Explaining the main drivers of anti-immigration attitudes in Europe

Explaining the main drivers of anti-immigration attitudes in Europe

[FRENCH VERSION BELOW]
[VERSION FRANCAISE PLUS BAS]

In the midst of the European Commission’s New Pact on Migration and Asylum debate advocated by the European Commission [COM(2020) 609, 23.9.2020], it is interesting to assess the public opinion about immigrants, and immigration, in Europe.

According to the 2017 Special Eurobarometer 469 “Integration of immigrants in the European Union” (Figure 1), “38% of Europeans think that immigration from outside the EU is more of a problem than an opportunity”[1]. This number varies across European countries. It is not a surprise that Hungary, which is known for its anti-immigration stance, is the country where the percentage is the highest (63%), whereas Sweden, known for its overall pro-immigration attitude, counts 19%, one of the lowest percentages.

Figure 1

Therefore, in some European countries, the negative perception of migrants is still prevalent. Rather than assessing the fluctuation of the anti-immigrant sentiment in Europe, this article will try to explain the main drivers of anti-immigrant attitudes, linking several theories on the subject with facts. In this article, we will talk about the anti-immigrant feeling towards immigrants from non-European countries, especially Middle Eastern and African countries, since they were the main countries of origin during the 2015/16 migrant’s crisis.

 This article’s aim is not to criticize the anti-immigrant sentiment, but rather trying to understand what leads to the development of these attitudes.

A threat-driven fear of immigration

The main driver of anti-immigrant attitudes is the perception of a threat, fueling fears that immigrants will have a negative impact on one’s way of life. This fear is explained by sociologists through the “group-threat theory”[2]. In this theory, when an out-group enters a country (in this case, migrants), the in-group (the hosting country’s citizens) tends to perceive them as a threat to their resources, because they will compete for them. This perception is generated by the anticipation of negative outcomes related to the migrants’ arrival, and fuels anti-immigrant attitudes[3]. The competition can occur over “tangible (e.g., housing or labor market issues) as well as intangible goods (e.g., religious or language issues)”[4]. Therefore, most of the academic studies explaining opposition to immigration and immigrants retain two main threats: the realistic threat, which has an economic and security dimension, and the symbolic threat[5], which is about national identity, values and clash of cultures.

The realistic threat

The realistic threat applied to anti-immigrant sentiment relies on the assumption that host countries’ citizens will perceive immigrants as an economic threat and financial burden, but also as a physical security threat.

A perceived economic threat and financial burden

The Dublin regulation, implemented by the EU to avoid “asylum shopping”, is a striking example of the perceived economic and fiscal threat of migrants. Indeed, behind one aspect of this term, there is the perception that migrants are going to cheat the asylum system to choose the country with the best social benefits. Thus, it shows that native workers fear that a massive arrival of migrants will threaten their jobs and wages, but above all, these migrants would become a financial burden by taking advantage of the benefits[6].

As Figure 2[7] shows, if the financial burden concern seems confirmed, the economic one is more ambiguous. Indeed, more European citizens tend to agree rather than disagree to the statement that immigrants are a burden to the welfare system (total agree : 56%, total disagree: 38%). However, more people tend to disagree to the assumption that immigrants “take jobs away from workers” (total disagree: 57%, total agree: 39%).

Figure 2

Therefore, it seems that the fiscal threat weights more than the economic one when analyzing anti-immigrant attitudes.

            The physical security concerns

The other aspect of the realistic threat is the security one. This security dimension is significant when speaking about contemporary anti-immigrant attitudes. Indeed, the specter of ISIS has considerably increased fears of migrants coming from Middle Eastern countries. Indeed, one of the problems intrinsic to the migrant crisis was the poor management of European borders, which did not allow an efficient identification of migrants. This mismanagement gave the impression that terrorists could easily enter Europe through migration routes. After the November 2015 Paris terrorist attacks, these security concerns grew significantly, since one of the perpetrators of the attacks allegedly entered Europe as a refugee. And rapidly, some people mixed up immigration with the terrorist attacks[8]. However, Legewie’s research on the subject revealed that the effect of terrorist attacks is profound in the short term but tends to decrease in the long term[9].

Along with terrorist concerns, immigration is often seen as worsening crime levels in a country. As Figure 2 (above) highlights, there are more than half of European citizens that agree with the statement that immigrants “worsen crime problems” in a country (55%). Again, this fear is boosted when a crime involving migrants happens. For example, the events in Germany of New Year’s Eve 2015 (December 31, 2015), when immigrant men were accused and condemned for assaulting women, fueled negative attitudes towards immigrants among Germans[10]

As a matter of fact, when people need to choose between their own physical security or human rights concerns, for some security will prevail[11]. It is the same when dealing with economic or financial issues. And this is why, the only consensus that exists for the New Pact on Migration and Asylum is about the securitization of the frontier and pushing back migrants. 

The symbolic threat

            A perceived threat to national identity, culture and values

The anti-immigrant attitudes are not only motivated by economic or security concerns, but also by more intangible ones, such as national identity, culture and values. This perceived threat led, in the US but also in Europe, to the development of “nativism”. The latter is “a philosophical position, sometimes translated into a movement, whose primary goal is to restrict immigration in order to maintain some deemed essential characteristics of a given political unit”[12]. Nativists are often related to right-wing parties. Actually, they are also found in leftist parties. This nativism is indeed not about left/right division but more as a us/them division[13]. This concept existed before the migrant crisis but was increasingly put in the spotlight after the 2015/16 crisis, due to the rhetoric of some parties in a context of fear for the national identity.

Several examples of this “symbolic threat” related to immigration can be found across Europe. For instance, in France, a 2017 survey found that 72% of the French people think that immigration threatens their way of life[14]. More surprisingly, it also showed that 48% of French people believe in the “grand remplacement” theory[15]. This conspiracy-theory, developed by Renaud Camus in his 2011 book “Le grand remplacement”[16], claims that immigration is “a political project of replacement of one civilization by another deliberately organized by our political, intellectual and media elites”[17]. These figures, therefore, show that the symbolic threat holds an important place in representations of immigration in France.

            A symbolic threat often related to racial prejudice

The “symbolic threat” can also be related to a racial prejudice[18]. Intra-European immigration tends to be more accepted than non-European/non-white immigration[19]. When it comes to the Muslim community, the racial prejudice tends to be stronger. According to a 2016 Pew Research Center’s publication, views of Muslims are more negative in Eastern and Southern Europe. For example, in Hungary, 72% of the people interviewed have a negative view of Muslims (Figure 3)[20]. As we stated before, Hungary is one of the European countries where the anti-immigrant sentiment is the strongest. Therefore, we can assume that racial prejudice against Muslims is related to negative attitudes towards immigrants. The other way around, in Sweden, less people have negative views of Muslims, and less people have negative attitudes against migrants.

Figure 3

These attitudes can be explained by the fact that, in the eyes of the host country’s natives, these migrants carry new culture and values, and so they feel they will threaten their identity. At the European scale, an example of this perceived menace can be found in the Time magazine publication of February 28, 2005. It is a dossier analyzing “the identity crisis of Europe” and it “presented on its cover a reproduction of Mona Lisa wearing a veil, with Islamic connotations”[21].

            Realistic or symbolic, perceived threats depend on several elements such as the context, the immigration history, the stance towards integration, but also the proportion of immigrants in a country.

Group-threat versus intergroup contact : What is the importance of the size of the immigrant group?

According to the “group-threat theory”, anti-immigrant sentiment becomes stronger when the out-group (the immigrants) threatens to overrun the in-group (nationals of the host country)[22].

Consequently, did the large inflow of asylum seekers in 2015/16 to Europe led to a rise in anti-immigrant attitudes?

According to the group threat theory, we would say yes. However, the answer is more nuanced across European countries. As we can see in Figure 4[23], in some Eastern European countries that were directly impacted by the crisis, such as Hungary at its beginning, rejection increased and perception of migrants became more negative. In some other European countries, it is the opposite (mainly Western European countries). How can we explain that?

Figure 4

Part of the explanation can be found in the intergroup contact theory. This theory states that “Positive nurtured contact with individuals from a different ethnic or national group leads to a more positive attitude toward that group”[24]. Indeed, the more people engage in positive interactions; the more positive attitudes increase. Comparing the two graphs, Figure 5[25] puts forward the benefits of intergroup contacts. Taking two opposite countries, Sweden and Bulgaria: 52% of Swedish have daily interactions with immigrants compared to 1% of Bulgarians; 85% of Swedish have a positive perception of the impact of immigrants on society, whereas Bulgarians are only 18%. Thus, we can acknowledge the positive effect of interactions on attitudes towards immigrants.

Figure 5

Greece is an interesting case as 57% of Greeks have daily interactions with immigrants, but only 28% of Greeks think that migrants have a positive impact on society. This finding can be explained by the fact that Greece is one of the countries that still needs to manage influx on migrants on its shores. As the camp Moria’s fire, or the Samos riots showed, this situation creates tensions between Greeks and newly arrived migrants. Thus, this example confirms that intergroup contact participates in increasing positive attitudes towards immigrants, only if these contacts are positive too. 

Political framing’s impact on anti-immigrant attitudes

Immigration is a highly political issue. Indeed, as the Brexit campaign revealed, attitudes towards immigration in the public opinion can be a determinant for political actors. Conversely, the Brexit campaign also showed that the immigration issue can be instrumentalized by politicians or parties for their own interests. It is the case of right-wing populist parties, that have constructed their rhetoric on immigration. For example, the leader of the right-wing populist Party for Freedom in the Netherlands, Geert Wilders, instrumentalized concerns about the arrival of refugees after the 2015 Paris attacks. He said that “The West was “at war” with Islam”[26], and used that instrumentalization of fear throughout the 2017 Dutch elections. By calling on the “symbolic threat” of Muslim immigration, he tried to attract people’s attention to gain votes. Therefore, these individuals or groups tend to frame the debate and the perceptions of immigration. This is why politicians play a role in defining anti-immigrant attitudes.

Media and misinformation

Media framing: focusing on some aspects of immigration

Media can have a relatively big role in framing the debate about migration, by centering the attention on certain aspects of this issue. Indeed, they are an important source of information, and so people’s exposure to certain media and information can shape their attitudes towards migration. For example, in Italy, “in 2017 media reports about migration were numerous, especially regarding incoming migration flows, which accounted for 44 percent of news; cases of crimes committed by migrants of asylum seekers totaled 16 percent of news”[27]. Adding Figure 6’s results[28], we can see that Italians tend to relate immigrants to the crime problem in their country more than the average Europeans (75% Italians agree, whereas 55% of Europeans agree). Hence, media framing influences the perception of immigrants.

Figure 6

Besides, “press freedom and ownership”[29] is significant in the formation of public attitudes towards immigration. This assumption relates to the one that political framing is important. Indeed, when politicians own media, they can influence the media coverage of immigration. And even if they do not own media, a country’s leaders can affect the media coverage of immigration by limiting press freedom[30]. If these leaders or politicians are anti-immigrant, they can choose to favor negative media coverage of the issue. As put forward by Huddleston and Sharif, “Researchers argue that Hungary’s ruling Fidesz party has taken indirect and direct control of 90% of media outlets (Dragomir, 2017)”[31]. Therefore, the strength of anti-immigrant attitudes in Hungary is influenced by its leader’s party views on this matter. Selective exposure through social media strengthens anti-immigrant attitudes.

Selective exposure through social media strengthens anti-immigrant attitudes

Social media tend to shape even more attitudes towards immigration, since they represent an open space to share opinions, but also where fake news thrive. The social networking platforms, such as Facebook or Twitter, allow a great flow of information that is often partial and not verified. Although these data are fake news, people still notice them, and shape their opinions. On November 17, 2015, Trump tweeted “Refugees from Syria are now pouring into our great country. Who knows who they are – some could be ISIS? Is our president insane?”[32]. Thus, Trump’s use of Twitter is the great example of how fake news can be used by politicians or interest groups[33] to shape public opinion and appeal to their fear. Regarding immigration, which is a controversial and sensitive issue, social media become a useful and powerful tool to appeal to insecurity and fear and boost anti-immigrant sentiments.

Besides, social media, with their algorithms, deepen what psychologists call “motivated reasoning”. It is “ a process by which information is molded to fit (one’s) existing views and the values of the group(s) (one’s) identify with (…) Information contradicting an individual’s sense of self or group identity is often rejected more forcefully than other data, regardless of the evidence backing it up”[34]. Therefore, social media’s algorithms tend to reinforce this behavior, since they lead to a selective media exposure that fits with one’s opinion. In brief, we hear what we want to hear, even if the facts contradict our beliefs. For instance, in general, Europeans tend to overestimate the proportion of immigrants in their country. However, there are disparities between countries. As we can see in Figure 7[35], countries that have a negative stance on immigration (such as the Visegrad group), are the countries where the distortion between facts and reality about the proportion of immigrants is the biggest. Part of the explanation relies on the fact that thinking immigrants are numerous in a country, even if statistics show the contrary, justifies the threat perception, and so anti-immigrant attitudes.

Figure 7

Therefore, the anti-immigrant sentiment is a complex issue with several drivers that need to be interlinked. In this article, drivers of anti-immigrant attitudes are analyzed at the group level. However, the individual level is also important to assess in this issue, since one’s education, age or financial struggles weight in the balance too[36]. Furthermore, in this article, several graphs are used in order to give an overview of European countries’ attitudes towards immigrants. It is important to underline the fact that each survey’s results depend on the way the survey was conducted: the sample, the way questions are asked, the words chosen for the question and the overall context in which the survey is done matter. Nevertheless, it helps understand how anti-immigrant attitudes are shaped, and a better understanding of this sentiment can help policy makers to counter it.


Annexes

Annex 1

Annex 2


[1] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, April 2018 (fieldwork in October 2017), p.57

To know the meaning of countries’ abbreviations, see Annex 1

[2] SCHLUETER, Elmar and SCHEEPERS, Peer, “The relationship between outgroup size and anti-outgroup attitudes: A theoretical synthesis and empirical test of group threat-and intergroup contact theory”, Social Science Research, 2010, vol. 39, no 2, p. 286

[3]Ibid

[4] Ibid

[5] VALA, Jorge, PEREIRA, Ccero, and RAMOS, Alice, “Racial prejudice, threat perception and opposition to immigration: A comparative analysis”, Portuguese Journal of Social Science, 2006, vol. 5, no 2, p.120

[6] Portail de la Solidarité Internationale, “ À quoi est dû le sentiment anti-immigration ? », France Terre d’Asile, 15 January 2014

[7] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, April 2018 (fieldwork in October 2017), p.71

[8]This assumption must be nuanced, since the increasing anti-immigrant sentiment related to terrorist attacks depends on several factors, such as the size of the immigration flow, the size of the immigrant group in the country, and also the economic and political contex, LEGEWIE, Joscha, “Terrorist events and attitudes toward immigrants: A natural experiment. American journal of sociology” 2013, vol. 118, no 5, p.7

[9]Ibid, p.29

[10]BANULESCU-BOGDAN, Natalia, « When Facts Don’t Matter: How to Communicate More Effectively about Immigration’s costs and Benefits”, Migration Policy Institute Research Report, November 2018, p.8

[11] LAHAV, Gallya and COURTEMANCHE, Marie, “The ideological effects of framing threat on immigration and civil liberties”, Political Behavior, 2012, vol. 34, no 3, p. 483.

[12] GUIA, Aitana, “The concept of nativism and anti-immigrant sentiments in Europe”, European University Institute – Max Weber Programme, 2016, p.11

[13] Ibid, p.1

[14] Ifop, « Enquête sur le complotisme », Fondation Jean-Jaurès and Conspiracy Watch, Décembre 2017, p.26

[15] Ibid

[16]AFP, « Le « grand remplacement », cette théorie complotiste néonazie qui a inspiré le terroriste de Christchurch », RTBF.be, 15 March 2019

[17]Ifop, « Enquête sur le complotisme », Fondation Jean-Jaurès and Conspiracy Watch, Décembre 2017, p.26

[18] “Racial prejudice is defined in the literature as a collection of negative attitudes ‘‘toward a socially defined group and toward any person perceived to be a member of that group’’ (Ashmore, 1970, p. 253)”, GORODZEISKY, Anastasia and SEMYONOV, Moshe, “Not only competitive threat but also racial prejudice: Sources of anti-immigrant attitudes in European societies”, International Journal of Public Opinion Research, 2016, vol. 28, no 3, p.4

[19] “The percentage of respondents expressing racial prejudice toward all non-Europeans/non-Whites ranges between 5% (in Sweden) and 22% (in Ireland) (…) Czech Republic, U.K., and Hungary (21%, 18%, and 18%, respectively) and (…) the Scandinavian countries (9% in Finland and Norway and 6% in Denmark). The percentage of individuals holding prejudicial views in the other countries falls around the European mean (14.5), ranging from 16% in Belgium, France, and Slovakia to 14% in Bulgaria and Poland, and 13% in Germany and Spain”, Ibid, p.10

[20] WIKE, Richard, STOKES, Bruce and SIMMONS Katie, “European Fear Wave of Refugees Will Mean More Terrorism, Fewer Jobs”, Pew Research Center, 11 July 2016

[21] VALA, Jorge, PEREIRA, Ccero, and RAMOS, Alice, “Racial prejudice, threat perception and opposition to immigration: A comparative analysis”, Portuguese Journal of Social Science, 2006, vol. 5, no 2, p.122

[22] SCHLUETER, Elmar and SCHEEPERS, Peer, “The relationship between outgroup size and anti-outgroup attitudes: A theoretical synthesis and empirical test of group threat-and intergroup contact theory”, Social Science Research, 2010, vol. 39, no 2, p. 285

[23] MESSING, Vera et SÁGVÁRI, Bence, « Still divided, but more open: Mapping European attitudes towards migration before and after the migration crisis”, Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, 2019, vol. 90, p.15

[24] Free Translation of the author, « contact positif nourri avec des individus d’un groupe ethnique ou national différent entraîne une attitude plus positive envers ledit groupe », Portail de la Solidarité Internationale, “ À quoi est dû le sentiment anti-immigration ? », France Terre d’Asile, 15 January 2014

[25] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, April 2018 (fieldwork in October 2017), p.27 & 72

[26] BANULESCU-BOGDAN, Natalia, « When Facts Don’t Matter: How to Communicate More Effectively about Immigration’s costs and Benefits”, Migration Policy Institute Research Report, November 2018, p.8

[27] DEMPSEY, Judy, “Judy Asks: Is Europe Afraid of Migration? ANNALISA CAMILLI- Journalist at Internazionale », Carnegie Europe, 13 September 2018

[28] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, April 2018 (fieldwork in October 2017), p. T30

[29]HUDDLESTON, Thomas, and SHARIF, Hind, “Discussion Brief – Who is reshaping public opinion on the EU’s migration policies?”, RESOMA- Research Social Platform on Migration and Asylum, July 2019, p.17

[30]Ibid

[31] Ibid

[32] https://twitter.com/realdonaldtrump/status/666615398574530560?lang=fr

[33] “A group of people that seeks to influence public policy on the basis of a particular common interest or concern”, Lexico, “Interest group”, Lexico Website, 2020 

[34]BANULESCU-BOGDAN, Natalia, « When Facts Don’t Matter: How to Communicate More Effectively about Immigration’s costs and Benefits”, Migration Policy Institute Research Report, November 2018, p.1

[35] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, April 2018 (fieldwork in October 2017), p. 21

[36] See Annex 2


Expliquer les principaux moteurs des attitudes anti-immigration en Europe

En plein débat sur le nouveau pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile préconisé par Commission européenne [COM(2020) 609, 23.9.2020], il est intéressant d’évaluer l’opinion publique sur les immigrants, et l’immigration, en Europe.

Selon l’Eurobaromètre spécial 469 de 2017 sur l’intégration des immigrants dans l’Union européenne (Image 1), « 38% des Européens pensent que l’immigration en provenance de pays tiers est plus un problème qu’une opportunité »[1]. Ce chiffre varie d’un pays européen à l’autre. Il n’est pas surprenant que la Hongrie, connue pour son attitude anti-immigration, soit le pays où le pourcentage est le plus élevé (63 %), alors que la Suède, connue pour son attitude globalement pro-immigration, compte 19 % de personnes ayant cette opinion, soit l’un des pourcentages les plus faibles.

Image 1[2]

Ainsi, dans certains pays européens, la perception négative des migrants est encore très répandue. Plutôt que d’évaluer la fluctuation du sentiment anti-immigrants en Europe, cet article tentera d’expliquer les principaux moteurs des attitudes anti-immigration, en illustrant plusieurs théories sur le sujet avec des faits. Dans cet article, nous parlerons du sentiment anti-immigration envers les immigrants des pays non européens, en particulier des pays du Moyen-Orient et d’Afrique, puisqu’ils ont été les principaux pays d’origine lors de la crise des migrants de 2015/16.

            L’objectif de cet article n’est pas de critiquer le sentiment anti-immigrants, mais plutôt d’essayer de comprendre ses causes.

Une peur de l’immigration, perçue comme une menace

Le principal moteur des attitudes anti-immigrants est la perception d’une menace, qui alimente la crainte que les immigrants aient un impact négatif sur le mode de vie de chacun. Cette crainte est expliquée par les sociologues à travers la « théorie de la menace intergroupe »[3]. Selon cette théorie, lorsqu’un « out-group » entre dans un pays (dans ce cas, les migrants), le « in-group » (les citoyens du pays d’accueil) a tendance à les percevoir comme une menace pour leurs ressources, car ils vont se faire concurrence pour les obtenir. Cette perception d’une menace est donc générée par l’anticipation de retombées négatives liées à l’arrivée des migrants, qui nourrit les attitudes anti-immigrants[4]. Cette concurrence peut porter sur des biens « tangibles (par exemple, le logement ou le marché du travail) ou intangibles (par exemple, les questions religieuses ou linguistiques) »[5]. Par conséquent, la plupart des études universitaires qui expliquent l’opposition à l’immigration et aux immigrants retiennent deux menaces principales : la menace réaliste, qui a une dimension économique et sécuritaire, et la menace symbolique[6] qui concerne l’identité nationale, les valeurs et le choc des cultures.

La menace réaliste

La menace réaliste appliquée au sentiment anti-immigration repose sur l’hypothèse que les citoyens des pays d’accueil ont tendance à percevoir les immigrants comme une menace économique et un fardeau financier, mais aussi comme une menace pour la sécurité physique.

Une menace économique et un fardeau financier

Le règlement de Dublin, mis en œuvre par l’UE pour éviter l’« asylum shopping », est un exemple frappant du fait que les Européens conçoivent les migrants comme une menace économique et budgétaire. En effet, derrière cette expression se cache l’idée que les migrants vont tromper le système d’asile pour choisir le pays offrant les meilleurs avantages sociaux. Ainsi, ce terme montre que les travailleurs natifs du pays d’accueil craignent qu’une arrivée massive de migrants ne menace leur emploi et leur salaire, mais surtout que ces migrants deviennent une charge financière en profitant des avantages sociaux[7].

Comme le montre l’Image 2[8], si le souci de la charge financière semble confirmé, celui de la menace économique est plus ambigu. En effet, plus de citoyens européens ont tendance à être en accord plutôt qu’en désaccord avec l’affirmation selon laquelle les immigrants sont une charge pour le système de protection sociale (total en accord : 56%, total en désaccord : 38%). Cependant, plus de personnes ont tendance à être en désaccord avec l’hypothèse selon laquelle les immigrants « enlèvent des emplois aux travailleurs (Traduction libre de l’auteur) » (total en désaccord : 57%, total en accord : 39%).

Image 2

Il semble donc que la menace fiscale pèse plus lourd que la menace économique dans l’analyse des attitudes anti-immigration.

            Les préoccupations en matière de sécurité physique

L’autre aspect de la menace réaliste est celui de la sécurité. Cette dimension sécuritaire est importante lorsqu’on parle des attitudes anti-immigrants de nos jours. Le spectre de la menace de l’État islamique sur la population européenne a considérablement accru les craintes envers les migrants en provenance des pays du Moyen-Orient. En effet, l’un des problèmes intrinsèques à la crise des migrants était la mauvaise gestion des frontières européennes, qui ne permettait pas une identification efficace des migrants. Cette mauvaise gestion a donné l’impression que les terroristes pouvaient entrer facilement en Europe par les routes migratoires. Après les attaques terroristes de novembre 2015 à Paris, ces préoccupations en matière de sécurité se sont considérablement accrues, puisque l’un de ses auteurs est présumé être entré en Europe en tant que réfugié. Rapidement, certaines personnes ont fait l’amalgame entre l’immigration et les attentats terroristes[9]. Toutefois, les recherches de Legewie sur le sujet ont révélé que l’effet négatif des attaques terroristes sur le sentiment anti-immigrants est profond à court terme mais tend à diminuer sur le long terme[10].

Outre les préoccupations liées au terrorisme, l’immigration est souvent perçue comme un aggravateur de la criminalité dans un pays. Comme le montre l’Image 2 (ci-dessus), plus de la moitié des citoyens européens sont en accord avec l’affirmation selon laquelle les immigrants « aggravent les problèmes de criminalité (Traduction libre de l’auteur)  » dans un pays (55 %). Là encore, cette crainte est renforcée lorsque qu’un crime impliquant des migrants se produit. Par exemple, les événements survenus en Allemagne à la veille du Nouvel An 2015, lorsque des hommes immigrés ont été accusés et condamnés pour avoir agressé des femmes, ont alimenté les attitudes négatives des Allemands envers les immigrés[11]

En réalité, lorsque les personnes doivent choisir entre leur propre sécurité physique ou leurs préoccupations en matière de droits de l’homme, pour certains, c’est la sécurité qui prévaut.[12] Il en va de même lorsqu’il s’agit de questions économiques ou financières. Et c’est pourquoi le seul consensus qui existe pour le nouveau pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile concerne la sécurisation de la frontière et le refoulement des migrants. 

La menace symbolique

            La perception d’une menace pour l’identité nationale, la culture et les valeurs

Le rejet des immigrants n’est pas seulement motivé par des préoccupations économiques ou sécuritaires, mais aussi par des préoccupations plus intangibles, telles que l’identité nationale, la culture et les valeurs. Cette menace perçue a conduit, aux États-Unis mais aussi en Europe, au développement du « nativisme ». Il s’agit d’une « position philosophique, parfois traduite en un mouvement, dont le but premier est de restreindre l’immigration afin de maintenir certaines caractéristiques jugées essentielles d’une unité politique donnée »[13] . Les adeptes du nativisme sont souvent liés à des partis de droite, mais on les retrouve également dans les partis de gauche. Ce nativisme n’est en fait pas une division gauche/droite, mais plutôt une division eux/nous[14]. Ce concept existait avant la crise des migrants, mais il a été de plus en plus mis en avant après la crise de 2015/16, en raison de la rhétorique de certains partis dans un contexte de crainte pour l’identité nationale.

On trouve plusieurs exemples de cette menace symbolique liée à l’immigration dans toute l’Europe. En France, par exemple, une enquête réalisée en 2017 a révélé que 72 % des Français pensent que l’immigration menace leur mode de vie[15]. Plus surprenant encore, elle a également montré que 48 % des Français croient à la théorie du « grand remplacement »[16] . Cette théorie du complot, développée par Renaud Camus dans un livre publié en 2011, « Le grand remplacement »[17], affirme que l’immigration est « un projet politique de remplacement d’une civilisation par une autre organisé délibérément par nos élites politiques, intellectuelles et médiatiques et auquel il convient de mettre fin en renvoyant ces populations d’où elles viennent »[18]. Ces chiffres montrent donc que la menace symbolique tient une place importante dans les représentations de l’immigration en France.

            Une menace symbolique souvent liée aux préjugés raciaux

La menace symbolique peut également être liée à un préjugé racial[19]. L’immigration intra-européenne tend à être mieux acceptée que l’immigration non européenne/non blanche[20].

En ce qui concerne la communauté musulmane, les préjugés raciaux ont tendance à être plus ancrés. Selon une publication du Pew Research Center de 2016, les opinions envers les musulmans sont plus négatives en Europe de l’Est et du Sud. Par exemple, en Hongrie, 72 % des personnes interrogées ont une opinion négative des musulmans (Image 3)[21]. Comme nous l’avons vu précédemment, la Hongrie est l’un des pays européens où le sentiment anti-immigrants est le plus fort. Nous pouvons donc supposer que les préjugés raciaux contre les musulmans sont liés aux attitudes négatives envers les immigrants. À l’inverse, en Suède, moins de gens ont une opinion négative des musulmans et moins de gens ont des attitudes négatives à l’égard des immigrés.

Image 3

Ces attitudes s’expliquent par le fait qu’aux yeux des natifs du pays d’accueil, ces migrants sont porteurs d’une nouvelle culture et de nouvelles valeurs. Les natifs ont donc le sentiment qu’ils vont menacer leur identité. Un exemple à l’échelle européenne de cette préoccupation se trouve dans la publication du Time magazine du 28 février 2005. Il s’agit d’un dossier analysant « la crise d’identité de l’Europe », et qui « présente sur sa couverture une reproduction de la Joconde portant un voile, à connotation islamique »[22].

Réalistes ou symboliques, les menaces perçues dépendent de plusieurs éléments tels que le contexte, l’histoire de l’immigration d’un pays, l’opinion à l’égard de l’intégration, mais aussi la proportion d’immigrants dans un pays.

Menace intergroupe ou contact intergroupe : Quelle est l’importance de la taille du groupe d’immigrants ?

Selon la « théorie de la menace intergroupe », les attitudes négatives envers les immigrants deviennent plus fortes lorsque « l’out-group » (les immigrants) menace de dépasser « l’in-group » (les ressortissants du pays d’accueil)[23].

Par conséquent, l’afflux important de demandeurs d’asile en 2015/16 en Europe a-t-il entraîné cette croissance des attitudes anti-immigration ?

Selon la théorie de la menace intergroupe, nous pourrions penser que oui. Cependant, la réponse est plus nuancée selon les pays européens. Comme nous pouvons le voir sur l’Image 4[24], dans certains pays d’Europe de l’Est qui ont été directement touchés par la crise, comme la Hongrie au début de celle-ci, le rejet des migrants a augmenté et la perception est devenue plus négative. Dans certains autres pays européens, c’est le contraire (principalement les pays d’Europe occidentale). Comment expliquer cela ?

Image 4

Une partie de l’explication se trouve dans la théorie du contact intergroupe. Selon cette théorie, un « contact positif nourri avec des individus d’un groupe ethnique ou national différent entraîne une attitude plus positive envers ledit groupe »[25]. En effet, plus les gens s’engagent dans des interactions positives et plus les attitudes positives augmentent. La comparaison des deux graphiques de l’Image 5[26] met en avant les avantages des contacts intergroupes. Prenons deux pays opposés, la Suède et la Bulgarie : 52 % des Suédois ont des interactions quotidiennes avec les immigrants contre 1 % des Bulgares ; 85 % des Suédois ont une perception positive de l’impact des immigrants sur la société, alors que les Bulgares ne sont que 18 %. On peut donc reconnaître l’effet positif des interactions sur les attitudes à l’égard des immigrés.

Image 5

La Grèce est un cas intéressant. 57 % des Grecs ont des interactions quotidiennes avec les immigrants, mais seulement 28 % des Grecs pensent que les migrants ont un impact positif sur la société. Ce constat s’explique par le fait que la Grèce est l’un des pays qui doit encore gérer l’afflux de migrants sur ses côtes. Comme l’ont montré l’incendie du camp Moria ou les émeutes de Samos, cette situation crée des tensions entre les Grecs et les migrants nouvellement arrivés. Ainsi, cet exemple confirme que les contacts entre groupes participent à l’augmentation des attitudes positives envers les immigrants, à condition que ces contacts soient également positifs. 

L’impact de l’instrumentalisation politique de l’immigration sur les attitudes anti-immigrants

L’immigration est une question hautement politique. En effet, comme l’a révélé la campagne du Brexit, l’opinion publique à l’égard de l’immigration peut être déterminante pour les acteurs politiques. Inversement, la campagne de Brexit a également montré que la question de l’immigration peut être instrumentalisée par les politiciens ou les partis politiques pour leurs propres intérêts. C’est le cas des partis populistes de droite, qui ont construit leur rhétorique sur l’immigration. Par exemple, le leader du parti populiste de droite Parti pour la Liberté aux Pays-Bas, Geert Wilders, a instrumentalisé les inquiétudes concernant l’arrivée de réfugiés après les attentats de Paris en 2015. Il a déclaré que « l’Occident était « en guerre » contre l’Islam »[27], et a utilisé cette instrumentalisation de la peur tout au long des élections néerlandaises de 2017. En faisant appel à la menace symbolique de l’immigration musulmane, il a tenté d’attirer l’attention des électeurs pour gagner des voix. Ces individus ou groupes ont donc tendance à influencer le débat et les perceptions de l’immigration. C’est pourquoi les politiciens jouent un rôle dans la définition des attitudes anti-immigrants.

Médias et désinformation

Cadrage des médias : se focaliser sur certains aspects de l’immigration

Les médias peuvent jouer un rôle relativement important dans le cadrage du débat sur la migration, en concentrant l’attention sur certains aspects de cette question. En effet, ils constituent une source d’information importante, et l’exposition des gens à certains médias et informations peut donc influencer leur attitude à l’égard de la migration. Par exemple, en Italie, « en 2017, les reportages des médias sur les migrations ont été nombreux, en particulier en ce qui concerne les flux migratoires entrants, qui ont représenté 44 % des nouvelles ; les cas de crimes commis par des migrants ou des demandeurs d’asile ont représenté 16 % des nouvelles »[28]. Si l’on ajoute les résultats de l’Image 6[29], on constate que les Italiens ont tendance à associer les immigrants au problème de la criminalité dans leur pays plus que la moyenne des Européens (75 % des Italiens sont en accord, alors que 55 % des Européens sont en accord). Le cadrage médiatique influence donc la perception des immigrés chez les Européens.

Image 6

En outre, la « liberté et la propriété de la presse »[30] jouent un rôle important dans la formation de l’attitude du public à l’égard de l’immigration. Cette théorie est liée à celle selon laquelle le cadrage politique est important. En effet, lorsque les dirigeants d’un pays limitent la liberté de la presse et que les politiciens possèdent des médias, ils peuvent influencer la couverture médiatique de l’immigration[31]. Si ces dirigeants ou politiciens ont des opinions négatives sur l’immigration, ils peuvent choisir de favoriser une couverture médiatique négative de la question. Comme l’ont avancé Huddleston et Sharif, « les chercheurs affirment que le parti hongrois Fidesz, au pouvoir, a pris le contrôle direct et indirect de 90 % des médias (Dragomir, 2017) »[32]. Par conséquent, la force des attitudes anti-immigrants en Hongrie est influencée par les opinions du parti de son chef sur cette question.

Une exposition sélective par le biais des réseaux sociaux renforce les attitudes anti-immigrants

Les réseaux sociaux ont tendance à façonner encore plus les attitudes à l’égard de l’immigration, car ils représentent un espace ouvert pour partager des opinions, mais aussi où les « fake-news » prospèrent. Les réseaux sociaux, tels que Facebook ou Twitter, permettent un grand flux d’informations, souvent incomplètes et non vérifiées. Mais ces données, même s’il s’agit de « fake-news », sont remarquées par les utilisateurs et influencent leurs opinions. Le 17 novembre 2015, Trump a tweeté « Les réfugiés de Syrie affluent maintenant dans notre grand pays. Qui sait qui ils sont – certains pourraient être de l’État islamique? Notre président est-il fou ? »[33]. Ainsi, l’utilisation de Twitter par Trump est le parfait exemple de la façon dont les « fake-news » peuvent être utilisées par les politiciens ou les groupes d’intérêt[34] pour façonner l’opinion publique et faire appel à ses peurs. En ce qui concerne l’immigration, qui est une question controversée et sensible, les réseaux sociaux deviennent un outil utile et puissant pour attirer l’attention sur l’insécurité et la peur et renforcer les sentiments anti-immigrants.

Par ailleurs, les algorithmes des réseaux sociaux approfondissent ce que les psychologues appellent le « raisonnement motivé ». Il s’agit d’un « processus par lequel l’information est modelée pour correspondre aux opinions existantes et aux valeurs du (des) groupe(s) auquel (auxquels) on s’identifie (…) Les informations qui contredisent le sentiment d’identité d’un individu ou d’un groupe sont souvent rejetées avec plus de force que les autres données, indépendamment des preuves qui les étayent »[35]. Les algorithmes des réseaux sociaux ont donc tendance à renforcer ce comportement, puisqu’ils conduisent à une exposition médiatique sélective qui correspond à l’opinion de chacun. En bref, nous entendons ce que nous voulons entendre, et nous rejetons les faits qui contredisent nos convictions. Par exemple, en général, les Européens ont tendance à surestimer la proportion d’immigrés dans leur pays, même s’il existe des disparités. Comme nous pouvons le voir dans l’Image 7[36], les pays qui ont une position négative sur l’immigration (comme le groupe de Visegrad) sont ceux où la distorsion entre les faits et la réalité concernant la proportion d’immigrants est la plus importante. Penser que les immigrants sont nombreux dans un pays, même si les statistiques montrent le contraire, justifie la perception de la menace, et donc les attitudes anti-immigrants. Cela peut donner une explication à ce phénomène de distorsion.

Image 7

Ainsi, le sentiment anti-immigrants est une question complexe dont l’explication est possible en liant plusieurs facteurs. Dans le présent article, les déterminants des attitudes anti-immigration sont analysés au niveau du groupe. Cependant, il est également important d’évaluer le niveau individuel, car l’éducation, l’âge ou les difficultés financières d’une personne pèsent également dans la balance[37]. En outre, dans cet article, plusieurs graphiques sont utilisés afin de donner un aperçu des attitudes des pays européens envers les immigrants. Il est important de souligner le fait que les résultats de chaque enquête dépendent de la manière dont elle a été menée : l’échantillon, la manière dont les questions sont posées, les mots choisis pour la question, le contexte général dans lequel l’enquête est réalisée ont leur importance. Néanmoins, cela permet de comprendre comment les attitudes anti-immigrants sont façonnées. Cela permet ainsi une meilleure compréhension de ce sentiment et peut aider les décideurs politiques à le contrer.


Annexes

Annexe 1

Annexe 2


[1]Traduction libre de l’auteur, TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, avril 2018 (enquête de terrain en octobre 2017), p.57

Pour connaître la signification des abréviations des pays, voir Annexe 1

[2] Ibid, p.58

[3] Traduction libre de l’auteur, SCHLUETER, Elmar and SCHEEPERS, Peer, “The relationship between outgroup size and anti-outgroup attitudes: A theoretical synthesis and empirical test of group threat-and intergroup contact theory”, Social Science Research, 2010, vol. 39, no 2, p. 286

[4] Ibid

[5] Traduction libre de l’auteur , Ibid

[6] VALA, Jorge, PEREIRA, Ccero, and RAMOS, Alice, “Racial prejudice, threat perception and opposition to immigration: A comparative analysis”, Portuguese Journal of Social Science, 2006, vol. 5, no 2, p.120

[7] Portail de la Solidarité Internationale, « À quoi est dû le sentiment anti-immigration ? », France Terre d’Asile, 15 janvier 2014

[8] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, avril 2018 (enquête de terrain en octobre 2017), p.71

[9] Cette hypothèse doit être nuancée, car le sentiment anti-immigrants croissant lié aux attaques terroristes dépend de plusieurs facteurs, tels que l’importance du flux d’immigration, la taille du groupe d’immigrants dans le pays, ainsi que le contexte économique et politique, LEGEWIE, Joscha, “Terrorist events and attitudes toward immigrants: A natural experiment. American journal of sociology” 2013, vol. 118, no 5, p.7

[10] Ibid, p.29

[11] BANULESCU-BOGDAN, Natalia, « When Facts Don’t Matter: How to Communicate More Effectively about Immigration’s costs and Benefits”, Migration Policy Institute Research Report, novembre 2018, p.8

[12] LAHAV, Gallya and COURTEMANCHE, Marie, “The ideological effects of framing threat on immigration and civil liberties”, Political Behavior, 2012, vol. 34, no 3, p. 483.

[13] Traduction libre de l’auteur, GUIA, Aitana, “The concept of nativism and anti-immigrant sentiments in Europe”, European University Institute – Max Weber Programme, 2016, p.11

[14] Ibid, p.1

[15] Ifop, « Enquête sur le complotisme », Fondation Jean-Jaurès and Conspiracy Watch, décembre 2017, p.26

[16] Ibid

[17] AFP, « Le « grand remplacement », cette théorie complotiste néonazie qui a inspiré le terroriste de Christchurch », RTBF.be, 15 mars 2019

[18]Ifop, « Enquête sur le complotisme », Fondation Jean-Jaurès and Conspiracy Watch, décembre 2017, p.26

[19] « Les préjugés raciaux sont définis dans la littérature comme un ensemble d’attitudes négatives « envers un groupe socialement défini et envers toute personne perçue comme membre de ce groupe (Ashmore, 1970, p. 253) » Traduction libre de l’auteur, GORODZEISKY, Anastasia and SEMYONOV, Moshe, “Not only competitive threat but also racial prejudice: Sources of anti-immigrant attitudes in European societies”, International Journal of Public Opinion Research, 2016, vol. 28, no 3, p.4

[20]« Le pourcentage de répondants exprimant des préjugés raciaux à l’égard de tous les non-européens / non-blancs varie entre 5% (en Suède) et 22% (en Irlande) (…) la République tchèque, le Royaume-Uni et la Hongrie (21%, 18% et 18%, respectivement) et (…) les pays scandinaves (9% en Finlande et en Norvège et 6% au Danemark). Le pourcentage de personnes ayant des préjugés raciaux dans les autres pays se situe autour de la moyenne européenne (14,5), allant de 16% en Belgique, en France et en Slovaquie à 14% en Bulgarie et en Pologne, et 13% en Allemagne et en Espagne » Traduction libre de l’auteur, Ibid, p.10

[21] WIKE, Richard, STOKES, Bruce and SIMMONS Katie, “European Fear Wave of Refugees Will Mean More Terrorism, Fewer Jobs”, Pew Research Center, 11 juillet 2016

[22] Traduction libre de l’auteur, VALA, Jorge, PEREIRA, Ccero, and RAMOS, Alice, “Racial prejudice, threat perception and opposition to immigration: A comparative analysis”, Portuguese Journal of Social Science, 2006, vol. 5, no 2, p.122

[23] SCHLUETER, Elmar and SCHEEPERS, Peer, “The relationship between outgroup size and anti-outgroup attitudes: A theoretical synthesis and empirical test of group threat-and intergroup contact theory”, Social Science Research, 2010, vol. 39, no 2, p. 285

[24] MESSING, Vera et SÁGVÁRI, Bence, « Still divided, but more open: Mapping European attitudes towards migration before and after the migration crisis”, Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, 2019, vol. 90, p.15

[25] Portail de la Solidarité Internationale, “ À quoi est dû le sentiment anti-immigration ? », France Terre d’Asile, 15 janvier 2014

[26] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, avril 2018 (enquête de terrain octobre 2017), p.27 et 72

[27] Traduction libre de l’auteur, BANULESCU-BOGDAN, Natalia, « When Facts Don’t Matter: How to Communicate More Effectively about Immigration’s costs and Benefits”, Migration Policy Institute Research Report, novembre 2018, p.8

[28] Traduction libre de l’auteur, DEMPSEY, Judy, “Judy Asks: Is Europe Afraid of Migration? ANNALISA CAMILLI- Journalist at Internazionale », Carnegie Europe, 13 septembre 2018

[29] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, avril 2018 (enquête de terrain octobre 2017), p. T30

[30] Traduction libre de l’auteur, HUDDLESTON, Thomas, and SHARIF, Hind, “Discussion Brief – Who is reshaping public opinion on the EU’s migration policies?”, RESOMA- Research Social Platform on Migration and Asylum, juillet 2019, p.17

[31] Ibid

[32] Traduction libre de l’auteur, Ibid

[33] Traduction libre de l’auteur, https://twitter.com/realdonaldtrump/status/666615398574530560?lang=fr

[34] « Un groupe de personnes qui cherche à influencer la politique publique sur la base d’un intérêt ou d’une préoccupation commune particulière » Traduction libre de l’auteur, Lexico, “Interest group”, Lexico Website, 2020 

[35] Traduction libre de l’auteur, BANULESCU-BOGDAN, Natalia, « When Facts Don’t Matter: How to Communicate More Effectively about Immigration’s costs and Benefits”, Migration Policy Institute Research Report, November 2018, p.1

[36] TNS opinion & political, and European Commission Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs, “Special Eurobarometer 469 : Integration of immigrants in the European Union- Report”, European Union, April 2018 (fieldwork in October 2017), p. 21

[37] Voir Annexe 2

Anne-Lise Tabaud

Étudiante dans le Master de Relations Internationales à Sciences Po Bordeaux, je suis intéressée par les politiques de développement international. J'ai notamment pour ambition de me perfectionner sur les questions liées à la gestion et à la protection des réfugiés dans le monde, et particulièrement en Europe. À travers mon travail d'analyste politique à EU-Logos Athéna, je souhaite apporter un éclairage sur les actions que l'Union Européenne et ses États membres mènent dans le domaine de la migration et de l'asile.

Laisser un commentaire

Fermer le menu