Athena, 4 November 2020

[33] « Alors que 60% des hommes réfugiés sont entrés par le canal de l’asile, seulement 38% des femmes réfugiées sont entrées par ce canal », Traduction libre de l’auteur, Liebig, Thomas, and Tronstad, Kristian Rose, “Triple Disadvantage ? A first overview of the integration of refugee women”, OECD, 2018, p.14

[34] Ibid, p. 10

[35] Ibid, p. 25

[36] Ibid, p. 31

[37] Ibid

[38] Ibid

[39] Ibid, p.32

[40] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Taran, Patrick, « Migrant Women, Women Migrant Workers – Crucial challenges for Rights-based Action and Advocacy”, OHCHR, 21 July 2016, p.1

[41]Ibid

[42] Ibid, p.2

[43] Galloti, Maria, « Migrant Domestic Workers Across the World: global and regional estimates”, International Labour Organization, 2016, p.2 

[44] Traduction libre de l’auteur, European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, “Severe labour exploitation: workers moving within or into the European Union”, FRA – European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, 2015, p.15

[45] Ibid, p.53

[46] Ibid, p.15

[47] Ibid, p.17

[48] Ibid, p.19

[49] Ibid

[50] Ibid, p.56

[51] Traduction libre de l’auteur, International Organization for Migration, « Crushed hopes : underemployement and deskilling among skilled migrant women”, IOM, 2012, p. 23

[52] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Li, Monica, “Integration of migrant women: a key challenge with limited policy resources”, European Commission, 12 November 2018

[53] Commission européenne, “COMMUNICATION DE LA COMMISSION AU PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN, AU CONSEIL, AU COMITÉ ÉCONOMIQUE ET SOCIAL EUROPÉEN ET AU COMITÉ DES RÉGIONS sur un nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile – COM (2020) 609 final », Commission européenne, 23 septembre 2020

[54] European Institute for Gender Equality, “What is gender mainstreaming”, European Institute for Gender Equality website, 2020

[55] Cascone, Noemi, and Knoll, Anna, “Promoting Gender in the EU external response to migration: the case of the Trust Fund for Africa”, The European Center for development Policy Management, October 2018, p. 8

[56] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Ibid, p.13

[57] Ibid, p.17

Anne-Lise Tabaud

Étudiante dans le Master de Relations Internationales à Sciences Po Bordeaux, je suis intéressée par les politiques de développement international. J'ai notamment pour ambition de me perfectionner sur les questions liées à la gestion et à la protection des réfugiés dans le monde, et particulièrement en Europe. À travers mon travail d'analyste politique à EU-Logos Athéna, je souhaite apporter un éclairage sur les actions que l'Union Européenne et ses États membres mènent dans le domaine de la migration et de l'asile.

Laisser un commentaire

Fermer le menu