Prosecuting criminal offences against European Union’s financial interests: why setting up the European Public Prosecutor’s Office?

Prosecuting criminal offences against European Union’s financial interests: why setting up the European Public Prosecutor’s Office?

[VERSION FRANCAISE PLUS BAS – FRENCH VERSION BELOW]

Financial crimes are not usually the ones linked with serious criminality in people’s mind, but they are nevertheless really harming European societies all the same. Corruption, money laundering, value added tax (VAT) and tax frauds threaten the integrity of EU and States budget. The losses are difficult to estimate due to the obvious lack of data on these actions, taking place in the hidden side of the free market, but several attempts to do so revealed that they represent billions of euro each year. EU is struggling to combat these offences. Institutional bodies fighting financial crimes exist, but they suffer from their heaviness, their slowness and, consequently, their lack of efficiency. Furthermore, their multiplication leads to bad communication between them, and even mistrust in certain relationships. These flaws are part of the decision to create the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO), whose activities started this year. However, they produced results through the years, and one could say that they should be improved before setting up a new body. But the EPPO is innovative on a particularly important point: it is the first European institution endorsing power to prosecute on criminal basis, whereas the other organs, with results or not, are mostly cooperation tools and, for the European Anti-Fraud Office, an administration prosecution tool.

The importance of financial crimes

The offences against the EU budget which will be fought by the EPPO are defined in Articles 3 and 4 of Directive (EU) 2017/1371[1] on the fight against fraud to the Union’s financial interests by means of criminal law, also called PIF Directive. The deadline for transposition of the PIF Directive into national law expired on 6 July 2019, but, despite the importance of the prosecution of these crimes for national public finances, only twelve Member States had notified full transposition by that date. Fortunately, almost all Member States had communicated complete transposition, or at least partial transposition, by June 2020.[2] The Directive split the offences between fraud in Article 3 and other criminal offences in Article 4.

One of the issues concerning tax fraud is that existing rules are often unable to keep up with the increasing speed of the economy and ensure that all market participants pay their fair share of taxes, since current international and national tax rules were mostly conceived in the early 20th century. According to the European Parliament, there is an urgent and continuous need for reform of the rules, so that international, EU and national tax systems are fit for the new economic, social and technological challenges of the 21st century.[3]

            Several assessments have attempted to quantify the magnitude of losses from tax fraud, tax evasion and aggressive tax planning, but none of these provide a large enough picture on their own, due to the nature of the data, since the objective of fraud is to stay hidden, or their lack. Indeed, some Member States avoid preparing their own national tax gap estimates and, in addition, methodologies are not harmonised. In some cases, they are different but complementary, but it mostly shows their fragmentation and incompatibility. Therefore, there is a lack of reliable and unbiased statistics on the magnitude of tax avoidance and tax evasion. Under Article 325 of the Treaty on the functioning of the European Union, Member States are required to take EU fraud as seriously as fraud against their own budgets and are required to coordinate their action aimed at protecting the financial interests of the Union against fraud and to organise with the help of the European Commission, close and regular cooperation between the competent departments of their administrations. However, this co-operation was seriously weakened from the start, due to the differences in defining frauds and reporting them to the Brussels authorities.[4] But the implementation of the PIF Directive and the creation of the EPPO should harmonise practices, methodologies and so definitions and reports.

Value-added tax (VAT) fraud

Substantial losses are coming from VAT fraud, while VAT is an important source of tax revenue for national budgets. In 2016, VAT revenues in the EU-28 Member States amounted to EUR 1 044 billion, which corresponds to 18 % of all tax revenues in the Member States. In comparison, the 2017 annual EU budget amounted EUR 157 billion. However, every year, large amounts of the expected VAT revenue are lost because of fraud. The losses are estimated by calculating the VAT Gap, which represents the difference between the expected VAT revenue and the one collected. The loss is not due only to fraud, but also to bankruptcy, miscalculations and avoidance.[5] In 2009, the European Commission had estimated the EU VAT gap at an amount between EUR 90 and 113 billion for the period 2000-2006. In 2017, the total amount of EU VAT lost in 2015 was estimated at EUR 151.5 billion, which represents a loss of 12% of the total expected VAT revenue and a significant increase over a 10-year period. According to the 2018 report on the VAT gap (released on 11 September 2018),[6] the VAT gap for the year 2016 fell below EUR 150 billion and amounted to EUR 147.1 billion.

The Commission estimates that around EUR 50 billion is lost to cross-border VAT fraud while Europol estimates that around EUR 60 billion of VAT fraud is linked to organised crime and terrorism financing. One thing is certain: the economic impact of the VAT gap remains extremely significant. It would represent approximately 1.5 % of Member States’ GDP and could reach levels up to 10 % of VAT receipts in some Member States. It should be remembered that the VAT gap affects not only the Member States but also the EU, since a uniform rate of 0.3 % is levied on the harmonised VAT base of each Member State as one of the EU’s own resources. It should also be stressed that VAT fraud also affects compliant businesses because fraudsters create competition distortions in the market.[7]

Tax evasion

Tax evasion is another pressing issue for the European Union and the Member States, and it must be addressed for various reasons. At first, it prevents States from implementing social, economic, environmental, cultural and other policies by depriving them from raising sufficient revenues. Tax evasion is a threat to the credibility of democratic institutions since it undermines the efforts of the government to promote welfare and social cohesion, and it prevents it from performing its social function, while injuring the trust of citizens in the means of a legitimate, democratic government. Secondly, by avoiding their citizen’s duties and responsibilities, tax evaders put a greater burden on those who eventually pay off the effective costs of taxation, who are, in their majority, members of the lower and middle parts of the income distribution. Also, it encourages financial institutions, authorities or politicians to engage in corrupt activities for their own enrichment or other benefits, who are generally interested in increasing their profits even if it implies circumventing the existing rules.[8]

The reports and analysis currently available suggest that the EU tax gap resulting from largely domestic tax evasion might be €825 billion a year, based on data for 2015. It is harder to estimate corporate tax avoidance in the EU, but available evidence suggests different amounts, from €50bn a year to €190bn a year according to previous European Parliament studies.[9] Half of all EU Member States have tax gaps that might exceed their healthcare spending, and often by considerable amounts. As a result, it is suggested that there remains considerable capacity within many EU Member States to collect considerably more of the tax that is legally owing than is done at present.[10]

Money laundering

Money laundering is a criminal offence by itself, but it is a very vast and complex topic since it is the result of a concentration of criminal activities. It can have its origin in various illicit activities, such as corruption, arms and human trafficking, drug dealing, tax evasion and fraud, and can be used to finance terrorism, and it may occur in a variety of ways, such as with the shrewd exploitation of a complex, interweaving web of secrecy jurisdictions and/or tax havens, “shell companies”, the abuse of loopholes in existing anti-money laundering legislation, etc.[11] Because of inadequate disclosure rules, it is far too easy to make use of a company or legal arrangements such as trusts in the EU, to conceal one’s identity for the purposes of money laundering.

According to European Parliament Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance of 26 March 2019,[12] the proceeds from criminal activity in the EU are estimated to amount to EUR 110 billion per year, corresponding to 1 % of the Union’s total GDP. In some Member States, up to 70 % of money laundering cases have a cross-border dimension, and the scale of money laundering is estimated by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to be the equivalent of between 2 to 5 % of global GDP, or around EUR 715 billion and 1,87 trillion a year.

All the European anti-money laundering legal framework is based on the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) Recommendations, transposed into the successive directives countering this crime. These Recommendations are the corner stone of the international framework for combatting money laundering and terrorist financing. They have been endorsed by over 180 countries and are universally recognised as setting out the international standards. They have been revised from time to time, and implemented in EU through the various Anti-Money Laundering (AML) Directives, which extended the tools of anti-money laundering and the criminal offences which could be linked to it, such as terrorism. The EU anti-money laundering Directive 91/308/EC (AMLD1) implemented the Financial Action Task Force[13] (FATF) Recommendations on 10 June 1991 within the competences of the EC Treaty which did not provide for criminalisation.[14] The Fifth Anti-Money-Laundering Directive (AMLD 5)[15], the last one, published on the 19 June 2018,complements the existing EU framework for combating money laundering and terrorist financing.[16] It is supposed to increase transparency, facilitate the work of financial intelligence units, set up centralised bank account registers to identify holders, and address risks linked to virtual currencies and anonymous prepaid cards.[17] However, according to Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance, some Member States have failed to fully or partially transpose AMLD4, and they also have to transpose AMLD5 before 2020.

Corruption

Obviously, corruption is difficult to measure, but according to the Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering (CRIM)[18], the problem is real and extensive. Its impacts are felt by EU citizens. According to the Transparency International Global Corruption Barometer, 53% of European citizens rated their government as doing a bad job at fighting corruption.[19] Furthermore, according to the Eurobarometer, “despite an 8 point decrease since 2013, over two thirds (68%) of respondents still think that corruption is widespread within their own country. Across the EU, over half of respondents think corruption is widespread among political parties (56%) and among politicians at national, regional or local levels (53%). A quarter of Europeans (25%) say that they are personally affected by corruption in their daily lives, although only about one in ten Europeans say they know someone who has taken or takes bribes (12%), but there are variations at country level.[20]  These cases are actual but underestimated experiences of corruption and, therefore, should be considered as the minimum level of corruption existing.

Corruption is estimated by the European Commission to cost around 120 billion euros per year, or one percent of the GDP, and the public sector is one of the most sensitive to corruption. According to Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) estimates, money drained through corruption amounts between 20 per cent and 25 per cent of the procurement budget, that is around US$2 trillion annually. There is no safe way to measure the effects of corruption on EU financial interests from the data on petty corruption experiences. By their nature, they cannot cover areas like procurement and management of EU programs and projects, which can be influenced by medium and large-scale corruption. However, according to the CRIM, “when there are at least 20 million cases of petty corruption in the public sectors in the EU, it is obvious that the phenomenon also has a spill over effect in the parts of the public administration of the Member States (and the corresponding political figures), that have the responsibility of the management of EU funds and other financial interests.”[21]

It is not just about a loss of money, it has an impact on society as a whole, in all its aspects.[22] It distorts competition and reduces the quality, sustainability and safety of public projects. From a financial point of view, it makes the costs escalate for a service with poor quality, without benefiting the country’s economic development. It also has significative impact on health, safety and environment. By failing to meet proper environmental standards, it causes irresponsible use of natural resources and increases health and safety risks. The prevention and fight against corruption will be subject to regular monitoring and assessment of Member States legal framework under the newly established rule of law mechanism. The rule of law is enshrined in Article 2 of the Treaty on European Union as one of the common values for all Member States. Under the rule of law, all public powers always act within the constraints set out by law, in accordance with the values of democracy and fundamental rights, and under the control of independent and impartial courts. Ensuring respect for the rule of law is a primary responsibility of each Member State, but the Union has a shared stake and a role to play in resolving rule of law issues wherever they appear. In the last decade, the EU has developed and tested several instruments to help enforce the rule of law. Indeed, severe rule of law challenges in some Member States triggered debates at EU and national level on how to strengthen the EU’s ability to address such situations. In its Communication of July 2019, the Commission proposed that the EU and its Member States should increase efforts to promote a robust political and legal culture supporting the rule of law and should develop instruments preventing rule of law problems from emerging or deepening.[23]

This idea took shape with the creation of the European Rule of Law Mechanism, which is designed as a yearly cycle to promote the rule of law and to prevent problems from emerging or deepening. It focuses on improving understanding and awareness of issues and significant developments in areas with a direct bearing on the respect for the rule of law – justice system, anti-corruption framework, media pluralism and freedom, and other institutional issues linked to checks and balances.[24] In the context of the European semester of economic governance, the challenges in the fight against corruption are assessed with a particular focus on areas of risk, such as public procurement, public administration, the business environment and healthcare.[25]

The defence of EU’s financial interests

The European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF, stands for Office européen de lutte anti-fraude)

The roots of OLAF can be found in the Task Force “Anti-Fraud Coordination Unit” (UCLAF), which was created in 1988 as part of the Secretariat-General of the European Commission. It worked alongside national anti-fraud departments and provided the coordination and assistance needed to tackle transnational organised fraud. But after it was severely criticised by the European Court of Auditors for the quality of its operational and intelligence work, the European Parliament called for the creation of an independent anti-fraud office.[26] It resulted in the establishment, by the Decision 1999/352,[27] of the European Anti-Fraud Office with an independent investigative mandate. It also had the right to lead internal investigations within EU institutions.

Through the years, its operations have been strengthened by diverse programmes, such as the successive Hercule Programmes, or the launch of the web-based tool Fraud Notification System.[28] Significant changes were brought on 1 October 2013, when the Regulation 883/2013[29] on investigations by OLAF entered into force. It further defines the rights of persons concerned, introduces an annual exchange of views between OLAF and the EU institutions and requires that each Member State designate an anti-fraud coordination service.

OLAF has two major responsibilities. First, it is responsible for conducting internal investigations within the institutions and other bodies of the EU, which have the obligation to fully cooperate in OLAF enquiries and to communicate to OLAF any information concerning suspected fraud and irregularity. Second, OLAF also has the responsibility to assist Member States’ agencies in their fraud and irregularity investigations, both in terms of investigation, intelligence and helping to liaise between different national agencies.

Europol

Europol finds its roots within the Maastricht treaty.[30] It was first de facto organised in 1993 as the Europol Drug Unit (EDU) and officially established in 1995 by the “Europol” Convention, which came into force on 1 October 1998. The Convention defines the police cooperation unit as a dual structure, with a service on the one hand, to analyse and produce databases (a service composed of persons directly engaged by Europol) and, on the other hand, a liaison officer service in charge of facilitating bilateral and / or multilateral cooperation between Member States.[31] Europol was fully integrated into the EU with Council Decision 2009/371/JHA of 6 April 2009 (OJ L121, 15.5.2009) in order to ‘support and strengthen action by Member States and their mutual cooperation in preventing and combating organised crime, terrorism and other forms of serious crime affecting two or more Member States.’ Europol also works with some non-EU partner states and international organisations.

In a nutshell, Europol aims at the simplification of the exchanges of information between law enforcement agencies (customs, intelligence, border guards, etc.). It has set up a specific network that focuses on missing trader intra-community (MTIC) fraud (third countries such as Norway and Switzerland are also part of it). Since 2017, Europol has developed joint investigation teams, which can be seen as a ‘cooperation tool amongst national investigative agencies when tackling cross-border crime. They facilitate the coordination of investigations and prosecutions conducted in parallel across several States.’[32]

Eurojust

On 14 December 2000, on the initiative of Portugal, France, Sweden and Belgium, a provisional judicial cooperation unit was formed under the name Pro-Eurojust, operating from the Council building in Brussels. The idea came from discussion on the establishment of a judicial cooperation unit at a European Council Meeting in Tampere, Finland, on 15 and 16 October 1999. With the attacks of 9/11 in the USA, the focus on the fight against terrorism moved from the regional/national sphere to its widest international context and served as a catalyst for the formalisation, by Council Decision 2002/187/JHA of 28 February 2002 (OJ L 63, 6.3.2002), of the establishment of Eurojust as a judicial coordination unit. Since 2002, Eurojust has grown tremendously and so have its operational tasks and involvement in European judicial cooperation. More powers and a revised set of rules became necessary. The Lisbon Treaty contained an important chapter in the development of Eurojust in its Article 85, which mentions Eurojust and defines its mission, 

“to support and strengthen coordination and cooperation between national investigating and prosecuting authorities in relation to serious crime affecting two or more Member States […].”

Eurojust works is based on operations conducted and information supplied by the Member States and by Europol. After extensive negotiations since July 2013, the European Parliament and the Council adopted the Regulation on the European Union Agency for Criminal Justice Cooperation in November 2018 [Regulation (EU) 2018/1727 of 14 November 2018, OJ L 295, 21.11.2018]. The Regulation establishes a new governance system, clarifies the relationship between Eurojust and the European Public Prosecutor’s Office, prescribes a new data protection regime, adopts new rules for Eurojust’s external relations and strengthens the role of the European and national Parliaments in the democratic oversight of Eurojust’s activities.[33]

European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO)

The idea of the EPPO is not new: it is mentioned as early as 1996 by the President of the European Parliament and few judges because of the shortcomings of international mutual legal assistance, but its creation will wait years.

The book Corpus Juris, ordered by the Commission in 1997 and directed by M. Delmas-Marty is a turning point by proposing for the first time to create a specialized European Public Prosecutor’s Office composed of a European Prosecutor General and European Delegate Prosecutors in the Member States. A Green Paper on criminal-law protection of the financial interests of the Community and the establishment of a European Prosecutor is published in 2001[34], affirming the EU’s will to create EPPO which will be laid down in the Nice (2001) and Lisbon (2007) treaties. It is only in 2013 that the Commission officially presents a proposal of Council Regulation on creation of EPPO, but debates are blocked by firm opposition of some States as the Netherlands, Sweden, Poland or Hungary. Finally, 16 Member States which really want creation of EPPO decided to start the project under enhanced cooperation by Council Regulation 2017/1939.[35] They are now 22,[36] but unlike the Netherlands, which joins the cooperation in 2018, Hungary, Denmark, Ireland, Poland and Sweden still refuse. However, they could participate whenever they wish in the future.[37]

It seems that the choice to join or not the European Public Prosecutor’s office is more a question of political affiliation than national priorities.[38]

Studying the arguments against the EPPO

Institutional and judicial motives: the efficiency of the pre-existing institutions

Some European deputies argued that anti-fraud European institutions already exist, and they should be improved and not replaced or completed by another one. On the other hand, some others were convinced that EPPO could resolve the problems persisting between these institutions.[39] According to OLAF[40], only 39% of the files it transmitted to the national judicial authorities gave rise to indictments, and despite the great progress of Eurojust, the unit is considered as insufficient and way too slow.[41]

The existing institutions faced major issues of encroachment on their respective competences, encroachment which leads to logics of rivalry, distrust and even mistrust. This is the case between OLAF and Eurojust, especially in terms of organised criminality. These instruments are built on opposite institutional principles, as Eurojust deals with cases falling within the third pillar, whereas OLAF has competence over misappropriation of Community funds, which falls within the first pillar. It could seem that they shall never cross each other path, but, in practice, the distinction is not so clear. It is the same problem between Europol and Eurojust. They are supposed to cooperate with each other, but they act more as rivals than partners. This rivalry is based on encroachment of their competences, but also on the fact that institutionalisation of European security is still in progress. They are not so old instruments, and their powers are changing on a regular basis, so as their relationship and cooperation.[42]

Uncertainty concerning EPPO comes from a risk of encroachment between it and the other instruments, just like it happened before its creation. Indeed, according to Directive (EU) 2017/1371, the EPPO will be competent for prosecuting fraud, corruption, money laundering and misappropriation. But according to Council Decision 2002/187/JHA of 28 February 2002, setting up Eurojust with a view to reinforcing the fight against serious crime established Eurojust as a “body of the Union” with legal personality, Eurojust’s general competence covers, among others, fraud and corruption and any criminal offence affecting the European Community’s financial interests and the laundering of the proceeds of crime.[43]The Regulation (EU, Euratom) 883/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 September 2013 confirms that the mandate of OLAF extends beyond the protection of financial interests to include all activities relating to safeguarding EU interests against irregular conduct liable to result in administrative or criminal proceedings. Even if it is not part of its priorities, organised fraud is also considered as one of the biggest security threats for Europol. All these instruments are supposed to cooperate, even more because they defend the same interests, but they do not have the same level of independence, they do not answer to the same EU institutions and they use different tools and approaches to fight against fraud and corruption. EPPO may be another body leading to fragmentating of European judiciary system, reducing the global effectivity of instruments.

However, the creation of EPPO could also lead to harmonising practices of these institutions. Since EPPO is the only instruments with prosecution power, and Europol, Eurojust and OLAF are instruments of research and cooperation, but which suffer from a lack of confidence from the national authorities, EPPO could be the link with national police forces. It could gather information from all the other institutions, and it would be easier for them to cooperate. Concerning the risk of encroachment, the Regulation (EU) 2018/1727 clarifies and defines the competence of Eurojust in light of the establishment of the EPPO. It states that:

“from the date on which the EPPO assumes its tasks, Eurojust should be able to exercise its competence in cases which concern crimes for which the EPPO is competent, where those crimes involve both Member States which participate in enhanced cooperation on the establishment of the EPPO and Member States which do not participate in such enhanced cooperation. In such cases, Eurojust should act at the request of the non-participating Member States or at the request of the EPPO. Eurojust should in any case remain competent for offences affecting the financial interests of the Union whenever the EPPO is not competent or where, although the EPPO is competent, it does not exercise its competence.”[44]

Regulation also recommends reducing the administrative workload of national members in order to strengthen its operational functions. In the same idea, Europol should focus on gathering information for the other institutions and OLAF should still manage administrative investigations. Finally, Directive (EU) 2017/1371 harmonises definitions of criminal offences against the EU budget for Member States participating in the enhanced cooperation. Member States are supposed to fight EU fraud as seriously as against their own budget, and, in this purpose, cooperate with each other and share information. This was really difficult due to the differences in defining frauds and reporting them to OLAF, but the EPPO should be a solution to the fragmentation of criminal offences definition.

Economical motives: costs and gains

The cost of another judicial institution is at the heart of the concerns of Member States. The EPPO represents more expenditures, whereas already existing instruments could be improved before creating new ones. A cost / benefit calculation should be performed to analyse this argument, after examining the EU budget (see Figure below).

The EU budget finances activities ranging from developing rural areas and conserving the environment to protecting external borders and promoting human rights. It is decided jointly by the Commission, the Council and the Parliament. The Commission submits a draft to the Council and Parliament for their consideration. They can make changes; if they disagree, they have to work out a compromise. But it is the Commission that is responsible for spending. The EU countries and the Commission share responsibility for about 80% of the budget. Each year’s budget sets out the amounts agreed in advance according to a plan known as the multiannual financial framework. This enables the EU to plan its funding programmes effectively for several years in advance. The current framework runs from 2021 to 2027.[45]

EU benefits from EUR 153,6 billion in 2020[46], and the instruments studied can be found under the budget for the European Commission. Europol is listed under ‘Internal Security’. The EPPO and Eurojust are listed under ‘Justice’. OLAF is listed under ‘Administrative Expenditure of the ‘Fight against Fraud’ policy area. According to the 2020 European Commission budget, it benefits from 151,89 million, or 0,98% of the EU general budget. The 2019 administrative budget of OLAF is EUR 59,72 million, Eurojust’s budget is around EUR 37,67 million and Europol’s is about EUR 137,14 million,[47] for a total of approximately EUR 234,53 million. Budgeting in the EPPO follows the general lines applicable to the institutions and bodies of the EU, reiterated in article 91 EPPO Regulation. The budget granted to EPPO in the 2019 Draft General Budget is EUR 4.9 million. In a Letter of Amendment to the Draft General Budget for 2019, the Commission proposed the recruitment of two additional prosecutors to consider the unforeseen participation of Malta and the Netherlands in the EPPO. However, the number of the EPPO staff remains unchanged, due to expectations of a low caseload in the newly participating Member States.[48]

Figure : 2019 European Commission budget

Source: Budget of European Commission, 2019-2020. Online: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/budget/data/DB/2020/en/SEC03.pdf

While costs concerning issues such as staffing and infrastructure can perhaps be estimated with some accuracy, it is the broader costs and benefits in terms of the financial impact of fraud that cause difficulties. Yet it is only by evaluating financial losses due to fraud that the ultimate effectiveness of any such measure can be assessed.[49] But if the costs and benefits are compared quickly and in absolute, since the EU tax gap resulting from largely domestic tax evasion might be €825 billion a year just by itself, the cost of setting up the EPPO is not so high. 

Political motives: between trust and sovereignty

These  motives are not directly linked, but they counterbalance each other since when opponents are waving the classical threat-to-sovereignty flag, defendants emphasised on the gain of trust from EU citizen. Two visions of Europe clash in this argument: the EU of people versus the EU of states.

The debate about whether states are always sovereign if they submit to international law is not new, and the project of EPPO is one of the illustrations of its actuality. However, it should be noted that since this project takes place in the EU, the question of sovereignty toward international law is not exactly relevant. Indeed, everyone agrees on the specificity of EU as an international legal order. International law has few law-making organs of its own, hence it depends on state for law-making but also for enforcement of the law. As a result, sovereign States function not only as individual contracting parties as in contract-like treaties, but also as lawmakers in the inter­national legal order. The role of sovereign states as law makers has important normative consequences. Their role as officials makes them responsible and constrains their international law making competence. They are doubly constrained and hence accountable, internally but also externally through international law rules.[50] Since EU is the most successful union of independent states in the world, both economically and politically, with its own law-making process, international law theories do not apply. But because of this deep cooperation between states, the question of the reality of their sovereignty within EU stays an important source of debates and conflicts.

European Union relies on treaties ratified by States, and hence exists only because they agreed on it. The Permanent court of international justice declined to see in the conclusion of any Treaty by which a State undertakes to perform or refrain from performing a particular act an abandonment of its sovereignty, since “the right of entering into international engagements is an attribute of State sovereignty.”[51] However, the EU is autonomous enough to act on the Member States. From the beginning, it constitutes an original organization, which tends to broaden its competences beyond the initial economic sphere through the spill over effect.[52] Treaties and jurisprudence allow inclusion of new areas in the European field. As an example, the European Parliament was considered as early as in the Lisbon treaty, and hence according to some politicians, the institution of this new body only follows the logical development of EU.

The impact of EU on state sovereignty in a material sense can be seen at different levels. First, concerning state competences, those transferred to the EU cover a field more and more broad, even some competences traditionally considered as sovereign powers of the state as money, taxes, justice, defence. States lost their decision power and are deprived from their right to oppose application of EU law on their territory. This can also be seen as a breach of States’ territorial sovereignty, but it is more a mutation than an erasure. Secondly, concerning citizenship, states have to deal with European citizen as they would do with their own nationals. European citizenship in only of superposition, but it has been recognized that its status is fundamental for the nationals of Member States. Status and rights of foreigners from the EU are also managed by it, since visa, asylum and migration policies are decided within the EU.[53] This erosion of states’ attributes casts doubt on the reality of state sovereignty because of European integration. However, the status of sovereign state is necessary to be a member of the EU, and as we will see, sovereignty is preserved from and even protected by European integration.

Indeed, States still own the competence of the competence, as the masters of treaties and they have the right to quit unilaterally. Furthermore, there is no competing sovereignty from EU which is not a state. This is clearly stated in the Article 4§2 of the Treaty on European Union, according to which:

“The Union shall respect the equality of Member States before the Treaties as well as their national identities, inherent in their fundamental structures, political and constitutional, inclusive of regional and local self-government. It shall respect their essential State functions, including ensuring the territorial integrity of the State, maintaining law and order and safeguarding national security. In particular, national security remains the sole responsibility of each Member State.”[54]

Transferred competences to the EU are not given up by States, they are exercised on an alternative mode. States are not deprived from their competences; they are deprived from the right to exercise them alone. However, the transition from the solitary exercise of state powers to their pooling and management within an integrated legal and political area is not necessarily detrimental to the preservation of state sovereignty. In this current globalised world, states cannot hope to have an impact on facts they want to regulate without collective decision making. This is typically the issues discussed for the EPPO, all offences possessing a transnational character, as developed above. Efficiency of States sovereignty is linked to their capacity to ally to face transnational issues, so they can weight on international community to defend their interest. Some authors developed the German concept of “open statehood” (offene Staatlichkeit), according to which ensuring state missions relies on  States’ capacity to take concrete decisions, so exercising some competences at the supranational level would be the only way to preserve their statehood.[55] 

            Some states felt their identity threatened by the EU legal integration through the primacy principle. After judgments by the national constitutional courts using the principle of constitutional identity, primary law has incorporated this concern for the preservation of their singularity in the Maastricht treaty. This provision is now included in the Article 4 § 2 TUE, quoted above, which specifies the contours of this « national identity » to which the European Union owes the respect and the Court has taken into account this provision in order to interpret, in a more favourable sense to the States, the derogations to freedoms of movement based on grounds relating to the cultural or constitutional identity of the States.[56] Therefore, even if criminal law is not a part of constitutional identity, it could surely be protected by states under the national identity if they feel that EU was seeking to take over this competence, which is not the case. As already said, the EPPO has been created through enhanced cooperation. Firstly, it means they chose individually to be part of the project and accepted criminal rules only on the financial field by adopting the so-called directive PIF, which unifies previously confusing definitions. Secondly, States are not deprived from their national criminal law since the criminals will be judged in their country or the country of the commission of the offence, by national courts.

The implication of national courts should also be a solution to the lack of trust from both national authorities and European citizens. Indeed, one of the problems existing in the bodies such as OLAF, Europol and Eurojust is linked to the lack of trust from national authorities towards European bodies. First, within the European instruments, national prosecutors and liaison officers are not part of a logic of empowerment vis-à-vis national level. Furthermore, uncertainties due to organisational constraints and the lack of knowledge in European dynamics result in little exchanges between national and European level and even, in the end, in the feeling of loss of power and authority.[57] With the EPPO, national authorities will be completely involved in the prosecution process. The prosecutors appointed, even if independent, will be selected for the knowledge of their own criminal system, and will coordinate the prosecution with the help of the national police forces.

Concerning the trust of the citizen towards EU, one of the most recent inquiries is the Eurobarometer ordered by the European Commission, published in 2016.[58] First of all, the inquiry shows that citizens are now more likely to trust their national political institutions, following a previous decline. According to this survey, French people are clearly the most suspicious of their national institutions, whereas Dutch people mostly tend to trust them. Hungarian people tend more not to trust than to trust, but they still have better rate than French people. One can imagine that a more efficient prosecution of financial crimes could increase the trust of European people in their institutions. Indeed, in France for example, the trust has been eroded by the revelation of financial scandals in the highest spheres of State.

Furthermore, though still the minority view, trust in the European Union has begun to rise again. However, it remains significantly below the best score recorded over the last five years: 40% in spring 2015. The ratio of trust to distrust has improved slightly, while remaining unfavourable, in both the non-euro area (39% versus 50%, compared with 37% versus 51% in spring 2016) and the euro area countries (34% versus 56%, compared with 32% versus 56%). A majority of respondents trust the EU in 11 Member States, compared with nine in spring 2016. Respondents predominantly distrust the EU in 17 Member States, with scores of 50% or more in Greece (78%), the Czech Republic (66%), France (65%), Cyprus (63%), Austria (58%), Italy (58%), Slovenia (57%), the United Kingdom (56%), Spain (54%), Germany (53%), the Netherlands (51%), Hungary (50%) and Croatia (50%).[59] By bringing good results in the prosecution of offences against the EU budget, the EPPO could increase confidence in the European institutions. Indeed, all the money lost in these affairs could finance more projects which citizen will really benefit from.


[1] Directive (EU) 2017/1371 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 July 2017 on the fight against fraud to the Union’s financial interests by means of criminal law, OJ L 198, 28.7.2017, p. 29–41 

[2] European Commission, 31st Annual Report on the protection of the European Union’s financial interests — Fight against fraud – 2019, 3.9.2020, p. 9.

Available online : https://ec.europa.eu/anti-fraud/sites/antifraud/files/pif_report_2019_en.pdf

[3] European Parliament, Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (2018/2121(INI)), P8_ TA-PROV (2019)0240, 26 March 2019, p.6.

[4] Quirke Brendan, “EU Fraud : institutional and legal competence”, Crime, Law and Social Change, Vol. 51, Issue 5, 2009, pp. 531-535.

[5] European Parliament, Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (2018/2121(INI)), P8_ TA-PROV (2019)0240, 26 March 2019, pp. 9-21.

[6] Center for Social and Economic Research & Institute for Advances Studies (for the European Commission, DG TAXUD), Study and Reports on the VAT Gap in the EU-28 Member States: 2018 Final Report, TAXUD/2015/CC/131.

[7] Lamensch M. and Ceci, E., VAT fraud: Economic impact, challenges and policy issues, European Parliament, Directorate-General for Internal Policies, Policy Department A – Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies, 15 October 2018, pp. 10-13.

[8] Rui Tavares, “Relationship between Money Laundering, Tax Evasion and Tax Havens”, Thematic Paper on Money Laundering, Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering (CRIM) 2012-2013, January 2013, p. 3.

[9] European Parliament, Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (2018/2121(INI)), P8_ TA-PROV(2019)0240, 26 March 2019.

[10] Richard Murphy, The European Tax Gap, Report for the Socialists and Democrats Group in the European Parliament, January 2019, pp. 1-2.

[11] Rui Tavares, “Relationship between Money Laundering, Tax Evasion and Tax Havens”, op. cit. pp. 2-3.

[12] European Parliament, Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (2018/2121(INI)), P8_ TA-PROV (2019)0240, 26 March 2019, pp. 37-43.

[13] The FATF was set up in 1989 by the G-7 States inviting a number of other states such as Switzerland, Austria and the Benelux states, which laid down a set of international standards for anti-money laundering.

[14] Mario Borghezio, “Money Laundering, banks and finance”, Thematic Paper on Money Laundering, Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering (CRIM) 2012-2013, January 2013.

[15] Directive (EU) 2018/843 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2018 amending Directive (EU) 2015/849 on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the purposes of money laundering or terrorist financing, OJ L 156, 19.6.2018, p. 43–74.

[16] Directive (EU) 2018/843 of the European Parliament and of the Council, 30 May 2018, OJEU L 156, 19.6.2018

[17] Beatrix Immenkamp, Gianluca Sgueo and Sofija Voronova with Alina Dobreva, “The fight against terrorism”, Briefing of the EPRS, European Parliament, June 2019, p.6.

[18] Skylakakis, “Areas of systemic corruption in the public administration of the Member States and measures in order to counter its negative effect for the EU”, Thematic Paper on Corruption, Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering (CRIM) 2012-2013, November 2012.

[19] Transparency International, “People and Corruption : Citizens’ voices from around the world”, Global Corruption Barometer, November 2017, p. 4.

[20] Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs and co-ordinated by the Directorate-General for Communication, Special Eurobarometer 470 : Corruption, Survey requested by the European Commission, December 2017, p.5.

[21] Skylakakis, “Areas of systemic corruption in the public administration of the Member States and measures in order to counter its negative effect for the EU”, op. cit. pp. 1-2.

[22] Susanne Kühn and Laura B. Sherman, Curbing corruption in public procurement – A practical guide, Transparency International, 2014.

[23] COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS,  2020 Rule of Law Report The rule of law situation in the European Union, Brussels, 30.9.2020

COM (2020) 580 final.

[24] Idem.

[25] European Commission, 31st Annual Report on the protection of the European Union’s financial interests — Fight against fraud – 2019, COM (2020) 363, 3.9.2020, p. 7.

[26] Brendan Quirke, “OLAF’s role in the fight against fraud in the European Union : do too many cooks spoil the broth?”, Crime, Law and Social Change, Volume 53, Issue 1, February 2010, pp 97–98.

[27]  Commission Decision of 28 April 1999 – OJ L 136,31.5.1999

[28] European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF), History : https://ec.europa.eu/anti-fraud/about-us/history_en  

[29] Regulation (EU, Euratom ) No 883/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 September 2013 concerning investigations conducted by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF), OJ L 248 18.9.2013, p. 1. 

[30] Treaty on European Union, signed at Maastricht on 7 February 1992, Article K.1.

[31] Amandine Scherrer, Antoine Mégie, et Valsamis Mitsilegas. « La stratégie de l’Union européenne contre la criminalité organisée : entre lacunes et inquiétudes », Cultures & Conflits, vol. 74, no. 2, 2009, pp. 103-104.

[32] M. Lamensch and, E. Ceci, VAT fraud: Economic impact, challenges and policy issues, European Parliament, Directorate-General for Internal Policies, Policy Department A – Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies, 15 October 2018, pp 35-36. Available : http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2018/626076/IPOL_STU(2018)626076_EN.pdf

[33] Eurojust : http://eurojust.europa.eu/Pages/home.aspx

[34] COM (2001) 715, 11 December 2001

[35] Council Regulation (EU) 2017/1939 of 12 October 2017 implementing enhanced cooperation on the establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (‘the EPPO’), OJ L 283, 31.10.2017, p. 1–71.

[36] Current participating States : Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italia, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Slovenia.

[37] Toute l’Europe, « Qu’est-ce que le parquet européen ? », 18 March 2019. URL : https://www.touteleurope.eu/actualite/qu-est-ce-que-le-parquet-europeen.html  

[38] European Parliament, debates, plenary session of 28 April 2015 (CRE 28/04/2015-12, adopted text : P8_TA(2015)0173) ; plenary session of 4 October 2016 (CRE 04/10/2016-17, P8_TA(2016)0376) ; plenary session of 4 October 2017 (CRE 04/10/2017-17, P8_TA(2017)0384).

[39] European Parliament, debates, already referred to.

[40] OLAF, The OLAF report 2019 : Twentieth report of the European Anti-Fraud Office, 1 January to 31 December 2019, 2020, p. 40.

[41] Jean-Baptiste Jacquin, « Tentative de sauvetage du procureur européen », Le Monde, 7 décembre 2016.

[42] Amandine Scherrer, Antoine Mégie, et Valsamis Mitsilegas. « La stratégie de l’Union européenne contre la criminalité organisée : entre lacunes et inquiétudes », Cultures & Conflits, vol. 74, no. 2, 2009, pp. 105-110.

[43] Council Decision 2002/187/JHA of 28 February 2002, Article 4 – OJ L 63, 6.3.2002

[44] Regulation (EU) 2018/1727 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 November 2018 on the European Union Agency for Criminal Justice Cooperation (Eurojust), and replacing and repealing Council Decision 2002/187/JHA, OJ L 295, 21.11.2018, p. 138–183, (8).

[45] Europa, EU Budget, “How the EU budget is spent”. Online: https://europa.eu/european-union/about-eu/eu-budget/expenditure_en

[46] EUR-LEX, budget, “Total revenue”, 2020. Online : https://eur-lex.europa.eu/budget/www/index-en.htm

[47]l’OLAF Report 2017; Statement of revenue and expenditure of Eurojust for the financial year 2017 – amending budget No 1 (2018/C 279/03); Statement of revenue and expenditure of the European Police Office for the financial year 2017 — amending budget No 1 (2017/C 415/06).

[48] Hartmut Aden, Maria-Luisa Sanchez-Barrueco, Paul Stephenson, European Parliament, Directorate General for Internal Policies, Policy Department D: Budgetary Affairs, The European Public Prosecutor’s Office: Strategies for coping with complexity (IP/D/CONT/IC/2018-113), 15 May 2019, pp. 43-48.

[49] Alison Davies, European Parliament, Briefing: Impact Assessment for a Commission Proposal for a Council Regulation on the Establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (COM (2013) 534 final)., 2013, pp. 1-10.

[50] Samantha Besson, “Sovereignty, International Law and Democracy”, The European Journal of International Law (EJIL), Vol. 22, n°2, 2011, pp. 385-387.

[51] Permanent Court of International Justice, 17 August 1923, SS Wimbledon (France v. Germany), Series A, n°1.

[52] Gaëlle Marti, « Ce que l’Union européenne fait à l’État. Recherches sur l’incidence de l’appartenance à l’Union européenne sur les États-nations », Civitas Europa, vol. 38, no. 1, 2017, pp. 319-322.

[53] Gaëlle Marti, op. cit., pp. 322-326.

[54] Treaty on European Union, consolidated version of 2016, article 4 § 2.

[55] Gaëlle Marti, op. cit., p. 328.

[56] Gaëlle Marti, op. cit., pp. 329-332.

[57] Amandine Scherrer, Antoine Mégie, et Valsamis Mitsilegas, op. cit.

[58] European Commission, Directorate-General for Communication, “Public opinion in the European Union”, Standard Eurobarometer 86, Autumn 2016, 213 pages.

[59] European Commission, Directorate-General for Communication, “Public opinion in the European Union”, Standard Eurobarometer 86, Autumn 2016, pp. 92-96.

Poursuivre les crimes contre les intérêts financiers de l’Union européenne : pourquoi créer le Parquet européen ?

Les crimes financiers ne sont généralement pas ceux liés à la criminalité grave dans l’esprit des gens, mais ils nuisent tout de même réellement aux sociétés européennes. La corruption, le blanchiment d’argent, la fraude à la TVA et les fraudes fiscales en général menacent l’intégrité du budget de l’UE et des États. Les pertes sont difficiles à estimer en raison du manque évident de données sur ces actions, qui se déroulent dans l’ombre du marché libre, mais plusieurs tentatives pour le faire ont révélé qu’elles représentent des milliards d’euros chaque année. L’UE a du mal à lutter contre ces infractions. Les organismes luttant contre la criminalité financière existent, mais ils souffrent de leur lourdeur, de leur lenteur et, par conséquent, de leur manque d’efficacité. De plus, leur multiplication conduit à une mauvaise communication entre eux, et même parfois à la méfiance. Ces défauts expliquent en partie la décision de créer le Parquet européen (European Public Prosecutor’s Office, EPPO), dont les activités ont commencé cette année. Cependant, ces organismes  ont tout de même produit des résultats au fil des ans et certains pensent qu’ils devraient d’abord être améliorés avant de créer un nouvel organisme. Mais l’EPPO est innovant sur un point très important: il s’agit de la première institution européenne avec le pouvoir de poursuivre sur une base pénale, alors que les autres organes, avec des résultats ou non, sont surtout des outils de coopération et, pour l’Office européen de lutte antifraude (OLAF), un outil de poursuite administrative.

L’importance des crimes financiers

Les infractions au budget de l’UE qui seront combattues par le Parquet européen sont définies aux Articles 3 et 4 de la Directive (UE) 2017/1371[1] relative à la lutte contre la fraude portant atteinte aux intérêts financiers de l’Union au moyen du droit pénal, également appelée Directive PIF. Le délai de transposition de la Directive PIF en droit national a expiré le 6 juillet 2019, mais, malgré l’importance de la poursuite de ces infractions pour les finances publiques nationales, seuls douze États membres avaient notifié la transposition complète à cette date. Heureusement, presque tous les États membres avaient communiqué une transposition complète, ou du moins partielle, en juin 2020.[2] La Directive répartit les infractions entre la fraude, visée à l’Article 3, et les autres infractions pénales, visées à l’Article 4.

L’un des problèmes concernant la fraude fiscale est que les règles existantes sont souvent incapables de suivre la vitesse croissante de l’économie et de garantir que tous les acteurs du marché paient leur juste part d’impôts, puisque les règles fiscales internationales et nationales actuelles ont été conçues pour la plupart au début du 20ème siècle. Selon le Parlement européen, il y a un besoin urgent et continu de réforme des règles, afin que les systèmes fiscaux internationaux, européens et nationaux soient adaptés aux nouveaux défis économiques, sociaux et technologiques du XXIe siècle.[3]

            Plusieurs évaluations ont tenté de quantifier l’ampleur des pertes dues à la fraude fiscale, à l’évasion fiscale et à la planification fiscale agressive, mais aucune d’entre elles ne fournit une image suffisamment large à elle seule, en raison de la nature des données, l’objectif de la fraude étant de rester cachée, ou de leur absence. En effet, certains États membres évitent de préparer leurs propres estimations nationales des écarts fiscaux et, en outre, les méthodologies ne sont pas harmonisées. Dans certains cas, ils sont différents mais complémentaires, mais cela montre surtout leur fragmentation et leur incompatibilité. En conséquence, il y a un manque de statistiques fiables et objectives sur l’ampleur de l’évitement fiscal et l’évasion fiscale. En vertu de l’Article 280 du Traité sur l’Union européenne, les États membres sont tenus de prendre la fraude à l’égard de l’UE avec le même sérieux que celle portant atteinte à leur propre budget et sont tenus de coordonner leurs actions visant à protéger les intérêts financiers de l’Union contre la fraude et d’organiser, avec l’aide de la Commission européenne, une coopération étroite et régulière entre les services compétents de leurs administrations. Cependant, cette coopération a été sérieusement affaiblie dès le départ, en raison des différences dans la définition des fraudes et leur signalement aux autorités bruxelloises.[4] Mais la mise en œuvre de la Directive PIF et la création de l’EPPO devraient harmoniser les pratiques, les méthodologies, ainsi que les définitions et les rapports.

Fraude à la taxe sur la valeur ajoutée (TVA)

La fraude à la TVA entraîne des pertes substantielles, alors que la TVA est une source importante de recettes fiscales pour les budgets nationaux. En 2016, les recettes de TVA dans les 28 États membres de l’UE se sont élevées à 1 044 milliards d’euros, ce qui correspond à 18% de l’ensemble des recettes fiscales dans les États membres. En comparaison, le budget annuel de l’UE pour 2017 s’élevait à 157 milliards D’euros. Cependant, chaque année, de grandes quantités des recettes de TVA attendues sont perdues à cause de la fraude. Les pertes sont estimées en calculant l’écart de TVA, qui représente la différence entre les recettes de TVA attendues et celle effectivement perçue. La perte n’est pas due seulement à la fraude, mais aussi à la faillite, aux erreurs de calcul et à l’évitement.[5] En 2009, la Commission européenne avait estimé l’écart de TVA dans l’UE à un montant compris entre 90 et 113 milliards d’euros pour la période 2000-2006. En 2017, le montant total de la TVA dans l’UE perdue en 2015 a été estimé à 151,5 milliards d’euros, ce qui représente une perte de 12% du total des recettes de TVA attendues et une augmentation significative sur une période de 10 ans. Selon le rapport de 2018 sur l’écart de TVA (publié le 11 septembre 2018),[6] l’écart de TVA pour l’année 2016 est tombé en dessous de 150 milliards d’euros et s’est élevé à 147,1 milliards d’euros.

La Commission estime qu’environ 50 milliards d’euros sont perdus à cause de la fraude à la TVA transfrontalière, tandis qu’Europol estime qu’environ 60 milliards d’euros de fraude à la TVA sont liés à la criminalité organisée et au financement du terrorisme. Une chose est sûre : l’impact économique de l’écart de TVA reste extrêmement important. Il représenterait environ 1,5% du PIB des États membres et pourrait atteindre des niveaux allant jusqu’à 10% des recettes de TVA dans certains États membres. Il convient de rappeler que l’écart de TVA ne concerne pas seulement les États membres, mais également l’UE, puisqu’un taux uniforme de 0,3% est prélevé sur l’assiette de TVA harmonisée de chaque État membre comme l’une des ressources propres de l’UE. Il convient également de souligner que la fraude à la TVA affecte aussi les entreprises  « honnêtes », car les fraudeurs créent des distorsions de concurrence sur le marché.[7]

L’évasion fiscale

L’évasion fiscale est un autre problème urgent pour l’Union européenne et les États membres, et il doit être abordé pour diverses raisons. Dans un premier temps, elle empêche les États de mettre en œuvre des politiques sociales, économiques, environnementales, culturelles et autres en les privant de recettes suffisantes. L’évasion fiscale est une menace pour la crédibilité des institutions démocratiques. Elle sape les efforts du gouvernement pour promouvoir le bien-être et la cohésion sociale de sa population et l’empêche d’exercer sa fonction sociale, tout en portant atteinte à la confiance des citoyens dans les moyens d’un gouvernement légitime et démocratique. Deuxièmement, en évitant les devoirs et les responsabilités de leurs citoyens, les fraudeurs fiscaux font peser un fardeau plus lourd sur ceux qui finissent par payer les coûts effectifs de l’imposition, et qui sont, dans leur majorité, membres des parties inférieure et moyenne de la distribution des revenus. En outre, il encourage les institutions financières, les autorités ou les politiciens à se livrer à des activités de corruption pour leur propre enrichissement ou d’autres avantages, car généralement intéressés à augmenter leurs profits même si cela implique de contourner les règles existantes.[8]

Les données disponibles suggèrent que l’écart fiscal de l’UE, résultant principalement de l’évasion fiscale intérieure, pourrait s’élever à 825 milliards d’euros par an, sur la base des données de 2015. Il est plus difficile d’estimer l’évasion fiscale des entreprises dans l’UE, mais les données disponibles suggèrent des montants différents, de 50 milliards d’euros par an à 190 milliards d’euros par an selon des études précédentes du Parlement européen.[9] La moitié de tous les États membres de l’UE ont des écarts fiscaux qui pourraient dépasser leurs dépenses de santé, et souvent de manière considérable. En conséquence, de nombreux États membres de l’UE pourraient percevoir une part beaucoup plus importante de l’impôt légalement dû qu’ils ne le font actuellement.[10]

Le blanchiment d’argent

Le blanchiment d’argent est une infraction pénale en soi, mais c’est un sujet très vaste et complexe puisqu’il est le résultat d’une concentration d’activités criminelles. Il peut trouver son origine dans diverses activités illicites, telles que la corruption, le trafic d’armes et d’êtres humains, le trafic de drogues, l’évasion et la fraude fiscales. Il peut être utilisé pour financer le terrorisme et il peut se produire de diverses manières, telles que l’exploitation astucieuse d’un réseau complexe et entrelacé de juridictions secrètes et/ou de paradis fiscaux, de “sociétés écrans”, l’abus de failles dans la législation existante de lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent, etc.[11] En raison de règles de divulgation inadéquates, il est beaucoup trop facile d’utiliser une société ou des arrangements juridiques tels que des trusts dans l’UE pour dissimuler son identité à des fins de blanchiment d’argent.

Selon la résolution du Parlement européen sur la criminalité financière, la fraude fiscale et l’évasion fiscale du 26 mars 2019,[12] le produit des activités criminelles dans l’UE est estimé à 110 milliards d’euros par an, ce qui correspond à 1% du PIB total de l’Union. Dans certains États membres, jusqu’à 70% des cas de blanchiment d’argent ont une dimension transfrontalière, et l’ampleur du blanchiment d’argent est estimée par l’Office des Nations unies contre la Drogue et le Crime (ONUDC) à l’équivalent de 2 à 5% du PIB mondial, soit environ 715 à 1870 milliards d’euros par an.

L’ensemble du cadre juridique européen de lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent est basé sur les recommandations du Groupe d’Action Financière (GAFI), transposées dans les directives successives de lutte contre ce crime. Ces recommandations constituent la pierre angulaire du cadre international de lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent et le financement du terrorisme. Elles ont été approuvées par plus de 180 pays et sont universellement reconnues comme établissant les normes internationales. Elles ont été révisées de temps à autre et mises en œuvre dans l’UE par le biais des différentes Directives de lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent, qui ont étendu ses outils et les infractions pénales qui pourraient y être liées, telles que le terrorisme. La Directive 91/308/CE de l’UE sur la lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent (Anti-money Laundering Directive 1, AMLD1) a mis en œuvre les recommandations du Groupe d’action financière [13](GAFI) le 10 juin 1991 dans le cadre des compétences du traité, qui ne prévoyait pas d’incrimination.[14] La cinquième Directive sur la lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent[15], la dernière, publiée le 19 juin 2018, complète le cadre existant de l’UE en matière de lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent et le financement du terrorisme.[16] Elle est censée accroître la transparence, faciliter le travail des cellules de renseignement financier, mettre en place des registres centralisés des comptes bancaires pour identifier les détenteurs et traiter les risques liés aux monnaies virtuelles et aux cartes prépayées anonymes.[17] Cependant, selon la résolution sur les crimes financiers, la fraude fiscale et l’évasion fiscale, certains États membres n’ont pas transposé totalement ou partiellement l’AMLD4, et ils doivent également transposer l’AMLD5 avant 2020.

La corruption

De toute évidence, la corruption est difficile à mesurer, mais selon le CRIM[18] (Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering), le problème est réel et étendu. Ses impacts sont ressentis par les citoyens de l’UE. Selon le Baromètre mondial de la Corruption de Transparency International, 53% des citoyens européens ont estimé que leur gouvernement faisait un mauvais travail dans la lutte contre la corruption.[19] En outre, selon l’Eurobaromètre, “malgré une baisse de 8 points depuis 2013, plus des deux tiers (68%) des personnes interrogées pensent toujours que la corruption est répandue dans leur propre pays. Dans l’ensemble de l’UE, plus de la moitié des personnes interrogées pensent que la corruption est répandue parmi les partis politiques (56%) et parmi les politiciens aux niveaux national, régional ou local (53%). Un quart des Européens (25%) disent être personnellement touchés par la corruption dans leur vie quotidienne, bien qu’environ un Européen sur dix seulement déclare connaître quelqu’un qui a touché ou touche des pots-de-vin (12%), mais il existe des variations au niveau des pays. »[20]  Ces cas sont des expériences réelles mais sous-estimées de corruption et, par conséquent, doivent être considérés comme le niveau minimum de corruption existant.

La corruption est estimée par la Commission européenne à environ 120 milliards d’euros par an, soit un pour cent du PIB, et le secteur public est l’un des plus sensibles à cette pratique. Selon les estimations de l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE), l’argent drainé par la corruption représente entre 20% et 25% du budget des marchés publics, soit environ 2 billions de dollars par an. Il n’existe aucun moyen sûr de mesurer les effets de la corruption sur les intérêts financiers de l’UE à partir des données sur les expériences de petite corruption. De par leur nature, ils ne peuvent pas couvrir des domaines tels que les marchés et la gestion des programmes et projets de l’UE, qui peuvent être influencés par la corruption à moyenne et grande échelle. Cependant, selon le CRIM,  » quand il y a au moins 20 millions de cas de corruption mineure dans les secteurs publics de l’UE, il est évident que le phénomène a également un effet de contagion dans les parties de l’administration publique des États membres (et les personnes politiques correspondantes), qui ont la responsabilité de la gestion des fonds de l’UE et d’autres intérêts financiers.”[21]

Il ne s’agit pas seulement d’une perte d’argent, elle a un impact sur la société dans son ensemble, sous tous ses aspects.[22] Elle fausse la concurrence et réduit la qualité, la durabilité et la sécurité des projets publics. D’un point de vue financier, la corruption fait grimper les coûts pour un service de mauvaise qualité, sans bénéficier au développement économique du pays. Elle a également un impact significatif sur la santé, la sécurité et l’environnement. En ne respectant pas les normes environnementales appropriées, elle entraîne une utilisation irresponsable des ressources naturelles et augmente les risques pour la santé et la sécurité. La prévention et la lutte contre la corruption feront l’objet d’un suivi et d’une évaluation réguliers du cadre juridique des États membres dans le cadre du nouveau mécanisme d’Etat de droit. L’Etat de droit est consacré à l’Article 2 du Traité sur l’Union européenne comme l’une des valeurs communes à tous les États membres. En vertu de l’Etat de droit, toutes les puissances publiques agissent toujours dans les limites fixées par la loi, conformément aux valeurs de la démocratie et des droits fondamentaux, et sous le contrôle de tribunaux indépendants et impartiaux. Garantir le respect de l’Etat de droit est une responsabilité primordiale de chaque État membre, mais l’Union a un intérêt commun et un rôle à jouer pour résoudre les problèmes d’Etat de droit où qu’ils se présentent. Dans la dernière décennie, l’UE a élaboré et testé un certain nombre d’instruments visant à faire respecter l’Etat de droit. En effet, les graves problèmes d’Etat de droit dans certains États membres ont déclenché des débats au niveau européen et national sur la manière de renforcer la capacité de l’UE à faire face à de telles situations. Dans sa communication de juillet 2019, la Commission a proposé que l’UE et ses États membres redoublent d’efforts pour promouvoir une culture politique et juridique solide soutenant l’Etat de droit et développent des instruments empêchant les problèmes d’Etat de droit d’émerger ou de s’approfondir.[23]

Cette idée a pris forme avec la création du Mécanisme européen pour l’État de droit, qui est conçu comme un cycle annuel visant à promouvoir l’Etat de droit et à prévenir l’émergence ou l’approfondissement de problèmes. Il vise à améliorer la compréhension et la prise de conscience des problèmes et des développements importants dans des domaines ayant une incidence directe sur le respect de l’Etat de droit – système judiciaire, cadre de lutte contre la corruption, pluralisme et liberté des médias, et autres questions institutionnelles liées à l’équilibre des pouvoirs.[24] Dans le cadre du semestre européen de gouvernance économique, les défis de la lutte contre la corruption sont évalués en mettant l’accent sur les domaines à risque, tels que les marchés publics, l’administration publique, l’environnement des entreprises et les soins de santé.[25]

La défense des intérêts financiers de L’UE

L’Office européen de lutte antifraude (OLAF)

Les racines de L’OLAF se trouvent dans la Task Force « Unité de coordination de la lutte antifraude » (UCLAF), créée en 1988 dans le cadre du Secrétariat Général de la Commission européenne. Elle a travaillé aux côtés des services nationaux de lutte contre la fraude et a fourni la coordination et l’assistance nécessaires pour lutter contre la fraude transnationale organisée. Mais après avoir été sévèrement critiquée par la Cour des comptes européenne pour la qualité de son travail opérationnel et de renseignement, le Parlement européen a demandé la création d’un office antifraude indépendant.[26] Cela a abouti à la création, par la décision 1999/352, [27]de l’Office européen de lutte antifraude doté d’un mandat d’enquête indépendant. Il a également le droit de mener des enquêtes internes au sein des institutions de l’UE.

Au fil des années, ses opérations ont été renforcées par divers programmes, tels que les Programmes Hercule successifs, ou le lancement de l’outil web Fraud Notification System.[28] Des modifications importantes ont été apportées le 1er octobre 2013, lorsque le règlement 883/2013[29] relatif aux enquêtes menées par l’OLAF est entré en vigueur. Il définit en outre les droits des personnes concernées, introduit un échange de vues annuel entre l’OLAF et les institutions de l’UE et exige que chaque État membre désigne un service de coordination antifraude.

L’OLAF a deux responsabilités majeures. Premièrement, il est chargé de mener des enquêtes internes au sein des institutions et autres organes de l’UE, qui ont l’obligation de coopérer pleinement aux enquêtes de l’OLAF et de lui communiquer toute information concernant des soupçons de fraude et d’irrégularité. Deuxièmement, l’OLAF a également la responsabilité d’aider les agences des États membres dans leurs enquêtes sur les fraudes et les irrégularités, tant en termes d’enquête, de renseignement que d’aide à la liaison entre les différentes agences nationales.

Europol

Europol trouve ses racines dans le Traité de Maastricht.[30] Elle a été organisée de facto pour la première fois en 1993 sous le nom d’Unité antidrogue Europol (EDU) et officiellement créée en 1995 par la Convention “Europol”, entrée en vigueur le 1er octobre 1998. La Convention définit l’Unité de coopération policière comme une structure double, avec un service d’analyse et de production de bases de données (un service composé de personnes directement engagées par Europol) et, d’autre part, un service d’officiers de liaison chargé de faciliter la coopération bilatérale et/ou multilatérale entre les États membres.[31] Europol a été pleinement intégrée dans l’UE avec la décision 2009/371/JAI du Conseil afin de « soutenir et de renforcer l’action des autorités compétentes des États membres et leur coopération mutuelle dans la prévention de la criminalité organisée, du terrorisme et d’autres formes graves de criminalité affectant deux États membres ou plus […]. » Europol travaille également avec certains États partenaires non-membres de l’UE et des organisations internationales.

En un mot, Europol vise à simplifier les échanges d’informations entre les services répressifs (douanes, renseignement, gardes-frontières, etc). Elle a mis en place un réseau spécifique qui se concentre sur la fraude intracommunautaire (missing trader intra-community, MTIC) dite «à l’opérateur défaillant» (des pays tiers tels que la Norvège et la Suisse en font également partie). Depuis 2017, Europol a mis en place des équipes d’enquête conjointes, qui peuvent être considérées comme un  » outil de coopération entre les agences nationales d’enquête dans la lutte contre la criminalité transfrontalière. Ils facilitent la coordination des enquêtes et des poursuites menées en parallèle dans plusieurs États. »[32]

Eurojust

Le 14 décembre 2000, à l’initiative du Portugal, de la France, de la Suède et de la Belgique, une unité provisoire de coopération judiciaire a été créée sous le nom de Pro-Eurojust, opérant depuis le bâtiment du Conseil à Bruxelles. L’idée est née d’une discussion sur la création d’une unité de coopération judiciaire lors d’un Conseil européen qui s’est tenu à Tampere (Finlande) les 15 et 16 octobre 1999. Avec les attentats du 11 septembre aux États-Unis, l’accent mis sur la lutte contre le terrorisme est passé de la sphère régionale/nationale à son contexte international le plus large et a servi de catalyseur pour l’officialisation, par la décision 2002/187/JAI du Conseil, de la création d’Eurojust en tant qu’unité de coordination judiciaire. Depuis 2002, Eurojust s’est considérablement développée, tout comme ses tâches opérationnelles et son implication dans la coopération judiciaire européenne. Plus de pouvoirs et un ensemble révisé de règles sont devenus nécessaires. Le Traité de Lisbonne contient un chapitre important dans le développement d’Eurojust dans son Article 85, qui mentionne Eurojust et définit sa mission, 

« soutenir et renforcer la coordination et la coopération entre les autorités nationales chargées des enquêtes et des poursuites en ce qui concerne les infractions graves affectant deux États membres ou plus [.].”

Eurojust travaille sur la base des opérations menées et des informations fournies par les États membres et par Europol. Après de longues négociations depuis juillet 2013, le Parlement européen et le Conseil ont adopté le Règlement sur l’Agence de l’Union européenne pour la coopération en matière de justice pénale en novembre 2018. Le règlement établit un nouveau système de gouvernance, clarifie les relations entre Eurojust et le Parquet européen, prescrit un nouveau régime de protection des données, adopte de nouvelles règles pour les relations extérieures d’Eurojust et renforce le rôle des parlements européen et nationaux dans le contrôle démocratique des activités d’Eurojust.[33]

Le Parquet européen (European Public Prosecutor’s Office, EPPO)

L’idée du Parquet européen n’est pas nouvelle : elle est évoquée dès 1996 par le Président du Parlement européen et quelques juges en raison des insuffisances de l’entraide judiciaire internationale, mais sa création attendra des années.

L’ouvrage Corpus Juris, commandé par la Commission en 1997 et dirigé par M. Delmas-Marty, marque un tournant en proposant pour la première fois de créer un Parquet européen spécialisé, composé d’un procureur général européen et de procureurs délégués européens dans les États membres. Un livre vert sur la protection pénale des intérêts financiers de la Communauté et la création d’un procureur européen est publié en 2001, affirmant la volonté de l’UE de le créer, qui sera défini dans les traités de Nice (2001) et de Lisbonne (2007). Ce n’est qu’en 2013 que la Commission présente officiellement une proposition de règlement du Conseil sur la création du Parquet, mais les débats sont bloqués par la ferme opposition de certains États comme les Pays-Bas, la Suède, la Pologne ou la Hongrie. Enfin, 16 États membres qui souhaitent réellement la création du Parquet décident de lancer le projet dans le cadre d’une coopération renforcée par le règlement 2017/1939 du Conseil.[34] Ils sont maintenant 22,[35] mais contrairement aux Pays-Bas, qui rejoignent la coopération en 2018, la Hongrie, le Danemark, l’Irlande, la Pologne et la Suède refusent toujours. Cependant, ils pourront participer quand ils le souhaitent à l’avenir.[36]

Il semble que le choix d’adhérer ou non au Parquet européen relève davantage d’une affiliation politique que de priorités nationales.[37]

Étudier les arguments contre le Parquet européen

Motifs institutionnels et judiciaires : l’efficacité des institutions préexistantes

Certains députés européens ont fait valoir que les institutions européennes antifraude existent déjà et qu’elles devraient être améliorées et non remplacées ou complétées par une autre. À l’inverse, d’autres étaient convaincus que le Parquet pouvait résoudre les problèmes persistants entre ces institutions.[38] Selon l’OLAF[39], seuls 39% des dossiers qu’il a transmis aux autorités judiciaires nationales ont donné lieu à des mises en accusation, et malgré les progrès importants d’Eurojust, l’unité est jugée insuffisante et bien trop lente.[40]

Les institutions existantes sont confrontées à des problèmes majeurs d’empiètement sur leurs compétences respectives, empiètement qui conduit à des logiques de rivalité, de manque de confiance et même de méfiance. C’est le cas entre l’OLAF et Eurojust, notamment en matière de criminalité organisée. Ces instruments reposent sur des principes institutionnels opposés, car Eurojust traite des affaires relevant du troisième pilier, tandis que l’OLAF est compétent pour les détournements de fonds communautaires relevant du premier pilier. Il pourrait sembler qu’ils ne se croisent jamais, mais, dans la pratique, la distinction n’est pas si claire. C’est le même problème entre Europol et Eurojust. Ils sont censés coopérer les uns avec les autres, mais ils agissent plus comme des rivaux que des partenaires. Cette rivalité est basée sur l’empiètement de leurs compétences, mais aussi sur le fait que l’institutionnalisation de la sécurité européenne est toujours en cours. Ce ne sont pas des instruments si anciens et leurs pouvoirs changent régulièrement, de même que leurs relations et leur coopération.[41]

L’incertitude concernant le Parquet européen provient du risque d’empiétement entre celui-ci et les autres instruments, tout comme cela s’est produit avant sa création. En effet, conformément à la Directive (UE) 2017/1371, il sera compétent pour poursuivre la fraude, la corruption, le blanchiment d’argent et l’appropriation illicite. Toutefois, conformément à la décision 2002/187/JAI du Conseil du 28 février 2002, portant création d’Eurojust en vue de renforcer la lutte contre la criminalité grave, qui a établi Eurojust en tant qu ‘ “organe de l’Union” doté de la personnalité juridique, la compétence générale d’Eurojust couvre, entre autres, la fraude et la corruption, ainsi que toute infraction pénale portant atteinte aux intérêts financiers de la Communauté européenne et le blanchiment du produit du crime.[42] Le Règlement (UE, Euratom) 883/2013 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 11 septembre 2013 confirme que le mandat de l’OLAF s’étend au-delà de la protection des intérêts financiers pour inclure toutes les activités relatives à la sauvegarde des intérêts de l’UE contre des comportements irréguliers susceptibles d’entraîner des procédures administratives ou pénales. Même si elle ne fait pas partie de ses priorités, la fraude organisée est également considérée par Europol comme l’une des plus grandes menaces pour la sécurité. Tous ces instruments sont censés coopérer, d’autant plus qu’ils défendent les mêmes intérêts, mais ils n’ont pas le même niveau d’indépendance, ils ne répondent pas aux mêmes institutions européennes et ils utilisent des outils et des approches différents pour lutter contre la fraude et la corruption. Le Parquet européen pourrait être un autre organe conduisant à la fragmentation du système judiciaire européen, réduisant l’efficacité globale des instruments.

Toutefois, sa création pourrait également conduire à une harmonisation des pratiques de ces institutions. Étant donné qu’il est le seul instrument à pouvoir de poursuite et qu’Europol, Eurojust et l’OLAF sont des instruments de recherche et de coopération mais qui souffrent d’un manque de confiance de la part des autorités nationales, le Parquet pourrait être le lien avec les forces de police nationales. Il pourrait recueillir des informations auprès de toutes les autres institutions, et il leur serait plus facile de coopérer. En ce qui concerne le risque d’empiétement, le Règlement (UE) 2018/1727 clarifie et définit la compétence d’Eurojust à la lumière de la création du Parquet. Il affirme que :

« à compter de la date à laquelle le Parquet européen remplit ses missions, Eurojust devrait pouvoir continuer d’exercer ses compétences dans des affaires concernant des infractions pour lesquelles le Parquet européen est compétent lorsque ces infractions concernent à la fois des États membres qui participent à la coopération renforcée concernant la création du Parquet européen et des États membres qui ne participent pas à une telle coopération renforcée. En pareil cas, Eurojust devrait agir soit à la demande de ces États membres non participants, soit à la demande du Parquet européen. En tout état de cause, Eurojust devrait rester compétente pour les infractions portant atteinte aux intérêts financiers de l’Union lorsque le Parquet européen n’est pas compétent ou lorsque celui-ci, bien qu’il soit compétent, n’exerce pas sa compétence. »[43]

Le Règlement recommande également de réduire la charge administrative des membres nationaux afin de renforcer ses fonctions opérationnelles. Dans la même idée, Europol devrait se concentrer sur la collecte d’informations pour les autres institutions et l’OLAF devrait toujours gérer les enquêtes administratives. Enfin, la Directive (UE) 2017/1371 harmonise les définitions des infractions pénales portées contre le budget de l’UE pour les États membres participant à la coopération renforcée. Les États membres sont censés lutter contre la fraude de l’UE aussi sérieusement que contre celle affectant leur propre budget et, à cette fin, coopérer les uns avec les autres et partager des informations. Ceci était vraiment difficile en raison des différences dans la définition des fraudes et leur signalement à l’OLAF, mais le Parquet devrait être une solution à la fragmentation de la définition des infractions pénales.

Motifs économiques : les coûts et gains

Le coût d’une autre institution judiciaire est au cœur des préoccupations des États membres. Le Parquet représente plus de dépenses, alors que les instruments déjà existants pourraient être améliorés avant d’en créer de nouveaux. Un calcul coûts / avantages devrait être effectué pour analyser cet argument, après examen du budget de l’UE (voir le graphique ci-dessous).

Le budget de l’UE finance des activités allant du développement des zones rurales à la préservation de l’environnement, en passant par la protection des frontières extérieures et la promotion des droits de l’Homme. Il est décidé conjointement par la Commission, le Conseil et le Parlement. La Commission soumet un projet au Conseil et au Parlement pour examen. Ils peuvent apporter des changements ; s’ils ne sont pas d’accord, ils doivent trouver un compromis. Mais c’est la Commission qui est responsable des dépenses. Les pays de l’UE et la Commission se partagent la responsabilité d’environ 80% du budget. Le budget de chaque année fixe les montants convenus à l’avance selon un plan connu sous le nom de cadre financier pluriannuel. Cela permet à l’UE de planifier efficacement ses programmes de financement plusieurs années à l’avance. Le cadre actuel s’étend de 2021 à 2027.[44]

L’UE bénéficie de 153,6 milliards d’euros en 2020[45], et les instruments étudiés se trouvent dans le budget de la Commission européenne. Europol est répertorié sous « Sécurité Intérieure ». Le Parquet européen et Eurojust figurent dans la rubrique « Justice ». L’OLAF figure dans la rubrique « dépenses administratives » du domaine politique « lutte contre la fraude ». Selon le budget 2020 de la Commission européenne, il bénéficie de 151,89 millions, soit 0,98% du budget général de l’UE. Le budget administratif 2019 de l’OLAF s’élève à 59,72 millions d’euros, celui d’Eurojust à environ 37,67 millions d’euros et celui d’Europol à environ 137,14 millions d’euros,[46] pour un total d’environ 234,53 millions d’euros. La budgétisation au sein du Parquet suit les lignes générales applicables aux institutions et organes de l’UE, réitérées à l’article 91 du Règlement EPPO. Le budget accordé au Parquet dans le projet de Budget général 2019 est de 4,9 millions d’euros. Dans une lettre rectificative au projet de Budget général pour 2019, la Commission a proposé le recrutement de deux procureurs supplémentaires pour tenir compte de la participation imprévue de Malte et des Pays-bas au Parquet européen. Cependant, les effectifs du personnel restent inchangés, en raison des attentes d’une faible charge de travail dans les nouveaux États membres participants.[47]

Graphique 1: budget 2019 de la Commission européenne

Source: Budget de la Commission européenne, 2019-2020. Online : https://eur-lex.europa.eu/budget/data/DB/2020/en/SEC03.pdf

Bien que les coûts liés à des questions telles que la dotation en personnel et l’infrastructure puissent peut-être être estimés avec une certaine précision, ce sont les coûts et les avantages plus larges, en termes d’impact financier de la fraude, qui causent des difficultés. Pourtant, ce n’est qu’en évaluant les pertes financières dues à la fraude que l’efficacité finale d’une telle mesure peut être évaluée.[48] Mais si les coûts et les avantages sont comparés rapidement et dans l’absolu, étant donné que l’écart fiscal de l’UE résultant en grande partie de l’évasion fiscale intérieure pourrait être de 825 milliards d’euros par an à lui seul, le coût de la mise en place du Parquet n’est pas si élevé. 

Motifs politiques : entre confiance et souveraineté

Ces motifs ne sont pas directement liés, mais ils se contrebalancent l’un l’autre puisque, lorsque les opposants brandissent le drapeau classique de la menace à la souveraineté, les défenseurs ont souligné le gain de confiance des citoyens de l’UE. Deux visions de l’Europe s’affrontent dans cet argument : l’UE des peuples contre l’UE des États.

Le débat sur la question de savoir si les États sont toujours souverains s’ils se soumettent au droit international n’est pas nouveau, et le projet de Parquet européen est l’une des illustrations de son actualité. Cependant, il convient de noter que, puisque ce projet prend place dans l’UE, la question de la souveraineté vis-à-vis du droit international n’est pas exactement pertinente. En effet, tout le monde s’accorde sur la spécificité de l’UE en tant qu’ordre juridique international. Le droit international a peu d’organes législatifs propres, c’est pourquoi il dépend de l’État pour l’élaboration des lois, mais aussi pour leur application. En conséquence, les États souverains fonctionnent non seulement en tant que parties contractantes individuelles comme dans les traités contractuels, mais aussi en tant que législateurs dans l’ordre juridique international.­ Le rôle des États souverains en tant que législateurs a des conséquences normatives importantes. Leur rôle d’officiels les rend responsables et limite leur compétence en matière de droit international. Ils sont doublement contraints et donc responsables, en interne mais aussi en externe par le biais des règles du droit international.[49] Étant donné que l’UE est l’union d’États indépendants la plus prospère au monde, tant sur le plan économique que politique, avec son propre processus législatif, les théories du droit international ne s’appliquent pas. Mais en raison de cette coopération profonde entre les Etats, la question de la réalité de leur souveraineté au sein de l’UE reste une source importante de débats.

L’Union européenne s’appuie sur des traités ratifiés par les États et n’existe donc que parce qu’ils l’ont convenu. La Cour permanente de justice internationale a refusé de voir dans la conclusion d’un traité par lequel un État s’engage à accomplir ou à s’abstenir d’accomplir un acte particulier un abandon de sa souveraineté, car “le droit de contracter des engagements internationaux est un attribut de la souveraineté de l’État.”[50] Cependant, l’UE est suffisamment autonome pour agir sur les États membres. Dès le début, elle constitue une organisation originale, qui tend à élargir ses compétences au-delà de la sphère économique initiale par l’effet de débordement.[51] Les traités et la jurisprudence permettent d’inclure de nouvelles sphères dans le domaine européen. A titre d’exemple, le Parquet européen a été envisagé dès le Traité de Lisbonne et, par conséquent, selon certains responsables politiques, l’institution de ce nouvel organe ne fait que suivre le développement logique de l’UE.

L’impact de l’UE sur la souveraineté des États dans un sens matériel peut être vu à différents niveaux. Premièrement, en ce qui concerne les compétences de l’Etat, celles transférées à l’UE couvrent un domaine de plus en plus large, dont même certaines compétences traditionnellement considérées comme des pouvoirs souverains de l’Etat comme l’argent, les impôts, la justice, la défense. Les États ont perdu leur pouvoir de décision et sont privés de leur droit de s’opposer à l’application du droit de l’UE sur leur territoire. Cela peut aussi être considéré comme une violation de la souveraineté territoriale, mais c’est plus une mutation qu’un effacement. Deuxièmement, en ce qui concerne la citoyenneté, les États doivent traiter avec les citoyens européens comme ils le feraient avec leurs propres ressortissants. La citoyenneté européenne n’est que de superposition, mais il a été reconnu que son statut est fondamental pour les ressortissants des États membres. Le statut et les droits des étrangers de l’UE sont également gérés par elle, car les politiques de visa, d’asile et de migration sont décidées au sein de l’UE.[52] Cette érosion des attributs des États met en doute la réalité de leur souveraineté en raison de l’intégration européenne. Cependant, le statut d’État souverain est nécessaire pour être membre de l’UE, et comme nous le verrons, la souveraineté est préservée et même protégée par l’intégration européenne.

En effet, les États possèdent toujours la compétence de la compétence, en tant que maîtres des traités et ils ont le droit de partir unilatéralement. En outre, il n’y a pas de souveraineté concurrente de l’UE qui n’est pas un État. Cela est clairement indiqué dans l’Article 4§2 du Traité sur l’union Européenne, selon lequel :

“L’Union respecte l’égalité des États membres devant les traités ainsi que leur identité nationale, inhérente à leurs structures fondamentales politiques et constitutionnelles, y compris en ce qui concerne l’autonomie locale et régionale. Elle respecte les fonctions essentielles de l’État, notamment celles qui ont pour objet d’assurer son intégrité territoriale, de maintenir l’ordre public et de sauvegarder la sécurité nationale.  En particulier, la sécurité nationale reste de la seule responsabilité de chaque État membre.”[53]

Les compétences transférées à l’UE ne sont pas abandonnées par les États, elles sont exercées sur un mode alternatif. Les Etats ne sont pas privés de leurs compétences, ils sont privés du droit d’exercer seuls. Toutefois, le passage de l’exercice solitaire des pouvoirs de l’État à leur mise en commun et à leur gestion au sein d’un espace juridique et politique intégré n’est pas nécessairement préjudiciable à la préservation de la souveraineté de l’état. Dans le monde globalisé actuel, les États ne peuvent espérer avoir un impact sur les faits qu’ils veulent réglementer sans prise de décision collective. Ce sont généralement les questions examinées pour le Parquet, toutes les infractions ayant un caractère transnational, comme développé ci-dessus. L’efficacité de la souveraineté des États est liée à leur capacité à s’allier pour faire face aux problèmes transnationaux, afin qu’ils puissent peser sur la communauté internationale pour défendre leurs intérêts. Certains auteurs ont développé le concept allemand d’” Etat ouvert  » (offene Staatlichkeit), selon lequel assurer les missions de l’Etat repose sur la capacité des États à prendre des décisions concrètes, de sorte que l’exercice de certaines compétences au niveau supranational serait le seul moyen de préserver leur statut d’Etat.[54] 

            Certains États ont senti leur identité menacée par l’intégration juridique de l’UE à travers le principe de primauté. Après les arrêts rendus par les cours constitutionnelles nationales sur le principe de l’identité constitutionnelle, le droit primaire a intégré ce souci de préservation de leur singularité dans le Traité de Maastricht. Cette disposition est désormais incluse dans l’Article 4 § 2 TUE, cité plus haut, qui précise les contours de cette « identité nationale » à laquelle l’Union européenne doit le respect et la Cour a tenu compte de cette disposition afin d’interpréter, dans un sens plus favorable aux États, les dérogations aux libertés de circulation fondées sur des motifs liés à l’identité culturelle ou constitutionnelle des Etats.[55] En conséquence, même si le droit pénal ne fait pas partie de l’identité constitutionnelle, il pourrait sûrement être protégé par les Etats sous l’identité nationale s’ils estiment que l’UE cherche à reprendre cette compétence, ce qui n’est pas le cas. Comme déjà dit, le Parquet a été créé grâce à une coopération renforcée. Premièrement, cela signifie qu’ils ont choisi individuellement de faire partie du projet et n’ont accepté les règles pénales que dans le domaine financier en adoptant la directive PIF, qui unifie des définitions auparavant confuses. Deuxièmement, les États ne sont pas privés de leur droit pénal national, puisque le criminel sera jugé dans son pays ou dans le pays de la commission de l’infraction, par les tribunaux nationaux.

L’implication des tribunaux nationaux devrait également être une solution au manque de confiance des autorités nationales et des citoyens européens. En effet, l’un des problèmes existant dans des organismes tels que l’OLAF, Europol et Eurojust est lié au manque de confiance des autorités nationales envers les organismes européens. Premièrement, dans le cadre des instruments européens, les procureurs nationaux et les officiers de liaison ne s’inscrivent pas dans une logique d’autonomisation vis-à-vis du niveau national. En outre, les incertitudes liées aux contraintes organisationnelles et à la méconnaissance des dynamiques européennes entraînent peu d’échanges entre les niveaux national et européen et même, au final, un sentiment de perte de pouvoir et d’autorité. [56]Avec le Parquet, les autorités nationales seront entièrement impliquées dans le processus de poursuite. Les procureurs désignés, même indépendants, seront choisis pour la connaissance de leur propre système pénal et coordonneront les poursuites avec l’aide des forces de police nationales.

En ce qui concerne la confiance des citoyens envers l’UE, l’une des enquêtes les plus récentes est l’Eurobaromètre, commandé par la Commission européenne et publié en 2016.[57] Tout d’abord, l’enquête montre que les citoyens sont maintenant plus susceptibles de faire confiance à leurs institutions politiques nationales, après un déclin antérieur. Selon cette enquête, les Français sont clairement les plus méfiants vis-à-vis de leurs institutions nationales, alors que les Néerlandais ont surtout tendance à leur faire confiance. Les Hongrois ont plus tendance à ne pas faire confiance qu’à faire confiance, mais ils ont toujours un meilleur taux que les Français. On peut imaginer qu’une poursuite plus efficace des crimes financiers pourrait accroître la confiance des citoyens européens dans leurs institutions. En effet, en France par exemple, la confiance a été érodée par la révélation de scandales financiers dans les plus hautes sphères de l’Etat.

En outre, bien que toujours minoritaire, la confiance dans l’Union européenne a recommencé à augmenter. Elle reste toutefois nettement inférieure au meilleur score enregistré au cours des cinq dernières années : 40% au printemps 2015. Le rapport confiance / méfiance s’est légèrement améliorée, tout en restant défavorable, tant dans les pays hors zone euro (39% contre 50%, contre 37% contre 51% au printemps 2016) que dans les pays de la zone euro (34% contre 56%, contre 32% contre 56%). Une majorité de répondants font confiance à l’UE dans 11 États Membres, contre neuf au printemps 2016. Les répondants se méfient principalement de l’UE dans 17 États membres, avec des scores de 50% ou plus en Grèce (78%), en République tchèque (66%), en France (65%), à Chypre (63%), en Autriche (58%), en Italie (58%), en Slovénie (57%), au Royaume-Uni (56%), en Espagne (54%), en Allemagne (53%), aux Pays-Bas (51%), en Hongrie (50%) et en Croatie (50%).[58] En obtenant de bons résultats dans la poursuite des infractions au budget de l’UE, le Parquet européen pourrait accroître la confiance dans les institutions européennes. En effet, tout l’argent perdu dans ces affaires pourrait financer davantage de projets dont les citoyens bénéficieront réellement.


[1] Directive (UE) 2017/1371 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 5 juillet 2017 relative à la lutte contre la fraude portant atteinte aux intérêts financiers de l’Union au moyen du droit pénal, JO L 198 du 28.7.2017, p. 29–41.

[2] European Commission, 31st Annual Report on the protection of the European Union’s financial interests — Fight against fraud – 2019, 3.9.2020, p. 9.

Available online : https://ec.europa.eu/anti-fraud/sites/antifraud/files/pif_report_2019_en.pdf

[3] European Parliament, Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (2018/2121(INI)), P8_ TA-PROV(2019)0240, 26 March 2019, p.6.

[4] Quirke Brendan, “EU Fraud : institutional and legal competence”, Crime, Law and Social Change, Vol. 51, Issue 5, 2009, pp. 531-535.

[5] European Parliament, Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (2018/2121(INI)), P8_ TA-PROV(2019)0240, 26 March 2019, pp. 9-21.

[6] Center for Social and Economic Research & Institute for Advances Studies (for the European Commission, DG TAXUD), Study and Reports on the VAT Gap in the EU-28 Member States: 2018 Final Report, TAXUD/2015/CC/131.

[7] Lamensch M. and Ceci, E., VAT fraud: Economic impact, challenges and policy issues, European Parliament, Directorate-General for Internal Policies, Policy Department A – Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies, 15 October 2018, pp. 10-13.

[8] Rui Tavares, “Relationship between Money Laundering, Tax Evasion and Tax Havens”, Thematic Paper on Money Laundering, Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering (CRIM) 2012-2013, January 2013, p. 3.

[9] European Parliament, Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (2018/2121(INI)), P8_ TA-PROV(2019)0240, 26 March 2019.

[10] Richard Murphy, The European Tax Gap, Report for the Socialists and Democrats Group in the European Parliament, January 2019, pp. 1-2.

[11] Rui Tavares, “Relationship between Money Laundering, Tax Evasion and Tax Havens”, op. cit. pp. 2-3.

[12] European Parliament, Resolution on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (2018/2121(INI)), P8_ TA-PROV(2019)0240, 26 March 2019, pp. 37-43.

[13]  Le GAFI a été créé en 1989 par les États du G-7 qui ont invité un certain nombre d’autres états, tels que la Suisse, l’Autriche et les États du Benelux, pour établir un ensemble de normes internationales en matière de lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent.

[14] Mario Borghezio, “Money Laundering, banks and finance”, Thematic Paper on Money Laundering, Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering (CRIM) 2012-2013, January 2013.

[15] Directive (EU) 2018/843 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2018 amending Directive (EU) 2015/849 on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the purposes of money laundering or terrorist financing, OJ L 156, 19.6.2018, p. 43–74.

[16] Directive (EU) 2018/843 of the European Parliament and of the Council, 30 May 2018, OJEU L 156, 19.6.2018

[17] Beatrix Immenkamp, Gianluca Sgueo and Sofija Voronova with Alina Dobreva, “The fight against terrorism”, Briefing of the EPRS, European Parliament, June 2019, p.6.

[18] Skylakakis, “Areas of systemic corruption in the public administration of the Member States and measures in order to counter its negative effect for the EU”, Thematic Paper on Corruption, Special Committee on Organised Crime, Corruption and Money Laundering (CRIM) 2012-2013, November 2012.

[19] Transparency International, “People and Corruption : Citizens’ voices from around the world”, Global Corruption Barometer, November 2017, p. 4.

[20] Directorate-General for Migration and Home Affairs and co-ordinated by the Directorate-General for Communication, Special Eurobarometer 470 : Corruption, Survey requested by the European Commission, December 2017, p.5.

[21] Skylakakis, “Areas of systemic corruption in the public administration of the Member States and measures in order to counter its negative effect for the EU”, op. cit. pp. 1-2.

[22] Susanne Kühn and Laura B. Sherman, Curbing corruption in public procurement – A practical guide, Transparency International, 2014.

[23] COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS,  2020 Rule of Law Report The rule of law situation in the European Union, Brussels, 30.9.2020

COM(2020) 580 final.

[24] Idem.

[25] European Commission, 31st Annual Report on the protection of the European Union’s financial interests — Fight against fraud – 2019, 3.9.2020, p. 7.

[26] Brendan Quirke, “OLAF’s role in the fight against fraud in the European Union : do too many cooks spoil the broth?”, Crime, Law and Social Change, Volume 53, Issue 1, February 2010, pp 97–98.

[27] Décision du Parlement européen, du Conseil et de la Commission du 19 juillet 1999 relative à la nomination des membres du comité de surveillance de l’Office européen de lutte antifraude (OLAF), JO C 220 du 31.7.1999, p. 1–2.

[28] European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF), History : https://ec.europa.eu/anti-fraud/about-us/history_en 

[29] Règlement (UE, Euratom) n ° 883/2013 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 11 septembre 2013 relatif aux enquêtes effectuées par l’Office européen de lutte antifraude (OLAF), JO L 248 du 18.9.2013, p. 1–22.

[30] Treaty on European Union, signed at Maastricht on 7 February 1992, Article K.1.

[31] Amandine Scherrer, Antoine Mégie, et Valsamis Mitsilegas. « La stratégie de l’Union européenne contre la criminalité organisée : entre lacunes et inquiétudes », Cultures & Conflits, vol. 74, no. 2, 2009, pp. 103-104.

[32] M. Lamensch and, E. Ceci, VAT fraud: Economic impact, challenges and policy issues, European Parliament, Directorate-General for Internal Policies, Policy Department A – Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies, 15 October 2018, pp 35-36. Available : http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2018/626076/IPOL_STU(2018)626076_EN.pdf

[33] Eurojust : http://eurojust.europa.eu/Pages/home.aspx

[34] Council Regulation (EU) 2017/1939 of 12 October 2017 implementing enhanced cooperation on the establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (‘the EPPO’), OJ L 283, 31.10.2017, p. 1–71.

[35] États participants actuels: Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Chypre, Croatie, Espagne, Estonie, Finlande, France, Grèce, Italie, Lettonie, Lituanie, Luxembourg, Malte, Pays-Bas, Portugal, République Tchèque, Roumanie, Slovaquie, Slovénie.

[36] Toute l’Europe, « Qu’est-ce que le parquet européen ? », 18 March 2019. URL : https://www.touteleurope.eu/actualite/qu-est-ce-que-le-parquet-europeen.html 

[37] European Parliament, debates, plenary session of 28 April 2015 (CRE 28/04/2015-12, adopted text : P8_TA(2015)0173) ; plenary session of 4 October 2016 (CRE 04/10/2016-17, P8_TA(2016)0376) ; plenary session of 4 October 2017 (CRE 04/10/2017-17, P8_TA(2017)0384).

[38] Parlement européen, débats, déjà évoqués.

[39] OLAF, The OLAF report 2019 : Twentieth report of the European Anti-Fraud Office, 1 January to 31 December 2019, 2020, p. 40.

[40] Jean-Baptiste Jacquin, « Tentative de sauvetage du procureur européen », Le Monde, 7 décembre 2016.

[41] Amandine Scherrer, Antoine Mégie, et Valsamis Mitsilegas. « La stratégie de l’Union européenne contre la criminalité organisée : entre lacunes et inquiétudes », Cultures & Conflits, vol. 74, no. 2, 2009, pp. 105-110.

[42] Council Decision 2002/187/JHA of 28 February 2002, Article 4.

[43] Règlement (UE) 2018/1727 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 14 novembre 2018 relatif à l’Agence de l’Union européenne pour la coopération judiciaire en matière pénale (Eurojust) et remplaçant et abrogeant la décision 2002/187/JAI du Conseil, OJ L 295, 21.11.2018, p. 138–183 (8).

[44] Europa, EU Budget, “How the EU budget is spent”. Online: https://europa.eu/european-union/about-eu/eu-budget/expenditure_en

[45] EUR-LEX, budget, “Total revenue”, 2020. Online : https://eur-lex.europa.eu/budget/www/index-en.htm

[46] Rapport de l’OLAF 2017; Statement of revenue and expenditure of Eurojust for the financial year 2017 – amending budget No 1 (2018/C 279/03); Statement of revenue and expenditure of the European Police Office for the financial year 2017 — amending budget No 1 (2017/C 415/06).

[47] Hartmut Aden, Maria-Luisa Sanchez-Barrueco, Paul Stephenson, European Parliament, Directorate General for Internal Policies, Policy Department D: Budgetary Affairs, The European Public Prosecutor’s Office: Strategies for coping with complexity (IP/D/CONT/IC/2018-113), 15 May 2019, pp. 43-48.

[48] Alison Davies, European Parliament, Briefing : Impact Assessment for a Commission Proposal for a Council Regulation on the Establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (COM (2013) 534 final)., 2013, pp. 1-10.

[49] Samantha Besson, “Sovereignty, International Law and Democracy”, The European Journal of International Law (EJIL), Vol. 22, n°2, 2011, pp. 385-387.

[50] Permanent Court of International Justice, 17 August 1923, SS Wimbledon (France v. Germany), Series A, n°1.

[51] Gaëlle Marti, « Ce que l’Union européenne fait à l’État. Recherches sur l’incidence de l’appartenance à l’Union européenne sur les États-nations », Civitas Europa, vol. 38, no. 1, 2017, pp. 319-322.

[52] Gaëlle Marti, op. cit., pp. 322-326.

[53] Traité sur l’Union européenne, version consolidée de 2016, article 4 § 2.

[54] Gaëlle Marti, op. cit., p. 328.

[55] Gaëlle Marti, op. cit., pp. 329-332.

[56] Amandine Scherrer, Antoine Mégie, et Valsamis Mitsilegas, op. cit.

[57] European Commission, Directorate-General for Communication, “Public opinion in the European Union”, Standard Eurobarometer 86, Autumn 2016, 213 pages.

[58] European Commission, Directorate-General for Communication, “Public opinion in the European Union”, Standard Eurobarometer 86, Autumn 2016, pp. 92-96.

Laisser un commentaire

Fermer le menu